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  1. News! - JustFlight shows off BAe146 Pro custom FMC When X-PlaneReviews did the comprehensive review of JustFlight's exceptional BAe146 Professional, there was one glaring exception... a Universal FMC. Instead we had installed in the aircraft the crappy default X-Plane FMC, which is pretty basic, and useless, to the point it only just does the route for you to follow, and it doesn't look authentic either (not a lot of love there is there). Personally I thought the custom FMC would be months away, but no, as on the JustFlight Facebook page they already give us a glimpse of the coming nirvana. Notes are as follows... "The upcoming v1.2 update will include a variety of fixes and changes, including further improvements to the TMS, but most importantly it introduces a several new navigation options to choose from! In addition to the existing X-Plane 11 FMC, you will now be able to choose from custom UFMC (complete with LNAV/VNAV autopilot integration and performance calculations), the always-popular RealityXP GTN or nothing – for those of you who prefer the classic VOR and NDB navigation for which the 146 was originally designed. The v1.2 update is currently undergoing final testing ahead of its release this month. Here are some pics that show off the work to date." As noted there will be three FMC options, Blank Plates, Universal FMC or the XP Realistic GTN in a custom install... no note is if the current default FMC will also be kept. Note that the blank plate option is very realistic as airlines such as Loganair, AirUK, and Jersey/British European had no FMC systems fitted in the aircraft. The Universal Avionics UNS-1E avionics suite was the installed FMC system in all the BAe146/Avro Series. Currently under final testing and the v1.2 release is coming within this month... says it all, Brilliant! JustFlight's Facebook Page is here: JustFlight-Facebook ________________________________________ News! Update by Stephen Dutton 11th June 2021 Copyright©2021: X-Plane Reviews Disclaimer. All images and text in this review are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions) All Right Reserved
  2. News! - Aircraft Update : JustFlight updates the BAe146 v1.1.1 It is just the teeny-weenyest of updates, just a few... but v1.1.1 shows that JustFlight (Thranda) are still pursuing the smallest of issues and in wanting to get their BAe146 just about perfect. Changelog v1.1.1 - Beacon flashing pattern made more realistic - OAT gauge now always indicated in degrees C - Fixed geometry aft of weather radar - Improved ASI knob usability (supports click-and-hold) - Increased volume of altitude alert callouts - Added aircraft ICAO code - Pop-up window VR compatibility improved - Fixed engine overspeed annunciator light so that it doesn't get stuck after testing A great simulation the British Aerospace 146 is, but it is a demanding simulation that requires a lot of flightdeck work to get the perfect gate or stand to stand experience out there. Still learning and practising, the aircraft is now coming to me, but boy, get it right and the simulation is excellent. This test flight was from EDDL (Düsseldorf) to EKCH (Copenhagen). The aircraft's ICAO code has (finally) been fixed, a small but annoying issue in that elements wouldn't see the the aircraft, like the GHD or Ground Handling Deluxe and animated gates. Both the latest updates have had a lot of attention on altitude and height callouts, so you can now hear them. OAT gauge now indicates in degrees C, and the VR (Virtual Reality) aspect has also had some refinements. All small but significant adjustments. But sadly there is still no sign of the coming custom FMS noted as the Universal Avionics UNS-1E avionics suite... When it comes to hours on an airframe, for me it has been the IXEG Boeing 737 Classic that has provided the most, and the longest test of my learning skills and patience. Fair enough, but the IXEG demands you learn and fly the aircraft with the uttermost skill set, not only at the controls, but also with the systems and complicated avionics. My feel is that this JF BAe146 is next so called deep dive and learn aircraft. It will take time, even years to perfect (like the IXEG) to get the procedures perfectly correct, know every system and to perfect that stand to stand simulation. A notable fix not noted in the changelogs is the internal views in the Replay mode has been fixed!... yeah! Version to v1.1.1 is available through the SkunkCrafts updater which is installed in your X-Plane/Resources/Plugin folder. To update make sure you don't have the BAe146 aircraft selected and select in the Skunkcrafts updater the "JF_BAe_146 selection", then press the "Updater or repair addon" selection. You can of course download the update from the X-Plane.OrgStore or directly from your JustFlight account. The British Aerospace 146 Professional v1.1.1 by JustFlight is also available from the X-Plane.OrgStore, so now get this excellent updated machine, from the main X-Plane store with it's great service and for a LIMITED-TIME SPECIAL OFFER : Get Triple Reward Points when you purchase this Aircraft. 225 Points ___________________ Yes! the British Aerospace 146 Professional by JustFlight is now available from the X-Plane.Org Store here : BAe146 Professional - JustFlight Price is US$74.99 Features Include: Highlights Eight variants of the 146 are included: - 146-100 - 146-200 - 146-300 - 146-200 QC & QT (cargo) - 146-300 QT (cargo) - CC.Mk2 (RAF VIP configuration with countermeasure pods) - C.Mk3 (RAF cargo configuration with countermeasure pods) Accurately modelled using real-world aircraft plans and comprehensive photography of the real aircraft (G-JEAO, ZE701 and ZE708) Numerous animations including: - Trailing edge flap surfaces - Wing-mounted spoilers and tail-mounted airbrake - Ailerons and elevators feature servo tabs, and balanced, free-floating control surfaces which are affected not only by oncoming air, but also by turbulence, side winds, up and down drafts etc. during taxi or low-speed ground operations - All passenger, service and cargo doors use custom animations and featurr extra logic such as the auto-closure of doors above a certain speed - Windscreen wipers with individual left/right animations and independent speed controls - Distinctive retractable tricycle landing gear featuring complex trailing link shock-absorbing mechanism on the main gear - Countermeasure pods, HF aerial and more Cockpit A truly 3D cockpit environment right down to accurately modelled seat belts and screw heads Cockpit textures feature wear and tear based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Captain, Co-pilot and jump-seat positions are modelled with hundreds of functional controls, including over 200 buttons, 100 switches and knobs, with smooth animations, easy-to-use clickspots and precision sounds Fully VR compatible Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'engines running’. These configurations can be customised via the Manifest.json file. Custom throttle lever logic – fuel latch logic which is compatible with hardware (avoiding jitters due to conflicting throttle positions), cutomisable variation in throttle positions for added realism, clickspot for controlling all four levers simultaneously etc. Functional crank handles on knobs such as the altitude select and rudder trim, which allow for more intuitive, realistic and quicker operation Full support for command assignments, hardware and cockpit builders: - All controls can be assigned to commands, with tooltips on every clickspot to indicate which command to use - Parameters such as smoothing animation, number of positions, attached dataref, push-button depth, knob rotation multiplier, frame-skip (for optimisation), default position etc. can all be customised via the Manifest.json file, providing great support for hardware and cockpit builders. - Default commands for landing and taxi lights, windsscreen wipers, panel lights etc. are still respected, despite being implemented with custom functionality Custom features such as ‘hide yokes’ are controllable using default commands (e.g. 'Hide Yoke') as well as via clickspots EFB tablet with door and call-out controls and with AviTab support Sounds Studio quality Lycoming ALF-502 engine sounds, recorded from RAF C.Mk3 ZE708 Over 450 flight deck sound effects recorded from RAF CC.Mk2 ZE701 Detailed audio equipment such as the APU, brake fans, electrical circuits, hydraulic equipment and much more Distinctive flap retraction/extension airflow 'howling' sound More than 520 sounds samples in high definition with accurate 3D placement. Pushing the limits of FMOD 1.08 sound system with more than 150 sound tracks being played at the same time with no virtualisation. Full 7.1 surround sound support via FMOD, with 3D positional sound for VR users Extremely detailed external sound system: - Takes into account distance, speed, altitude, temperature and air pressure, just like in real life - Accurate touchdown sound based on impact speed - Multi-directional sound during fly-by and camera location on external view - Realistic runway roll sounds, complete with periodic bumps that depend on lateral runway position - Realistic wind sound that reacts not only to the speed of the aircraft but also how the wind is interacting with the fuselage (AoA, side slip etc.) - Realistic ambient sounds which replaces the default X-Plane sounds with a high fidelity FMOD sound system recreating the atmospheric effect, such as rain, birds, thunder etc. Interior and cabin sounds: - Passenger sounds, based on aircraft weight, which react according to your flying style. Passenger cabin sound changes as you move around, as if you were inside the real plane. Lighting Full HDR lighting with gimballed lights that can be aimed and dynamically illuminate whichever part of the cockpit is aimed at Independent lighting controls for Captain and First Officer Dimmable integral lighting for each panel, accurately dependent on corresponding electrical bus Dimmable dynamic flood and storm lighting for a highly immersive and customisable night environment (more than 12 individual light sources including entry, lap, sill and flight kit) White and red flashlight for night operations Accurately simulated exterior lighting including dynamic wing, logo and runway exit lights, and taxi/landing and navigation lights with different intensities Strobe lights with customisable strobe flashing pattern All exterior lights, including navigation, strobe, ice, exit, logo, landing, taxi and beacon lights are fully HDR with dynamic spill light, illuminating ground and scenery objects, as well as the aircraft itself. Other Features Comprehensive manual with tutorial, FMC guide, procedures, limitations and handling notes Payload manager for realistic fuel and passenger loads AviTab (third party tablet plugin) compatibleGoodway compatible Multiple interior and exterior viewpoint presets PSD paint kits included (free separate download) so you can create your own paint schemes You can take a look at the full detailed PDF manual here! Requirements X-Plane 11 Windows, Mac or Linux 4 GB VRAM Minimum - 8 GB VRAM Recommended Current Version: 1.1.1 (May 24th 2021) Download Size: 3.6 GB ________________________________________ News! Update by Stephen Dutton 25th May 2021 Copyright©2021: X-Plane Reviews Disclaimer. All images and text in this review are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions) All Right Reserved
  3. News! - Aircraft Updated : BAe 146 Professional updated to v1.1 and now on the X-Plane.OrgStore Poof!... Suddenly there are wheel chocks on my BAe 146 Pro? Where did they come from? Officially the changelog notes a change from the release version v1.0 to v1.1... but in reality there are a load of hidden version changes set out inbetween from the beginning of May. The update changes that have been added in, are v1.0.5 to v1.0.7, so that is three significant sets of new features, changes, bug repairs including the minute v1.1 update that only actually includes the "TMS: Take-off callouts (Power Flex, Power N1, T/O mode)" and the "Additional approach call-out added for glideslope intercept: "Glideslope alive, one dot to go""... cool! Here is the extensive changelog list v1.1 Change log 12, May 2021 -TMS: Take-off callouts (Power Flex, Power N1, T/O mode) v1.0.7 Change log 12, May 2021 -TMS: Limit the TMS actuators to avoid hilariously large values in some cases. -Gracefully handle custom liveries that do not follow the naming conventions. -Adjusted jetway bridge attach points -Hooked up custom callouts for altitude (on approach) -Implemented Auto Warn and Caution cancel logic -Implemented N1 and EGT bug presets when clicking on card. v1.0.6 Change log 6, May 2021 -Tweaked camera cage, so that open doors can be traversed. -Bounding box now adjusts to different fuselage sizes. -Fixed switch sound -Refined gear friction values and chock logic. -Accounted for more brake behaviours (given hydraulic pressure loss, reservoir, etc.) -Made freighter cargo doors require hydraulic pressure -Add freighter door annunciator -Cargo Smoke test added to overhead Test Panel -Improved green hydraulic system pressure gauges -Annunciator logic: Fuel Pump LO PRESS and Engine FUEL LO PRESS lights. -Fixed anti-skid annunciator light. -TMS: Add ability to sync to N1 in SYNC mode. -TMS: Fixed engine synchronization problems. -TMS: Chevron indicator thresholds adjusted. -Improved fuel system, especially for edge cases. -Brakes are now dependent on their selected hydraulic system pressure. -Fixed issue where N1 indicators could snap to 99.9 unexpectedly. -Added VR compatibility for the Checklist and TMS pop-ups. -Fixed pitch setting for copilot's Flight Director. -Added altimeter sync functionality -Pressurization: Fixed CABIN HI ALT annunciator not working when in MAN mode. -Tablet screen: Fuel values can no longer become negative. -Tablet screen: Fixed frozen cargo weight for freighter. v1.0.5 Change log 4, May 2021 -Added chocks, visually and functionally -Added hydraulic system effects to brakes -Improved TMS (Throttle now independent of TMS logic) -Fixed rear seat row in 100 version -TMS no longer on when starting from cold and dark -Created camera collision bounding box for VR (Makes it easier to navigate) -Enabled experimental flight model (No longer necessary to enable it in-sim) -Added VR click spots to some tablet interaction zones -Fixed annunciator test button flicker when cold and dark All versions to v1.0.6 or now v1.1 are only available through the SkunkCrafts updater which is installed in your X-Plane/Resources/Plugin folder. To update make sure you don't have the BAe146 aircraft selected and select in the Skunkcrafts updater the "JF_BAe_146 selection", then press the "Updater or repair addon" selection. Noticeable (besides the new chocks) are the changes on the renamed Menu/Doors and Reflections pop-up panel... Now the chocks selection is available far top left, the quality of the chocks are excellent, and to be able to select them when YOU want to is a huge bonus. More additions now also include choices to have both window or instrumentation reflections or not... nice. The Airbridge attach points have also been adjusted (not really a big deal on this mostly walkon/walkoff aircraft). A lot of adjustments have been added to the Cargo aspects of the aircraft... these include; freighter cargo doors now require hydraulic pressure, added freighter door annunciator, Cargo Smoke test added to overhead panel and fixed the frozen cargo weight. System adjustments include; hydraulic system effects for brakes, brakes are now also dependent on their selected hydraulic system pressure and brake behaviours (given hydraulic pressure loss, reservoir, etc.) are better, Improved fuel system. And there has also been added altimeter sync functionality. X-PlaneReviews full comprehensive review of the JustFlight BAe 146 is here; Aircraft Review : British Aerospace 146 Professional by JustFlight Now! - the British Aerospace 146 Professional v1.1 by JustFlight is available from the X-Plane.OrgStore, so now get this excellent updated machine, from the main X-Plane store with it's great service and for a LIMITED-TIME SPECIAL OFFER : Get Triple Reward Points when you purchase this Aircraft. 225 Points ___________________ Yes! the British Aerospace 146 Professional by JustFlight is now available from the X-Plane.Org Store here : BAe146 Professional - JustFlight Price is US$74.99 Features Include: Highlights Eight variants of the 146 are included: - 146-100 - 146-200 - 146-300 - 146-200 QC & QT (cargo) - 146-300 QT (cargo) - CC.Mk2 (RAF VIP configuration with countermeasure pods) - C.Mk3 (RAF cargo configuration with countermeasure pods) Accurately modelled using real-world aircraft plans and comprehensive photography of the real aircraft (G-JEAO, ZE701 and ZE708) Numerous animations including: - Trailing edge flap surfaces - Wing-mounted spoilers and tail-mounted airbrake - Ailerons and elevators feature servo tabs, and balanced, free-floating control surfaces which are affected not only by oncoming air, but also by turbulence, side winds, up and down drafts etc. during taxi or low-speed ground operations - All passenger, service and cargo doors use custom animations and featurr extra logic such as the auto-closure of doors above a certain speed - Windscreen wipers with individual left/right animations and independent speed controls - Distinctive retractable tricycle landing gear featuring complex trailing link shock-absorbing mechanism on the main gear - Countermeasure pods, HF aerial and more Cockpit A truly 3D cockpit environment right down to accurately modelled seat belts and screw heads Cockpit textures feature wear and tear based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Captain, Co-pilot and jump-seat positions are modelled with hundreds of functional controls, including over 200 buttons, 100 switches and knobs, with smooth animations, easy-to-use clickspots and precision sounds Fully VR compatible Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'engines running’. These configurations can be customised via the Manifest.json file. Custom throttle lever logic – fuel latch logic which is compatible with hardware (avoiding jitters due to conflicting throttle positions), cutomisable variation in throttle positions for added realism, clickspot for controlling all four levers simultaneously etc. Functional crank handles on knobs such as the altitude select and rudder trim, which allow for more intuitive, realistic and quicker operation Full support for command assignments, hardware and cockpit builders: - All controls can be assigned to commands, with tooltips on every clickspot to indicate which command to use - Parameters such as smoothing animation, number of positions, attached dataref, push-button depth, knob rotation multiplier, frame-skip (for optimisation), default position etc. can all be customised via the Manifest.json file, providing great support for hardware and cockpit builders. - Default commands for landing and taxi lights, windsscreen wipers, panel lights etc. are still respected, despite being implemented with custom functionality Custom features such as ‘hide yokes’ are controllable using default commands (e.g. 'Hide Yoke') as well as via clickspots EFB tablet with door and call-out controls and with AviTab support Sounds Studio quality Lycoming ALF-502 engine sounds, recorded from RAF C.Mk3 ZE708 Over 450 flight deck sound effects recorded from RAF CC.Mk2 ZE701 Detailed audio equipment such as the APU, brake fans, electrical circuits, hydraulic equipment and much more Distinctive flap retraction/extension airflow 'howling' sound More than 520 sounds samples in high definition with accurate 3D placement. Pushing the limits of FMOD 1.08 sound system with more than 150 sound tracks being played at the same time with no virtualisation. Full 7.1 surround sound support via FMOD, with 3D positional sound for VR users Extremely detailed external sound system: - Takes into account distance, speed, altitude, temperature and air pressure, just like in real life - Accurate touchdown sound based on impact speed - Multi-directional sound during fly-by and camera location on external view - Realistic runway roll sounds, complete with periodic bumps that depend on lateral runway position - Realistic wind sound that reacts not only to the speed of the aircraft but also how the wind is interacting with the fuselage (AoA, side slip etc.) - Realistic ambient sounds which replaces the default X-Plane sounds with a high fidelity FMOD sound system recreating the atmospheric effect, such as rain, birds, thunder etc. Interior and cabin sounds: - Passenger sounds, based on aircraft weight, which react according to your flying style. Passenger cabin sound changes as you move around, as if you were inside the real plane. Lighting Full HDR lighting with gimballed lights that can be aimed and dynamically illuminate whichever part of the cockpit is aimed at Independent lighting controls for Captain and First Officer Dimmable integral lighting for each panel, accurately dependent on corresponding electrical bus Dimmable dynamic flood and storm lighting for a highly immersive and customisable night environment (more than 12 individual light sources including entry, lap, sill and flight kit) White and red flashlight for night operations Accurately simulated exterior lighting including dynamic wing, logo and runway exit lights, and taxi/landing and navigation lights with different intensities Strobe lights with customisable strobe flashing pattern All exterior lights, including navigation, strobe, ice, exit, logo, landing, taxi and beacon lights are fully HDR with dynamic spill light, illuminating ground and scenery objects, as well as the aircraft itself. Other Features Comprehensive manual with tutorial, FMC guide, procedures, limitations and handling notes Payload manager for realistic fuel and passenger loads AviTab (third party tablet plugin) compatibleGoodway compatible Multiple interior and exterior viewpoint presets PSD paint kits included (free separate download) so you can create your own paint schemes You can take a look at the full detailed PDF manual here! Requirements X-Plane 11 Windows, Mac or Linux 4 GB VRAM Minimum - 8 GB VRAM Recommended Current Version: 1.1 (May 12th 2021) Download Size: 3.6 GB ________________________________________ News! Update by Stephen Dutton 13th May 2021 Copyright©2021: X-Plane Reviews Disclaimer. All images and text in this review are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions) All Right Reserved
  4. Aircraft Review : British Aerospace 146 Professional by JustFlight Was it the accidental success story that even the aircraft manufacturers of British Aerospace were surprised by? It certainly was not expected to be a big seller, but it was, if just under 400 airframes produced was a major success story. But a great aircraft it is. The British Aerospace (BAe) 146 was created to fill in a marketing gap. Faster and bigger than a regional turboprop, but smaller than a standard airliner like the 100 seater segment Fokker 100 and even the smallest of the Boeing 737 family. Designed for the regional and short-haul markets, the 146 was manufactured from 1983 until 2002. The aircraft was offered in three variants, the 146-100, 146-200 and 146-300. The equivalent Avro variants were RJ70, RJ85 and RJ100, plus the QT "Quiet Trader" and QC "Quick Change" variant. The BAe 146 was marketed heavily as a low maintenance, low operating cost, feeder airliner. Design simplicity was the priority. Many components used were off the shelf products that could be easily sourced with a minimum of specialised tooling required. This went a long way to keeping the maintenance cost of the airliner down. Using the knowledge gained in the production of the Trident and Airbus A300, the wing was made also of as few components as possible. There are no leading edge slats and the top panel of the main wing is a single piece. The wide passenger cabin of the aircraft had a standard configuration of 5 abreast seating, although a high density 6 abreast configuration was also available... but the most significant aspect of the BAe 146 was it's 4 engine configuration. The four engine layout is unusual for an airframe of this size. Four engines create complexity, but also reliability, The Avco Lycoming ALF 502 H engines produced 6,500lbf of thrust each, and were chosen for several reasons. First the BAe 146 was designed from the start to be high cantilever wing, T-tail airliner with huge STOL (Short Takeoff and Landing) capablities, and the high set engines were set in the best positioned not to ingest dirt and matter in to the engines. Another notion was that at the time there was not a better or more powerful two or twin engine option available. ALF 502 engine was based on the Lycoming T55 turboshaft which was the power behind Chinook heavy-lift helicopters. It was a very quiet engine due to a geared front fan which meant it didn’t have to spin as fast keeping the blade tip speed below the sound barrier. Other quietness factors were the high by-pass ratio as well as sound-dampening layers and the BAe 146 was marketed as the "WhisperJet". Electric power was produced by generators on the two outboard engines which gave easier access for maintenance. Keeping down running and maintenance costs, the engines were modular in construction so that parts could more quickly and easily be replaced. The aircraft configuration was also designed to enable high performance on short runways with a superior climb out rate, perfect for clearing nearby obstacles. This also enabled it to perform well at hot and high airfields where lift conditions are poor. When flight testing began, it was found that the aircraft had better takeoff and climb performance than expected, this is certainly enforced by the spectacular BAe's 146 performance in and out of London's City (LCY) airport with it's physical dimensions of the 1,508 m (4,948 ft) long runway and the steep 7.5° glideslope which is double of most 3º approaches. This highly anticipated JustFlight version of the BAe 146 is not the first one released for the X-Plane Simulator as that notion easily goes to the "Avroliner Project". I have been a huge supporter over the years of the AvroLiner Project by Andreas Much... The "Avroliner Project" was one of those projects that you signed up for, with consistent updates coming along mostly twice a year, but with smaller "Overnight" updates in-between. I loved the aircraft immensely and it was very good for it's time, but the project, sort went a bit sparse with more attention given over later to the actual website than the aircraft, but it is not to forget how much a leader the aircraft was for X-Plane in it's heyday development. A note that the difference between the 146 and the RJ versions is that the earlier 146 has a clockwork dial cockpit, were as the RJ series has a semi-glass cockpit. Currently there are still 94 aircraft in active service in the world, that being 30 BAe 146s and 64 Avro RJs, with most a conversion cargo aircraft. That sort of sets up the high expectations for this new BAe 146 release from JustFlight with their version of this classic regional airliner, the 146 has already had a release but in the P3D platform format. JustFlight's earlier detail and quality of their aircraft proceeds them, and then add in the advantage of Thranda Design doing all the X-Plane systems and performance, as it puts this release then into the stratosphere of expectation, so can it or even possibly live up to all that high regards? British Aerospace (BAe) 146 by JustFlight A first impression and the JustFlight version of the 146-300, certainly does not disappoint on the modeling or the quality... it is certainly on par with the highly regarded Rotate McDonnell Douglas MD-80. Variants included in the JustFlight BAe 146 Package You get A LOT of different variants and aircraft configurations with this BAe 146 package, so let us go through each variant first. BAe 146 Series 100 Length 28.19 m (85’ 11”) - Wingspan 26.34 m (86’ 5”) - Height 8.61 m (28’ 3”) BAe 146 Series 200 Length 28.6 m (93’ 10”) - Wingspan 26.34 m (86’ 5”) - Height 8.61 m (28’ 3”) BAe 146 Series 300 Length 30.99 m (101’ 8”) - Wingspan 26.34 m (86’ 5”) - Height 8.61 m (28’ 3”) BAe 146 Series 200QT "Quiet Trader" Quiet Traders come with a large side cargo door and internal freight, there is no -100 series QT variant BAe 146 Series 300QT "Quiet Trader" BAe 146 Series 200QC "Quick Change" The Quick Change variants come with a large side cargo door and internal freight, but also a cabin forward. There are no -100 or -300 QC Variants only a -200QC. There is however one other QC Livery for the -200 in a RAF Military quise and military elements. CC.Mk2 - RAF Statesman (ZE701) – Queen’s Flight CC.Mk2 - RAF Statesman (ZE701-Modern Livery) – Queen’s Flight Both Queens Flight aircraft are -100 Series aircraft, and note the infrared countermeasures on the side and rear of the Queens Flight Aircraft Modeling and design The problem for JustFlight is that they set their standards very high with the detail and quality of say their BAe Hawk T1/A Trainer. The Bae 146 is of course very, very good in context, again the Rotate MD80 is a good bench mark. One thing to note first off is that BAe 146 is heavy in detail, so it feels heavish on your computer, it sorts of catches up with you (revealing the base modeling in the process) when changing from the internal to external view points, it does not do anything wrong, but you feel the computer has a lot to process or get through to get the changes done... so if you have a light or low powered computer, then you will slightly struggle. Framerate was actually quite good, and in the normal numbers for me between 30fr-36fr with all the bells and whistles running on the ground with the Aerosoft's Zurich scenery installed. But if you struggle now then this airframe won't help you out. The Texture Quality images here are not shown in the "Maximum" setting, but in "High", but the differences between the two settings is minuscule, and that setting (unless you have a power house computer) is the best compromise between quality and efficiency. Glass is of course excellent, nicely shaped with great depth, tint and reflection... and delivers in realism. Notable are the aerodynamic strakes on the nose/fuselage (and wings as we will see) that add in authenticity to the aircraft... The 146's wing is interesting. As noted it is high cantilever one piece wing with no leading edge spoilers, but highly efficient. And I love the construction detail that JustFlight have done here as you can easily see the different assembly (Ailerons, flaps, spoilers) sections of the wing frame that are neatly designed and visible. Under wing detail shows all the wing access panels The leading edge is excellent with that noted aerodynamic splitter above the inner engines. Wing lighting looks authentic as well, but the wingtip inner Nav lights are a bit clumsy, all static dischargers are excellent. There flap guidance tracks on the side of the upper fuselage are really well done and when extended to full flap, extends out to the full complexity of the 146 flap system... .... I know how hard these complex flap systems are to animate, and JustFlight have done a stirling job here. The lift spoilers here are open, and note the small inner wing aileron that is really well done... as noted the detail here is simply first rate. The Avco Lycoming ALF 502 H engines are beautifully modeled and perfectly shaped. Inlet and exhaust areas are perfect and nicely cast with a realistic metal cowling on the inlet and lovely shaped engine mounts. The internal fans are highly realistic, but there are no thrust-reverser systems on the BAe 146. APU (Auxiliary Power Unit) inlet and outlet is nicely done, as is the high T-Tail detail... The famous split-airbrake tail assembly is excellent, with the internal rear lighting frame expertly done, as is the bulkhead, airbrake door detail is also very, very good with internal ribbing for strength, and with cutouts for weight savings. Note the wing speedbrake extentions when tail airbrake is activated. The undercarriage on the T1/A Hawk was exceptional with every joint, component, hydraulic line, hydraulic piston, nut and bolt is all the same and applied here, even the strut labels and markings are also correctly applied. The same can also be said of the BAe 146... in exceptional in the gear detail and realism... The nose gear is stubby... ... but the Eagle Claw trailing link main gear is exceptional in detailing. The work here is based on G-JEAO - Serial No. 1010 LN:10, which was retired from service with British European Airways in 2000 and is now preserved at the de Havilland Aircraft Museum. And the detail reproduced here is from that aircraft in all it's glory. Tyres are again like on the Hawk are excellent as are the cast rims, and bolt detail. Menu/Features The menu is surprisingly quite small with only eight selections (The Hawk had 21) to choose from and positioned via the usual JustFlight left screen side arrow, scrolling on the arrow will make it transparent. There is another menu built into the pop-up AviTab tablet. The side menu eight selections cover; ‘Toggle power’ icon (the lightning bolt) will toggle between ‘Cold & Dark’ and ‘Ready for Take-off’ states, Checklist panel, Flight computer, Animation panel (Doors and Ladder), Autopilot (Panels), Toggle the VSI between analogue and digital TCAS, Thrust Management System and the Weather radar... and on the bottom of the tab are the arrows to change the livery. The Animation panel allows you to open all four main fuselage doors, with extendable stairs on the left front main entry door... ... two lower Cargo Doors and if you are using the Cargo variant then the menu changes to access the one large left rear cargo door. There is an GPU (Ground Power Unit) toggle, but in power supply only and no physical GPU unit? Also noted by their absence, there are no Static Elements? AviTab Menu Note the AviTab plugin is required to use this feature. There is another built in menu built into the AviTab, and this is a very good if basic Weights and Balance menu... the pop-up tablet is accessed by pressing the dark patches on both front side panels. The AviTab has all the usual AviTab features including Navigraph intergration if you have a subscription. On the head of the tablet is the speed, altitude, AGL Altitude and heading (Lat-Lon). Press the top left screen change icon and it changes to another aircraft layout menu for again opening the doors, stairs and GPU... But also here you also have a weights and balance setting page to adjust passenger, cargo and the aircraft's fuel weights (arrowed)... all changes are recorded in Empty, Zero Fuel, Total Fuel and Gross weight boxes, that can be switched from Kg to Lb units. Overload the weight (very easy to do on the -100/-200 variants) and it shows up into the red. Top right on the menu are five voice announcements, that can be reset. Cabin A look up and the BAe 146 Cabin awaits... ... all four access doors are highly detailed (as are the extended stairs), but on board there is a little bit of 3d modeling in the crew seating, but most of the forward galley is simply Lo-Res textures (images)... It is not bad, but to be honest I expected more 3d detail in the galley areas. Cabin is the same... very nice but not overwhelming. But we are actually lucky in X-Plane as the JustFlight P3D version does not have any cabin layout at all? This JustFlight Version uses the six across seater layout and not the more spacious five across seating layout. Seats are again good, rather than excellent, with again the use of images to do the 3d modeling work. Ditto the overhead panels with just flat images to represent the lighting and switch panels and the air-con vents, they are a bit low-res as well. Rear galley is the same layout with lo-rate images, nice and a lot of image detail, but again not overwhelming. The Cargo variant has a sealed off front galley area and a cargo hold rear. It is all nicely detailed, but not an uber cargo interior detailed like excellent SSG B748... Cargo container is very nice, but only the one... stingy. The QC Quick Change variant does not have the combo seating and cargo interior, but it is just the same Cargo layout as the QT Quiet Trader variant... disappointing, but there you go? Cargo door detail however is excellent, note the highly detailed door conversion frame set into the fuselage. Cockpit Overview You can close or open the connection door between the cabin and the cockpit, by selecting the door... note the folded stairs to the left. Even for an airliner cockpit, it is tight in here, there is barely enough room to sit behind the controls... If JustFlight skimped in the rear, then the cockpit in detail is totally in the other overwhelming direction... it is a brilliantly detailed cockpit. Both the Captain's and First Officer's chairs are superb, great seat molding and shape with a highly detailed frame lower, and covered by a lovely full blue/cream dot material. Armrests are also all fully animated, and fold up neatly to the side of the chairs. Note the third folded seat behind the First Officer's station, better still you can move both the Captain's and First Officers chairs forward via a slider, then slide out the jump seat via it's own slider (all arrowed) and lower the seat cushion... now that is a great feature. Centre pedestal is highly detailed and the overhead panel is simply huge and also full of detail. This is a complicated layout. That is an interesting point to make. Most pilots new to this flight deck would simply want to jump in and fly the BAe 146... but that would be simply deadly. These 146s have a very unusual switchgear layout, plus the systems created here are very deep... this JustFlight BAe 146 is noted as "Professional" in that it is a "Study Grade" simulation and the extensive and deeply detailed manual bears that aspect out, the manual alone is 247 pages in size and a study of the systems and layouts are essential to getting the very best out of this aircraft. Even I had to stop, do the manual in a professional way and then go back to setting up the aircraft before doing any other aspect of understanding this complex simulation. Instrument Panel I love the layout of this instrument panel, complex, clockwork and very well done for an aircraft of this era. Yokes are lovely, and fully active with A/P Disconnect, Electric Trim and a large button right yoke is the "Sync" selection. You can hide both Yokes or each one individually by clicking on the Yoke base, which is a nice option. Close up panel detail is simply first rate and very authentic, with nice highly realistic instrument reflections. Power on (via the GPU)... The electrical power system on the BAe 146 has both AC and DC power services. AC power is supplied by two (outer) engine-driven generators, an APU-driven generator, a ground source and a hydraulically driven standby generator. The standby generator also supplies DC power. DC power is normally provided by transformer rectifiers (TRs) which convert the AC (provided by the engine and APU generators or the external source) to DC. The aircraft battery provides an emergency DC supply and also, via a standby static inverter, an emergency AC supply. The AC and DC supplies are distributed by a network of busbars classified as normal, essential and emergency. The normal busbars are duplicated to form the basis of a two-channel system: channels 1 and 2, both having AC and DC busbars. Even when I selected GPU and all the correct bus channels the, aircraft didn't receive any power? It was the EXT AC supply that I had missed (arrowed), and here are the points to make... as a lot of the switchgear in here is a three-way switch system, and finding the correct switch and the right switch position can need a little study. Again to understand anything complex, then break it down into sections and study, and that is certainly the case here with the 146's Instruments. The central Artificial Horizon is very authentic in detail... known here as the Attitude Director Indicator (ADI), it provides a visual presentation of the pitch and roll attitude of the aircraft on a spherical display. The side scale shows glideslope, and localiser deviation is presented on the lower horizontal scale, and an inclinometer is mounted on the lower front face of the instrument. F-Fast and S-Slow indications, plus the ILS indicator... There is a secondary backup ADI right. A cross-pointer flight director bar system centre displays the AFGS-computed commands, and is switched on via switch upper right, (upper left on the right hand side), and the Flight Director bars will be disabled if using the Autopilot (AP). Left of the ADI is the Airspeed Indicator with built in Mach markings, Right is the Altitude Indicator. Above is a very good and highly detailed Annunciator warning panel which you can test and adjust the brightness and follows the white, green, blue, amber or red legends warning system. There is a Instrument Comparator Monitor (ICM), compares the Captain’s and First Officer’s primary attitude and heading displays and if a difference shows warnings (ICM panel is upper left of the ADI) Lower centre Instrument panel is the Horizontal situation indicator (HSI), with built in Vertical Speed Indicator, with Heading indicator, MILES (to go) and GND Speed displays. The 146 has an identical twin gyro-magnetically stabilised compass systems installed. A flux valve is situated in each wing. With selections 1/2 that allows transfers to the other heading display Two instruments left of the HSI is a Stopwatch/Clock and a Distance Bearing Indicator (DBI) for VOR1 (DME 1) and VOR2 (DME 2). Note the Radio altimeter above the Vertical Speed Indicator. As noted in the Menu, the standard Vertical Speed Indicator (VSI) can be switched to a combined VSI and TCAS display. In addition to indicating the vertical speed, it also displays any potential TCAS conflicts. Right of the VSI is a backup Altitude Indicator... ... lower are the brake pressure dials. Note the Radio altimeter above the VSI. On the First Officer's right side pane the layout is a little simpler, but has mostly the same Standard Six instrument layout... Centre are the same nice Attitude Director Indicator (ADI), Horizontal situation indicator (HSI), with left the Airspeed Indicator, Distance Bearing Indicator (DBI) and to the right the Altitude Indicator and Stopwatch/Clock, with the Vertical Speed Indicator (VSI) set below. To the left centre of the First Officer's main instruments is the Thrust Modulation System (TMS) panel. The TMS system operates in a variety of modes and consists of a control display unit (CDU), through which the pilot can select a required mode of operation, which is interfaced with a microprocessor-based computer (TMC) driving an actuator on each engine fuel control unit to provide limited trim authority about thrust lever settings. System disconnect push-buttons are located on No.1 and 4 engine thrust levers. There are four modes the TMS system covers; Take-off (TO), TMS disconnect (GA), Maximum continuous thrust (MCT), Turbine gas temperature (TGT) and Flight descent (DESC). Set below the TMS is the Cabin Pressure gauge and OAT (Outside Air Pressure) Gauge. Centre Instument panel is dominated by the four engine sets of readout dials... ... per engine row they cover with the top five dials; Oil Quanity, Oil Temp and Oil Pressure. N1 output, TGT (Turbine Gas Temperature) and N2 ouput. Fuel Flow (FF) with Fuel Used indicators... bottom row are the three Fuel Gauges. There are three main fuel tank compartments; The Main wing compartment, Feed(er) tanks and a Surge tank... Fuel consumption is per variant; 146-100 : 425 kn: 2,468 kg (5,441 lb)/h, 146-200 : 423 kn: 2,483 kg (5,474 lb)/h, 146-300 : 429 kn: 2,517 kg (5,549 lb)/h... with ranges of; 146-100 : 82 pax: 3,870 km (2,090 nmi), 146-200 : 100 pax: 3,650 km (1,970 nmi) and 146-300 : 100 pax: 3,340 km (1,800 nmi). The fuel system is complex, but well explained by JustFlight, and transfer of fuel is possible. Very top right of the center panel is a Engine Vibration Indicator Monitor (EVIM) comprising of four separate meter mechanisms presenting vertical indication displays for engines 1, 2, 3 and 4 from the left which can be tested (arrowed lower, lower left). Below the EVIM is the flap position indicator 0º-18º-24º-30º and 33º degrees, Spolier Indicator and Landing Gear Handle/Indicator. The Master Warning System (MWS) provides the flight crew with indication of aircraft systems malfunction, status and the system is displayed on a very large warnings panel centre left and can be tested via button on the MWS Panel upper right (arrowed) and again follows the white, green, blue, amber or red legends warning system. OverHead Panel There is a lot of switchgear and detail on the OverHead Panel (OHP). All the aircraft's various systems are grouped together in panels, that can be split into upper or lower Overhead Panel(s). Upper OHP. There is a lot on these upper sections and selections of the panel, that are usually sited in the lower sections. Top of the left are Yaw Dampers, and the "Main" switches for Autopilot and Avionics power. Anti-Skid and Lift and an Hydraulic panel fills out the left. The Hydraulic power is provided by two independent systems, Yellow and Green, each having an engine-driven pump (EDP) as its main source of power as well as a standby power facility and the switch arrangement means you can control both Yellow and Green channels. The Fire Protection system on the Just Flight 146 is quite comprehensive. Each engine is equipped with a fire detection system which consists of four detector loops in two parallel pairs. When the loops are subjected to heat, a signal is transmitted to a warning system as soon as a preset temperature is reached. The warning system comprises of red and amber flight deck presentations with associated audio warnings. Each engine is also equipped with a fire extinguishing system consisting of two extinguisher bottles for each engine. The bottles are in the nose cowling of each engine. The APU, Wings, pylons, fuselage spine, electrical equipment bay and the air-conditioning equipment bay are all active in warning systems. Right Panel top is the External and Notice lighting panel, with the Air-Conditioning Panel set below. Lower OHP. The full left side of the lower OHP covers the Fuel Panel, then the Electric Panel. Top centre of the lower OHP is the APU (Auxiliary Power Unit) panel, then below the Engine Power and Start panel. Set below is the Ice-Protection warnings and switches. Right top lower OHP, is a large Pressurization Panel that covers with the Air Supply Panel, more Ice-Protection warnings and switches bottom centre and lower bottom right is an annunciator lighting and OHP lighting adjustment panel. Very bottom centre is the lighting switchgear for FlightDeck Emergency, RWY Exit Lights, Landing Lights and the left and right windscreen wipers (Three-Way) and finally the Seat Beat light switch. As this JustFlight BAe 146 is a "Study" grade aircraft, then the systems and their operations are quite comprehensive. The manual does thankfully detail everything here, but the depth of the system knowledge required here is quite high. So "Study" means just that in going deep into these systems and understanding them to get the best out of the simulation. Autopilot The Smiths SEP 10 BAe 146 automatic flight guidance system has an integrated autopilot and flight director system which provides a three- axis stabilisation and two-axis manoeuvre computation in pitch and roll, in addition to flight director computation. Study is again required here as the layout of this AP panel is quite different, the ALT (Altitude) ARM is hard to see, but I love the winding ALT SEL knob (you will find that mouse wheel settings are more accurate), and the HDG (Heading) knob is centre lower panel (took me ages to find that?) Also centre are the Course selection knobs (both NAV1 or NAV2). VHF navigation has a panel to itself on the left, you will need to turn it on via the switch, and then press the centre knob to activate (there is a Automatic Direction Finder (ADF) panel lower pedestal). VHF NAV right is VOR 2 (NAV2) radio and besides there is a brilliant "ILS TEST" system for the instruments. Engagement of the autopilot is indicated by a green triangles on the AP button at the top of the panel. The bottom row selects lateral modes and the middle row selects vertical modes. There is a Turbulence mode (TURB) mode... This mode is one of a PITCH and ROLL attitude hold, with the initial datums being those at the time of engagement. On selecting TURB, any other pitch or roll mode (or armed state) will disengage. Centre Pedestal The pedestal is very nice and boxy, but extremely well done. FMS (Flight Management System) is currently provided by the default X-Plane FMS system... so it is basic. There is a custom built FMS system coming for this aircraft in the future, and it will be a free upgrade. The late FMC is also the reason the aircraft is a little late in it's release (as well as the Covid 19 disruptions). JustFlight in rather than waiting for even more time, is releasing the aircraft and not waiting any longer on the ongoing FMC development, no timescale on the release of the better custom FMS has currently been announced other than "Soon". Centre of the top of the pedestal is a (again X-Plane default) weather radar, with VHF COMMs set below (you have to turn them on). Airbrake (Speedbrake) and Flap lever strides the stubby four impressive throttles, they have a fuel safety switch on each lever, to disengage, but as noted there is no reverse thrust levers (you have to move the Airbrakes manually as well)... Elevator Trim wheels are each side of the pedestal, and the Rudder Trim knob is on the top, and the trim positions are noted on the same panel. The Aileron Trim Knob, Parking Brake and ELEV/AIL are all on the slope panel. There is a secondary AP Panel (also on the menu pop-out), that activates and adjusts the PITCH and ROLL selections. There is a transponder that allows an ATC code and flight identification code to be entered, with XPNDR/TA and TA/RA selections. Bottom pedestal is an active BRAKE TEMPºC panel, ADF1 & ADF2 Radio and console lighting knobs (three). Side panels There are set each side a Radio and Panel Lighting panel... note the tiller wheel on both sides. Note the cup-holder that slides outwards. Lower is an Oxygen Panel, and Air Vents that can be adjusted. Window detail and opening assembly is excellent (but solid). First Officer's side has the same tiller, Cup holder (also animated), Radio and Panel Lighting knobs. There is a Flight Recorder date setting panel (that works!) and also a working Oxygen Control panel upper right. Lighting The BAe 146 lighting is extremely impressive, but also extremely complicated to use. There are four lighting panels to adjust, one each pilot side, OHP and rear console and the odd lighting knob set around the OHP. Most overhead (Storm, both side panels) and main panel lighting lights activate fluorescent tubes and filaments, which are really well done under the glareshield. Left side Instruments and Centre dials are adjusted via the left lighting panel and the right side instruments are lit via the right hand panel, Glareshield lighting is via knob lower left OHP. The best lighting feature is the centre adjustment knob on the lighting panel and two buttons for "SILL" and "LAP"... press SILL and you have a magnificent adjustable flexible stalks with a light on them... they can be positioned anywhere for the illumination of the instrument panel or side panels. There are also two "LAP" lights that are also adjustable for local illumination for reading purposes, or again to light the panel. Under LIGHTS & NOTICES panel there are also two rear ENTRY lights. OHP is simply gorgeous in lighting detail, both all the switchgear and the dial lighting can be adjusted separately. There are knee high side lights on each side of the cockpit, and again adjustable... which is a very nice touch in detail. Three knobs rear adjust the console front and rear sections, and an overhead illumination. In reality there are so many combinations you can find to get that perfect lighting scenario, for on the ground, in the air working or for minimum approach instrument lighting... it is all quite perfect. Other lighting includes EMERG CALL, CABIN CALL and GRND CALL and a reset button annotated PUSH CNCL CALL, but they don't work? Cabin, vestibule, toilet and galley lighting is provided by fluorescent tubes, with additional filament lighting in the front vestibule when ground power is connected. Illuminating signs indicate ‘fasten seatbelts’, ‘no smoking’ and ‘toilet engaged’, with a ‘return to seat’ sign in each toilet, as well as EXIT and galley lighting... of all I found only the EXIT and Galley lighting worked, but the cabin lights worked well in the daytime... but there is no cabin lighting at night. External Lighting As with the cockpit, the external lighting is extremely good as well.... Navigation lights are three-way selectable; Off-Lo and Hi. Nice tail lighting, ENTRY lighting switch can be mistaken for external use, but it is as noted for overhead cockpit use. Wing root shoulders has two sets of lights for the excellent runway turnoff lighting, and for wing (ice) lighting which is also excellent... both taxi and landing lighting is in the wing leading edge. ____________________ Flying the BAe 146 There are as noted a lot of depth in the systems in this JustFlight 146. So the awareness of all the systems and their layout positions is essential before tackling any flight. The built-in (Menu) Checklists are also invaluable to getting everything ready for flight, again I stress, that this 146 is not a hop in and fly aircraft, there is simply too much going on to do that quick fly aspect. Starting up the APU, is quite easy... then switch on the aircraft batteries and provide power to the busses. When you switch, either power, air-conditioning, hydraulics in that every action has an effect and all seen in the gauges... the depth of the systems here are really phenomenal... ... particle effects are really good as well... this the APU, but the engine thrust effects are very good as well. I am loaded just under the Gross Weight Limit 42178kg, with 106 Pass (-300), servicing the ZUR (Zurich) to BRS (Bristol) Route of 601 nm, which is about normal for the BAe 146. The full range in this configuration is 1,800 nmi. I am not going to cover the default FMS System here in this review... as almost everyone is very familiar with the system, and overall it is very basic, we will cover the FMS in detail when the custom version is released. Although the aircraft IS complex, the engine start is quite easy. Make sure all the fuel pumps are on, set the APU Air on (Bleed)... Shutting any doors or hatches and pulling in the stairs give off great action sounds, open the cockpit door and passengers are a noisy talkative group, so you close the cockpit door again for a bit of flightdeck quiet. I switched all the throttle fuel locks off before starting the engines, it is easier than fiddling around with them later... ... select the engine you want to start, but always first an outer engine for a generator power supply, via the main switch... Start Power on, CONT IGN (Ignition) on (There is a separate in Flight Start option if required), and hit the START switch... The Avco Lycoming ALF 502 H engines will then spool up very, very quickly to the 20% n2 starting point, were at this point you up the throttle from the detent to the idle position to start the fuel flow, the engine then completes the start procedure to settle around the 52% n2 running in idle. If you want the full whine and intricate startup sounds then you will be disappointed here, because there is isn't any, well a little, but these tiny Avro engines are super quiet, even when all four are running it is hard to hear anything from the cockpit, except for a nice humm... the 146 isn't called the "Whisper Jet" for nothing. Final checks of the GRND (Ground) test panel... the test of the Stall Warning will jump you out of your seat, but all the different sounds are very authentic, and a double check of the MWS Panel is also a good thing to do... .... last thing to do before pulling away is to set the Thrust Modulation System (TMS) for takeoff and sync all the engine thrusts together to the current airfield temperature, it takes time to set it's self up, but again very authentic and well worth learning to use correctly. After spending an eternity on the ground, it will good to just fly the 146. Unless you have one of those Thrustmaster TCA Quadrants with the four lever option, then you will have to do what I did, lock the four throttles together as one, not ideal, but no option. Flaps are set at 18º for takeoff, but this 146 is a STOL aircraft so a higher flap selection will give you more lift on a shorter runway... On Joysticks/Throttles, JustFlight recommend to set the "TakeOff-GoAround" selection on your Joystick/Throttle to activate the TO-GO system if required. There are significant differences between the different three variants, even by load capacity and weight as well, so this -300 at a gross full weight feels very heavy, even ponderous in the taxi, I don't mind as I love heavy aircraft to fly for the feel, but you have to be aware of the wide band of feel of flying the 146 in size and weight. In the taxi it is nice to tool around the taxiways, but as noted you need a little thrust to move the set weight. Two notes... you can physically move the tiller to steer the aircraft as well as using the standard (joystick) yaw which is a brilliant option, it was usually one or the other. Another point is to check the "Config" button, which is similar to the Airbus "Config" test. It tells you if the aircraft is fully set up for takeoff, if not the red "Config" alert will show in the MWS... aircraft ‘doors not closed’ warning system is also part of the config system, but I missed a setup as we shall see. I have a departure from Rwy28 at ZRH, but at 8202 ft, it is the very shortest at Zurich... .... throttles up and I am away... very slowly, and the speed builds slowly with the weight as well, soon I am seeing the wrong end of the runway 28, but just nudging the 150 knt takeoff speed, a slight pull of the yoke to the rear, and thankfully the 146 bites the air. But I do now have that "Config" alert now screaming in my face... I missed something, which shows there is a lot of detail to cover to get this 146 ready for flight. I have "Positive climb", but you need to get the gear and flaps retracted soon to help with the drag. This is as noted in this configuration it is not representative of the general feel of the 146 series, in the -100 the aircraft it just leapt off the runway in a rush, so as noted the weight and variant really count on the way you depart the runway. Very quickly I am in very much in love with the 146, as it is brilliant to fly, but don't ignore the fact it is a very demanding and complex aircraft to fly from JustFlight, there is a lot going on, and you have to address the details, but that also makes for a rewarding and very fulfilling simulation. Turns (banks) are smooth and clean, you very quickly tune into the aircraft. Moving knobs by pure mouse movement is hard, as noted using the wheel to get exact numbers is far better and easier, also the AP pop-up is hard to use. Getting it up on screen the menu gives you all three windows, of which two have to be removed (every time is wearing)... Then the AP can only be switched on from here and not from the glareshield panel... finally the V/S (Vertical Speed) is hard to use in one click increments, up or down, to just hold the switch down does nothing, but there is a trick!... If your climb (pitch) is correct and so is the speed, you can "Sync" them or lock them in to continue the climb by pressing the large right yoke button... The IAS selection also is another option that would then hold your selected speed (Airspeed Indicator, not a panel speed setting, because there isn't one), so IAS is more useful in the cruise than the climb. All PITCH, ROLL, ALT, MACH, IAS and VS modes can be synchronised without having to disengage and then re-engage the actual AP mode. The "Config" alert is still screaming in my ears and flashing on the MWS... what did I miss I still don't know, I again ran through the checklist, but something is amiss... I cancel the alert and it finally quietens down, but the missing setting bothers me, of what it actually was. But notable is that even the usual Course pointers have to set (NAV1/NAV2) and be split for it to set off the alert... its all in the detail, detail. So you soon realise there are a lot of hidden automation systems, the 146 is certainly no Airbus, but there are helper systems that can take the load off in crucial moments of flight, the trick is to learn them and then use them effectively. so the 146 is a pre-fully automation cockpit with early automation systems. Locking in the L NAV with the FMS flightplan is tricky, as you are a little in the dark of where you are. I well... cheat a little by using the Navigraph application to overlay my route (from Simbrief) over the map and use the aircraft position arrow to guide me to the right place to lock in to the flightplan, but this is a Laminar FMS basic limitation, it will be interesting on how the coming custom FMS will make these flightplan areas more realistic. The BAe 146 is an extraordinary simulation, but the workload is quite high to fly the aircraft Professionally, so it certainly lives up to the "Study" and Professional moniker. Note the amazing engine particle effects. Sounds are brilliantly good, but also seriously complex. There are 450 flight deck sound effects alone and recorded from RAF CC.Mk2 ZE701, with authentic flap retraction/extension airflow 'howling' sound... plus+ there are another 520 sounds samples in high-definition with accurate 3D placement. The volume is pushing the limits of FMOD 1.08 sound system with more than 150 sound tracks being played at the same time. So finding (annoying) alert sounds and even minor sounds will mean moving around the instrument panel and cockpit 3d space to find the source... super authentic, but another high workload area, another point to work out is of which sound is what, and then address it. By definition the BAe 146 is not a fast aircraft Mach 0.739 (426 kn; 789 km/h) Max, Mach 0.7 (404 kn; 747 km/h) is the usual cruise speed and the Ceiling is a low 35,000 ft (11,000 m)... but this is a regional airliner in the turbo-prop category and not a B737 or A320 classification machine. Considering, I am very quickly coming up on to the south coast of England... time to get ready to land. Like most regional aircraft the trick of flying them really professionally, is controlling the speed, and the descent speed control is highly critical, as is the final approach speeds, so you use the Airbrakes here efficiently to keep the descent rate speed down to just over the flap limitations in the 170 knt range. Set the rate of descent via the trim and press the "Sync" to hold it... this way is far better than using the awkward menu panel option, but you can do it that way if you want a more specific vertical speed control. One thing I learnt very (very) quickly was the throttle control, as the 146 is very sensitive to any throttle changes... ... nose down (too fast) or pitch up (too slow) is very (extremely) easy to do, if you don't get the speed and throttle power set "Perfectly" correct, then it will need practise to get it absolutely perfect to the size and weight of each variant, but flap set to 30º and your approach speed should be around 130 knts. Note the flap extention sounds are loud and brilliant at the same time, ditto lowering the gear... you hear everything, every movement to the final latch locks. If using the ILS, then the actions change the NAV mode from HS 1-R NAV to NAV for the X-Plane NAV1 selection, then select both the GSL (Glideslope Coupling Mode) and then V/L - VOR/LOC mode to lock on to the glideslope. Full 33º flap and your final approach speed is reduced to 120 knts then when acquiring the ILS it is reduced to 115 knts, but again to note that in a different configuration (lighter), I was able to do the same approach numbers with a flap selection one step higher at 30º, so the approach speed is relative. Keeping the speed perfectly aligned to your horizon ball, sounds easy, but you need to nudge the throttles consistently to keep the thrust correct in the right place to hold the speed... y ou really work in here with the smaller details of flying the aircraft skillfully. You are tempted to slight pitch up for the flare, but that is not a good thing to do, as when you reduce the thrust the nose goes up anyway, so you have to control the forward speed and so the pitch to have only a 3º touch up altitude rather than the 5º, three times I have done this and always missed the 3º bar, so I still need to practise a better lower nose down pitch flare to get it perfectly right. On reviewing, it's not too bad an approach, but I think I can do better... on the flare thumb disconnect the AP on the yoke, and let the 146 settle nicely... ... once down you pull the AirBrake lever full rearwards to get maximum braking from that split tail and huge lift spoliers on the wings... .... they are very effective as well, but there is no roar from the reverse-thust, just you silently losing the speed, with a progression of the brakes to slow yourself down, you can check the brake temperatures as well on the rear of the pedestal and switch on the brake fans if they are all getting too hot! Cleanup the aircraft and head for the gate, then do the shutdown list.... done. Liveries There are 10 -100 liveries including, Air France Express (G-JEAT), AirUK (G-UKPC), British Aerospace demonstrator (G-SSSH), Dan-Air London (G-BKMN), Formula One Flight Operations (G-OFOM), Jersey European (G-JEAO), Pacific Southwest Airlines (N246SS), United Express (N463AP)... The two Queens Flight; RAF Statesman 1980s (ZE701 – Queen’s Flight), RAF Statesman modern (ZE701 – Queen’s Flight) are also counted because they are -100 airframes. CLICK to ENLARGE! There are 7 -200 liveries including, AirCal (N146AC), Air Canada Jazz (C-GRNZ), American Airlines (N699AA), Continental Express (N406XV), QantasLink (VH-NJJ), SN Brussels Airlines (OO-DJJ) and USAir (N165US) There are 3 -200 QT (Quiet Trader) liveries, TNT Airways 1990s (G-TNTA), Ansett Australia Airlines Cargo (VH-JJZ) and Titan Airways (G-ZAPR) There are 3 -200 QC (Quick Change) liveries, TNT Airways (OO-TAZ), Titan Airways (G-ZAPK) and RAF C.Mk 3 (ZE708) There are 7 -300 liveries including, Aer Lingus (EI-CTO), Air New Zealand (ZK-NZN), Ansett Australia (VH-EWM), Astra Airlines (SX-DIZ), British Airways (G-OINV), Flybe (G-JEBC), KLM UK (G-UKAC) There are 3 -300 QT (Quiet Trader) liveries, ASL Airlines (EC-MID), Australian Air Express (VH-NJM) and TNT Airways (OO-TAD) ________________________ Summary The British Aerospace (BAe) 146 is a short to medium range airliner. Faster and bigger than a regional turboprop, but smaller than a standard airliner, and the 146 was manufactured from 1983 until 2002 with just under 400 airframes. The aircraft was offered in three variants, the 146-100, 146-200 and 146-300. The equivalent Avro variants were RJ70, RJ85 and RJ100, plus the QT "Quiet Trader" and QC "Quick Change" variant. Powered by four small Avco Lycoming ALF 502 H engines that produced 6,500lbf of thrust each. There was a standard configuration of 5 abreast seating, although a high density 6 abreast configuration was also available. This is the highly anticipated JustFlight version of the BAe 146, but not the is not the first RJ or 146 released for the X-Plane Simulator as that notion easily goes to the "Avroliner Project". Released by JustFlight originally for the P3D platform, the aircraft has been redesigned for X-Plane by the renowned X-Plane developers Thranda Design with extensive systems and performance enhancements and with more features than the P3D version. Priced just under US$75.00. The JustFlight BAe 146 is in reality great value for the category the aircraft is placed in. There are not only the three series variants of -100, -200 and the larger -300, but variants of the -200 QT and QC, plus -300 QT, -200 in a RAF Military QC airframe and two Queens Flight -100 with infrared countermeasures, count them, there is eight different variants of three different airframe sizes, and that is a lot of aircraft for just one package alone. The extensive manual is a deep 247 pages of systems and features, not just a system, but reproductions of authentic systems that requires study and operation... so the package is a "Study" grade and Professional aircraft to learn and operate. All major systems are covered from Fuel, Fire, Hydrolics, Air-Conditioning, Electrical, APU, Pressurisation, Iceing, Oxygen, Master MWS - Warning systems, Engine Air supply, Communication systems, Authentic Smiths SEP 10 Auto Flight systems and extensive features of Thrust Modulation System (TMS) and AviTab menu and intergration. All external and internal modeling is excellent, high quality liveries and lots of perfect detail externally, internally the cockpit is of perfect detail and immersion including for excellent VR (Virtual Reality), with moving armrests, chairs and even a pop-out third jumpseat. The cabin is although is a little lo-res and basic, but still better than the no cabin on the P3D version, QT Cargo has huge detailed door, and two menus service all opening doors, AP pop-ups, Quick start, checklists, TMS pop-up, basic weights and fuel loading. Both Internal and external (complex) Lighting and fully developed 3D extensive sounds are exceptional. Comments include no physical GPU (strange on an aircraft in this category), the mentioned internal Lo-Res and detailed cabin with no night lighting, and to note the aircraft is very complex and a little heavy on framerate, also the X-Plane replay is average. Finally is the built in basic Laminar Research FMS system is in reality out of place in this extensive cockpit. But a custom FMS system is coming (very soon) and as a free upgrade... and that installation will certainly make this aircraft an even more authentic experience. Certainly extensive in pretty well any area you would want to delve into, just pick one and be absolutely blown away by the depth of this Bae 146 Series from JustFlight. We expected it to be good, but it delivers extensively as a very deep but authentic simulation. But be aware, that depth of systems and operation, does require time to learn and be put into practise, there is a lot of areas to cover and a lot to learn to get the best out of these 146s, certainly it is no, drop in and fly (unless you want a lot of alarms in your ears), but again that is the aim of this very high level of study simulation aircraft, the skill level is high as well and you will need to commit to the aircraft to get the very best out of it... do that, and you will get an exceptional simulation in return.... Absolutely Highly Recommended. ___________________________________ Yes! the British Aerospace 146 Professional by JustFlight is now available from the X-Plane.Org Store here : BAe146 Professional - JustFlight Price is US$74.99 Features Include: Highlights Eight variants of the 146 are included: - 146-100 - 146-200 - 146-300 - 146-200 QC & QT (cargo) - 146-300 QT (cargo) - CC.Mk2 (RAF VIP configuration with countermeasure pods) - C.Mk3 (RAF cargo configuration with countermeasure pods) Accurately modelled using real-world aircraft plans and comprehensive photography of the real aircraft (G-JEAO, ZE701 and ZE708) Numerous animations including: - Trailing edge flap surfaces - Wing-mounted spoilers and tail-mounted airbrake - Ailerons and elevators feature servo tabs, and balanced, free-floating control surfaces which are affected not only by oncoming air, but also by turbulence, side winds, up and down drafts etc. during taxi or low-speed ground operations - All passenger, service and cargo doors use custom animations and featurr extra logic such as the auto-closure of doors above a certain speed - Windscreen wipers with individual left/right animations and independent speed controls - Distinctive retractable tricycle landing gear featuring complex trailing link shock-absorbing mechanism on the main gear - Countermeasure pods, HF aerial and more Cockpit A truly 3D cockpit environment right down to accurately modelled seat belts and screw heads Cockpit textures feature wear and tear based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Captain, Co-pilot and jump-seat positions are modelled with hundreds of functional controls, including over 200 buttons, 100 switches and knobs, with smooth animations, easy-to-use clickspots and precision sounds Fully VR compatible Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'engines running’. These configurations can be customised via the Manifest.json file. Custom throttle lever logic – fuel latch logic which is compatible with hardware (avoiding jitters due to conflicting throttle positions), cutomisable variation in throttle positions for added realism, clickspot for controlling all four levers simultaneously etc. Functional crank handles on knobs such as the altitude select and rudder trim, which allow for more intuitive, realistic and quicker operation Full support for command assignments, hardware and cockpit builders: - All controls can be assigned to commands, with tooltips on every clickspot to indicate which command to use - Parameters such as smoothing animation, number of positions, attached dataref, push-button depth, knob rotation multiplier, frame-skip (for optimisation), default position etc. can all be customised via the Manifest.json file, providing great support for hardware and cockpit builders. - Default commands for landing and taxi lights, windsscreen wipers, panel lights etc. are still respected, despite being implemented with custom functionality Custom features such as ‘hide yokes’ are controllable using default commands (e.g. 'Hide Yoke') as well as via clickspots EFB tablet with door and call-out controls and with AviTab support Sounds Studio quality Lycoming ALF-502 engine sounds, recorded from RAF C.Mk3 ZE708 Over 450 flight deck sound effects recorded from RAF CC.Mk2 ZE701 Detailed audio equipment such as the APU, brake fans, electrical circuits, hydraulic equipment and much more Distinctive flap retraction/extension airflow 'howling' sound More than 520 sounds samples in high definition with accurate 3D placement. Pushing the limits of FMOD 1.08 sound system with more than 150 sound tracks being played at the same time with no virtualisation. Full 7.1 surround sound support via FMOD, with 3D positional sound for VR users Extremely detailed external sound system: - Takes into account distance, speed, altitude, temperature and air pressure, just like in real life - Accurate touchdown sound based on impact speed - Multi-directional sound during fly-by and camera location on external view - Realistic runway roll sounds, complete with periodic bumps that depend on lateral runway position - Realistic wind sound that reacts not only to the speed of the aircraft but also how the wind is interacting with the fuselage (AoA, side slip etc.) - Realistic ambient sounds which replaces the default X-Plane sounds with a high fidelity FMOD sound system recreating the atmospheric effect, such as rain, birds, thunder etc. Interior and cabin sounds: - Passenger sounds, based on aircraft weight, which react according to your flying style. Passenger cabin sound changes as you move around, as if you were inside the real plane. Lighting Full HDR lighting with gimballed lights that can be aimed and dynamically illuminate whichever part of the cockpit is aimed at Independent lighting controls for Captain and First Officer Dimmable integral lighting for each panel, accurately dependent on corresponding electrical bus Dimmable dynamic flood and storm lighting for a highly immersive and customisable night environment (more than 12 individual light sources including entry, lap, sill and flight kit) White and red flashlight for night operations Accurately simulated exterior lighting including dynamic wing, logo and runway exit lights, and taxi/landing and navigation lights with different intensities Strobe lights with customisable strobe flashing pattern All exterior lights, including navigation, strobe, ice, exit, logo, landing, taxi and beacon lights are fully HDR with dynamic spill light, illuminating ground and scenery objects, as well as the aircraft itself. Other Features Comprehensive manual with tutorial, FMC guide, procedures, limitations and handling notes Payload manager for realistic fuel and passenger loads AviTab (third party tablet plugin) compatibleGoodway compatible Multiple interior and exterior viewpoint presets PSD paint kits included (free separate download) so you can create your own paint schemes You can take a look at the full detailed PDF manual here! Requirements X-Plane 11 CPU: Intel Core i5 6600K at 3.5GHz or faster 8GB RAM or more DirectX 12-capable graphics card from nVidia, AMD or Intel with at least 4GB VRAM (GeForce GTX 1070 or better or similar from AMD) Windows 10 / 7 / Vista / XP, MAC OS 10.10 (or higher) or Linux 2GB hard drive space Release and Review Version 1..0 (April 28th 2021) Installation and documents: Windows download is via an .exe installer does the full install and expansion of files in the X-Plane/Aircraft folder at a full installation of 3.63gb. Mac and Linux is a download File (no download size is provided). All updates or even downloads can be done via the Skunkcrafts updater. AviTab Tablet Plugin IS REQUIRED to use with this aircraft. Documents Extensive 247 page Manual is provided. Incuded are extensive system details, Procedures and Flying & Handling notes. Flight deck Audio guide and Laminar Research FMS Manual. JF_BAE146_Flightdeck_Equipment_Audio_Guide.txt EULAstandardcommercialandacademic2019.pdf FMS_Manual.pdf 146 Professional X-Plane manual.pdf Livery images were courtesy of JustFlight ________________________________________ Aircraft Review by Stephen Dutton 30th April 2021 Copyright©2021: X-Plane Reviews Disclaimer. All images and text in this review are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions) All Right Reserved  Review System Specifications:  Computer System: Windows - Intel Core i7 6700K CPU 4.00GHz / 64bit -32 Gb single 1067 Mhz DDR4 2133 - ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 8Gb - Samsung Evo 1TB SSD Software: - Windows 10 - X-Plane 11.53 Plugins: Traffic Global - JustFlight-Traffic (X-Plane.OrgStore) US$52.99 : Global SFD plugin US$30.00 : Environment Engine by xEnviro US$69.90 Scenery or Aircraft - LSZH - Airport Zürich v2 by Aerosoft (X-Plane.OrgStore) - US$27.99 - EGGD - Bristol International Airport by Pilot-Plus + (X-Plane.OrgStore) US$22.95
  5. News! - Plugin Update : Traffic Global v1.0.9997 by JustFlight I was thinking only a week ago, that it had been a fair while (August 2020) since JustFlight had updated their Traffic Global application with any changes or new stuff. Then straight out of the blue came my answer in a form of an update in a new version to v1.0.9997. There are of course two major traffic applications in X-Plane. World Traffic 3, which is far cheaper and more detailed in traffic than Traffic Global, but WT3 is also heavy on your system and you have to generate the traffic every time you want to use it... in doing reviews WT3 also didn't keep time with the constant changes that you do in getting the visual information as part of the building of the review, it would even sometimes also have a habit of crashing or freezing the work you were doing. Traffic Global is very much lighter on your system but also very easily more changable to suit X-Plane conditions, but also far more expensive, but in some areas Traffic Global is quite average. Aircraft on approaches still defy physics and gravity which I call "Dive bombing", and in taking off they don't seem to produce a nose up attitude (I expected both to be addressed in this v1.0.9997 update, but sadly still they defy physics). This release is a collection of fixes and improvements gathered since the previous release, and the addition of improved support for real-world weather including direct integration with ActiveSky XP. There are no schedule changes since the previous release since it does not make sense to update to current schedules with international flights being so affected at present. AIFP AIFP is a flight plan editor for FSX, Prepar3D and FS2020. Why mention it here? Because Traffic Global uses a FSX-compatible flight plan database. Unfortunately AIFP is very good at picking up working data automatically, and this of course doesn't work with X-Plane. Traffic Global will now (or can) also write files to make it easier for X-Plane users to work with AIFP. There is a full document on how to use AIFP with X-Plane, that is found in the "Resources\plugins\Traffic Global\Resources\AIFP Readme.txt", with details of some of the new features to help AIFP users create new schedule files. The changelog for Traffic Global v1.0.9997 is as usual quite extensive and a lot of the changed items are explained in the updated manual Changelog v1.0.9997 - Fix a rare crash when removing aircraft types - AI were not appearing on X-Plane's map if map integration was disabled - Add simple weight-based rules for tail numbers in Germany with possibility to add more later - Add ability to exclude specific aircraft and easier setup for AIFP. - Register X-Plane map layers if TG is disabled and re-enabled. - Updated German translation - Fix tuning of 8.33KHz airport frequencies from 25KHz radios - Fix performance drop with Flight Factor A350 and potentially others - Add option to disable Traffic Global when the "RELEASE_AIRCRAFT" message is received from another plugin instead of just disabling TCAS - Fix a rare crash when calculating taxi routes - Change the radiobutton appearance slightly to make it more different from switches. - Several aircraft types had incorrect wingspans affecting where they could park. - Enable/disable network settings if the dialog is open when the PC is switched between master/slave config. - Fix rare potential crash when loading certain airports - Many airliners had incorrect 'heavy' designation - Parking reservations may not be updated fast enough after moving aircraft to a new airport. - Aircraft may be created on go-around instead of simply further along the route when congested airports are populated. - Don't adjust the traffic density if the AI thread is getting 60FPS or more, even if the visual FPS is way higher. - Add on-screen indication of SAM and ActiveSkyXP status in Extended Info - After doing a full traffic reset, also clear all airport weather to allow flow changes to happen instantly. - Taxying airline traffic are better distributed on initial startup. - Fix a potential crash when radio-calling airports removed due to having no parking or runways - Performance improvement when drawing labels - Use ActiveSkyXP weather when appropriate - Optionally read METAR from disk when real-world weather is selected and ASXP isn't running - Add keyboard shortcut to fully reset traffic - Add ability to type an ICAO code into the flight plan view to zoom to that airport if it's nearby. - Gear-up animations have different durations per aircraft type - Fix duration of many gear-down animations - Stop GA potentially using airline parking when assigned on the first frame. - Flow arrows on the flightplan window would not change when the flow changed, until the view magnification was changed. - Add on-course headings for runways to flightplan view. - Improved workaround for multiple runways having no preference/on-course heading differences - Use icons instead of dots on the flightplan view. - Make labels work in VR (Windows only) - Fix a number of seemingly random crashes - Reset GL point size after use to help other plugins that only set it on initialisation - A configured replay buffer would always be 1Gb after restarting X-Plane - Could rarely have a corrupt start-time and altitude when creating GA flights - Fix occasional planes moving in a straight line at strange angles even in pause mode, after the sim has been running for some time - Write out a dummy flight school file if none exists. - Fix networked external visuals continually resetting - Fix Cessna Grand Caravan having lights offset from model centre - Add new dialog to customise GA generation settings - Try to reconnect to external PCs that couldn't initially be connected. - Pilots of non-prop GA aircraft (jet, turboprop) have significantly higher skill levels and so are more likely to fly at night or in bad weather. - Add Escape as a hotkey to all windows to close them. - Allow windows to be opened/closed using the mapped key even if a window currently has keyboard focus - Aircraft taxying out to a runway with a displaced threshold and multiple viable entrances could under some circumstances make the final leg of the route unusable for other aircraft. - Aircraft on go-around will clear the runway line sooner - Allow aircraft on runways to taxi faster - Airborne GA were located too close to airports when the sim started - Taxying aircraft could get too close on 90 degree corners - Aircraft on runway exit legs are waiting even though they're heading away from the runway. - Aircraft are still waiting for others directly above the runway on go-around. - Add radar option to exclude aircraft on the ground - Aircraft on departure or go-around could occasionally force landing aircraft to go-around even if the runway was clear - Reset button on the Label Config dialog did not reset ranges or colour. - Circuit direction (i.e. left-hand or right-hand) could be incorrect under certain wind conditions at multi-runway airports Compatibility Compatibility problems with the current versions of any of the following applications have been tested, but to be honest I have not seen many conflicts with plugins while using Traffic Global, but here is what has been checked: 124thATC, A-Better-Camera, Autogate, AviTab, BetterPushback, JoinFS, Gizmo64*, SAM, TerrainRadar, xEnviro, ActiveSky XP, X-ATC-Chatter, X-Camera, XPForce. JustFlight however do note that some versions of xPilot crash X-Plane on startup if Traffic Global is installed and TCAS enabled, due to incorrect shutdown of xPilot when it detects that the TCAS system is already in use. The intergration of the SAM Application is very much welcome to give the airport scenery a much more realistic feel, but SAM v2.0.8 or higher is required. Sadly it does not work with the Autogate (Marginal) Application. To update... For Windows, download and run the installer (recommended). There is no need to manually uninstall beforehand. For Mac, please remove the "Aircraft/Traffic Global" folder before unarchiving since aircraft names may change over time, and unpacking an archive does not remove files that should no longer exist. And if you have replaced your traffic file (.BGL) you will need to check the replacement for yourself; the traffic file changes with almost every release and will be updated or replaced if it is changed or missing. License Key is required to activate via the Settings Menu. Since X-PlaneReviews original review, Then Traffic Global has come a long way, certainly in quality and efficiency. The entry cost is high, but for those wanting a very in the background but highly effective traffic solution with a very light hit on your framerate, then you just can't bypass this excellent tool... Highly recommended. ____________________ Yes! Traffic Global v1.0.9997 by JustFlight is NOW available from the X-Plane.Org Store here : Traffic Global Price is US$52.99 The application is also available directly from JustFlight Requirements X-Plane 11 Windows only - For the MAC Version, go here Download Size : 1.8 GB Current version: v1.09997 (April 23rd 2021) ____________________________ News by Stephen Dutton 26th April 2021 Copyright©2021 : X-Plane Reviews (Disclaimer. All images and text in this review are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions) All rights reserved.
  6. Aircraft Review : Avro Vulcan B Mk.2, K.2 and MRR by JustFlight The Avro Vulcan (officially Hawker Siddeley Vulcan from July 1963), is a four-engined jet-powered delta wing strategic bomber, which was operated by the Royal Air Force (RAF) from 1956 until 1984. The Vulcan B.1 was first delivered to the RAF in 1956; deliveries of the improved Vulcan B.2 started in 1960. The B.2 featured more powerful engines, a larger wing, an improved electrical system and electronic countermeasures (ECM); many were modified to accept the Blue Steel missile. As a part of the V-force, the Vulcan was the backbone of the United Kingdom’s airborne nuclear deterrent during much of the Cold War. Although the Vulcan was typically armed with nuclear weapons, it was capable of conventional bombing missions, a capability which was used in Operation Black Buck during the Falklands War between the United Kingdom and Argentina in 1982. Aircraft manufacturer A.V. Roe and Company (Avro) designed the Vulcan in response to Specification B.35/46. Of the three V bombers produced, the Vulcan was considered the most technically advanced and hence the riskiest option. Several reduced-scale aircraft, designated the Avro 707, were produced to test and refine the delta wing design principles. The other V Bombers were the Vickers Valiant and the Handley Page Victor. The aircraft produced here also includes Avro Vulcan B Mk2 modeled on XH558 "The Spirit of Great Britain". Which is the last flying Vulcan that is flown by the Vulcan to the Sky Trust and the aircraft XH558 and is currently based at EGCN - Doncaster/Sheffield of which X-PlaneReviews covered in a review just earlier this year. The project here is a collaboration between JustFlight and Thranda Design, JustFlight with the initial modeling and design, and Thranda with the excellent X-Plane conversion, sounds, flight dynamics and systems. This is not the First Avro Vulcan however for X-Plane, there is an old FlightSim version that was converted to X-Plane and released as freeware back in 2014; Freeware Release : Avro Vulcan BMk2 by Daniel G and for the time period this Vulcan version was pretty good, but In reality you can't compare that aircraft to this ground up built X-Plane version, certainly not in the high detail. There are three variants of the Vulkan covered here, in the Mk.2, K.2 and the MRR Mk.2 Standard Vulcan in Mk.2 guise. K.2: Six B.2s were converted for air-to-air refuelling with the Mark 17 Hose Drum Unit (HDU) mounted semi-recessed in tail cone. The TFR was deleted. The Three tanks are positioned in the bomb bay giving the K.2 a fuel capacity of almost 100,000 lb (45,000 kg). The six aircraft were converted to used as an aerial bridge to the Falkland Islands after the War, as the Victors had by that date had more limited capacity and airframe (old) limitations. MRR: Nine B.2s were converted to the Maritime Radar Reconnaissance role, these aircraft came with the underwing MRR - (sniffer) Pods for taking samples of the upper air for scientific analysis and nose blade aerials. There are also seven individual optional equipment choices (done from the livery/‘config.json’ file) that includes: Inflight Refueling probe, Both 201 and 301 Rolls Royce Olympus engines (201 - 17,000 lbf (76 kN) thrust) - (301 - 20,000 lbf (89 kN) thrust), TFR Dome (Terrain-Following Radar ), Modern Aerials, ECM (Electronic Counter-Measure) tail cone, K.2 Drum Kit and the MRR air sampling pods and nose blade aerials. Detail In this price range you do expect great modeling detail. In fact JustFlight set themselves a very high level with their excellent BAe Systems Hawk T1/A, and a supreme high-quality machine that was... But they have done just as well here also with the Vulcan Mk2. This is respectfully a far a harder aircraft to get detail into, because basically the Vulcan is all wing, and not much aircraft per se... ... that full wing shape also created inadvertently a large advantage in that it also had a very small radar signature, In being a cold-war bomber that is certainly a bonus in warfare and the start of the race to create very low radar signatures on most current designs, with the F-17 Nighthawk being the most extreme example. The JustFlight modeling team had full access to Vulcan M655 based at Wellesbourne Mountford and is the default livery of the series, and that intimate detail is certainly shown here, but the aircraft noted is in it's current restoration state, and that is good in creating the right feel we would want from these old cold-war birds. So note the worn window surrounds and tired glass, this is not a new aircraft but a very authentic reproduction of XH588. It is all very well done. Gear detail is the same in aged, slightly corroded, but highly realistic. Internal wheel wells are filled out with great detail, so nothing is hidden here or missed. Complex, but original... the gear construction is first rate (so are the animations) with all struts and supports well modeled, and note the huge wheel well box sizes. That wing leading edge is complex with a big C from a modellers perspective. So it is very easy to take the easy way out and just do the straight wing, but here it is all the complex curves interacting with each other and the work is extremely well done. Wingtips are really art in the way they are created with such smoothness... impressive. Lovely bulbous tailcone is really again well modeled, note the engine exhausts that are neatly set into the wing, small details abound to again create that authentic feel, the Olympus engines are buried within the wings, sadly, but their internal shapes are well seen... .... again the tired worn glass of XH588 is seen on the tail, but this is a beautifully rendered tail, lots of shape and highly realistic. So the modelling overall is excellent and a great representation of this great old (cold) warbird. Note if the power is selected off and the parking brake is on then the Vulcan displays the static elements. They include engine inlet and exhaust covers, chocks, flags and the two pilots disappear in the cockpit (hard to see). Menu The JustFlight menu is to the left of the screen, the arrow tab can be hidden via a scrolling your mouse over the tab. There are 18 selections including the 2D pop-up panels: Checklist, Flight computer, Payload menu, Alternator control panel Secondary supplies panel/AAPP control panel and Autopilot control panel. And button selections for: Toggle cold and dark, or engines running (WARNING - Also totally resets the flight), Air refuelling hose (K.2 variant only), Pilot’s helmet sun visor, RAT deployment, (show/hide) ground equipment, (show/hide) control sticks, Deploy drag parachute, Instrument reflections, Window reflections, Show/hide the co-pilot, (open/close) Bomb bay doors and (open/close) Crew access door Checklist, Flight computer: Here you have a 16 page checklist that covers most aspects of starting up and shutting down the Vulcan. Second is a Flight Computer display that covers: Outside air temperature (OAT) – Celsius and Fahrenheit, Groundspeed (GS) – nautical miles per hour, statute miles per hour and kilometres per hour, Endurance – hours and minutes, Range – nautical miles, statute miles, kilometres, Nautical miles per gallon and statute miles per gallon, Density altitude and pressure altitude (feet), True airspeed (knots), track (degrees) and drift (degrees), Fuel flow – gallons and litres, Fuel used – total fuel burn (gallons), Crosswind component (knots), Headwind/tailwind component (knots) and the total fuel burn can be reset by clicking on the lower RESET FUEL BURN button. Payload menu: Next is an excellent Payload menu for easily setting up the aircraft of what type or combination of weapons and equipment you require for the mission. It is extremely easy to use (the menu looks nice as well) you can set your loads to match your mission. Choices are: Blue Steel... The Avro Blue Steel was a British air-launched, rocket-propelled nuclear armed standoff missile, it was built to arm the V bomber force. It allowed the bomber to launch the missile against its target while still outside the range of surface-to-air missiles (SAMs). The missile proceeded to the target at speeds up to Mach 3, and would trigger within 100 m of the pre-defined target point, it was a forerunner of the current Cruise Missiles. MK13 bombs: Three racks of Mk13 bombs. The Mark 13 is a nuclear bomb and its variant, the W-13 nuclear warhead. Mark 13 design used a 92-point nuclear implosion system (see Nuclear weapon design). It is a similar 92-point system was used in later variants of the Mark 6 weapon and the Mark 13 nuclear bomb design was tested at least once, in the Operation Upshot–Knothole Harry test shot conducted on May 19, 1953. The estimated yield of this test was 32 kilotons. WE.-177: The WE.177, originally styled as WE 177, and sometimes simply as WE177, was a series of tactical and strategic nuclear weapons equipping the Royal Navy (RN) and the Royal Air Force (RAF). WE.177A weighed 272 kilograms (600 lb), and had a variable yield of 10 kt (42 TJ) or 0.5 kt (2 TJ) and WE.177B weighed 457 kilograms (1,008 lb), with a fixed yield of 450 kt (1900 TJ). Both WE.177 A/B were flown on the Vulcan. With the JustFlight Vulcan you get two WE.177 nuclear bombs to play with. MRR-PODS: As seen in the MRR version above. The K.2 or MRR version is required for this option. Saddle Tanks and Cylinder Fuel Tanks: There are two 5,000 lbs of fuel Saddle Tanks available, these compare to the 8,000 lbs Cylinder Tanks used for refueling, but both sets can be carried. Other visual Menu items include: Alternator control panel Secondary supplies panel/AAPP control panel and Autopilot control panel. The alternator control panel features the following controls and indicators: Voltmeter and frequency meter for the selected incoming alternator. RAT and AAPP test push-buttons, used to obtain the readings for these supplies on the meters. Alternator selector switch, incorporating a push-button to facilitate synchronisation of alternators. Use the mouse scroll wheel to rotate it and left-click to push in on the centre push-button. EXTRA SUPPLIES TRIP push-button, used to trip any extra supply (RAT, AAPP, 200-volt ground supply) from the synchronising busbar. Mimic diagram of the 200-volt system. The diagram incorporates a voltmeter and a frequency meter to show supplies at the synchronising busbar, magnetic indicators which show continuity when an S breaker is closed and amber lights to show when an alternator is not connected to its own busbar. Magnetic indicators for the RAT and AAPP show continuity when they are connected to the synchronising busbar. Centrally positioned red alternator failure warning light (duplicated on the centre instrument panel) which illuminates steadily if one alternator fails and flashes if two or more fail. AAPP ON push-button. Beside each S breaker indicator is an alternator ISOLATE button. Beside each amber light is an alternator RESET button. NON-ESSENTIAL SUPPLIES TRIP/RESET switch, spring-loaded to the central (guarded) position. This switch can be used to trip non-essential supplies without releasing the RAT and to reset non-essential supplies once power has been restored. Left-click the switch to move it up to TRIP; right-click to move it down to RESET. Four KW/KVAR meters, one for each alternator; normally read KW with a centrally positioned button labelled PUSH FOR KVAR to read KVAR. Four ON/OFF switches, one for each alternator. The AAPP - Airborne Auxiliary Power Plant consists of a gas turbine driving a 40 KVA alternator in a bay aft of the starboard wheel bay. It can provide a 200-volt supply for use in emergency or for use on the ground when an external power unit is not available. On the ground it can provide bleed air to the cabin conditioning and air-ventilated suits. A Mk.10 autopilot is installed as part of the Military Flight System. The autopilot uses 115-volt AC and 28-volt DC. Power to the autopilot is controlled by a switch on the right console. It is a relatively basic autopilot, but missing on this panel are the direction controls in lateral direction and pitch. RAT deployment: The Vulcan is fitted with a Ram Air Turbine (RAT) under the left wing, that will drop down to give the aircraft power. Refueling Hose and Drag Parachute: Both the Refueling hose (K.2 Version required) and the drag parachute can be applied from the menu, both items are far more easier to activate than trying to find the switches in the cockpit. Ground Equipment:The Houchin ground power unit (GPU) can be used to provide electrical 28-volt ground supply power to the aircraft whilst on the ground. The GPU is parked underneath the port wing and is plugged into the aircraft just aft of the bomb bay. Also there is a Palouste compressor which is used to provide compressed air to the engine air starter motors, facilitating engine start whilst on the ground. The Palouste is parked underneath the starboard wing and the air supply hose is connected to the aircraft just aft of the starboard landing gear. Bomb bay doors and Crew access door: Both the Bomb Bay Doors and the forward Crew access (Hatch) Door can be operated from the menu. There are a few other menu items but we will look at them whist in the cockpit. _________________________ Cockpit The underbelly hatch is the access up to the cockpit... .... it is quite a climb all the way up there, or a long fall way back down if you slip! It is quite dark and foreboding in here, but eventually you see the twin huge Martin-Baker ejection seats. In the prototype they wanted an escape pod, a la the F-111, but that was seen as too costly and too heavy. Only the cockpit is modeled? The rear crew area is not in here, and so you are missing the other rear facing ejection seats and the pull-down 5th crew member seat, There are five member Vulcan crews including; Pilot, Co-Pilot, AEO - Air Electronics Officer, Navigator Radar and Navigator Plotter, and their rear area installed and their stations would have certainly added in a another dimension to the aircraft. But finally you are up here and into the cockpit... .... and how impossibly small it all is, on how everything is crammed into this small space and it is simply an ergonomic nightmare! But you have to admit is is a reproduction marvel, you can almost smell the musty tired leather of an old aircraft, lovely reflections come off the authentic gauges (did I mention the access to XH558, well that aspect is certainly on show here). One of the most interesting aspects is that once you have manoeuvred yourself into your seat, you can then pull back (pull up) the centre console with the fuel and autopilot panels attached by the rear handle. If we are in need to see anything inside this cockpit then we will need the power connected and switched on... Instrument Panels Obviously there will be a need to study the instrument layouts on the Vulcan Mk 2. JustFlight (thankfully) provide a very comprehensive manual, listing all the instruments and systems, so it is well worth your time in studying the manual and all the related details to the aircraft. Systems like Fuel, Electrical and Hydraulics are simplistic in a complicated layout, if you sort of know what I mean... so there is a need to work them out and of which button does what... this Vulcan is not your common Boeing 737, and throw in a military layout known as the MFS (Military Flight System) as well and so there is a lot to learn. Pilots main Flying instruments are quite standard, Centre line has the excellent Artificial Horizon (Director Horizon) centre, Beam Compass (heading) below and a Mach meter above. Left instruments are Speed (kts) and Altitude. Right instruments are Radio Altitude, VSI - Vertical Speed Indicator and lower a standby Artificial Horizon and slip indicator. Co-Pilot right hand side has the same MFS layout but with some additional instruments... these include (left) a ADF indicator, (right) a Fuel Flow Indicator, Total Fuel Flow (with reset switch) and Oxygen Flow Indicator. Middle panel is for the four engine instruments, which have that lovely post-war clockwork dial system. Non-Engine related instruments include: Accelerometer (G-meter - top left), Control surfaces position indicator (centre) and TACAN indicator (shows bearing to NAV 1 VOR). Note the MFS selector Panel (top right). This navigational selector has five positions: BOMB – non-functional REMOTE – the heading information is controlled by the default GPS Central (normal) – all heading indications by the heading pointer are magnetic LOC – ILS localiser beam or NAV 1 signals are fed into the system. The BEAM flag on the director horizon shows and the beam bar on the beam compasses indicates the aircraft position relative to the beam. GP – both localiser and glidepath signals are fed into the system. Both the BEAM and the GP flag show on the director horizons and the glidepath pointer moves relative to the centre dot to show the relative position of the glidepath to the aircraft. Top panel is: RAT release handle and the Engine fire warning lights and extinguisher buttons... below are the four main fuel cocks. Under are twelve warning indicator lights and doors (Canopy, Bomb and Entrance) unlocked warnings. Fuel in the Vulcan is carried in fourteen pressurised tanks, five in each wing and four in the fuselage, above and to the rear of the nose-wheel bay. The tanks are divided into four groups, each group normally feeding its own engine. A cross- feed system enables the various groups to be interconnected. Automatic fuel proportioning is normally used to control the fuel CG position. The Fuel contents gauges, one for each tank group, are situated on a panel forward of the throttle levers. The fuel switchgear is set just below on the retractable centre console, Cross-feed cocks and indicators are usable. The Bomb Bay Auxiliary tanks are controlled via a panel below the main Fuel Panel, and remember these tanks are also used in the air-to-air refueling system, so they have twin uses. Lower is the Autopilot Panel (Pop-up available via the Menu)... ... but these AP switches are used in conjunction with the actual direction controls in lateral direction and pitch that are situated directly under the throttles on the retractable console. Throttle Quadrant The four throttle levers are a work of art, as is the whole quadrant... note the built in engine relight buttons that actually work. To shutdown the Olympus engines the levers are pulled out and then pulled down to the shut-off position.... ... lower is the Airbrake selector switch, note the missing flap lever, as the delta wing does not require such flying surfaces. The really nice Control Sticks have four switches; Nose-wheel steering engage button, Elevator and aileron feel relief switch, Aileron and elevator trim switch and a Press-to-transmit switch, both Control Sticks disappear together either by selection or by the menu. Pilot's left side panels consist of (right to left): Oxygen Regulator, Radio altimeter controller, Store safety-lock and warning lights, Bomb doors control, RT2 tone switch, ILS/TACAN/ADF audio switch and TFR controller.... ... Audio warning isolation and audio warning test button, RT1 tone switch, V/UHF radio and the engine start buttons with Rapid start, Normal start selector, ignition switch, Air cross-feed indicator, Start master switch and finally the air-ventilated suits temperature controls. Lower panel are switches for; PFC and artificial feel start buttons (x3), Yaw Damper, PFC stop buttons, Mach Trimmer and Artificial feel warning and lock switches. On the Co-Pilot's right side (left to right): Oxygen Regulator, Temperature switches for Cabin, Cabin Control, Cold air unit, Ram air, Ram air Valve, AAPP air bleed, Cabin AAPP indicator, Abandon aircraft switch and Air-to-Air refueling panel... .... far right is the Anti-icing temperature gauges and Engine anti-icing switches. Lower panel are the pitot and external lighting switches - Lighting Master switch, Identification/Morse switch, Landing/Taxi Lights and Navigation Steady/Flash switch. As there is no rear compartment with an engineers station, the Electrical Panels are both pop-up: Noted both as ACP (Alternator Control Panel) and A.A.P.P. (Airborne Auxiliary Power Plant) which is an onboard Auxiliary Power Unit or APU. The lower section of the AAPP is a "Secondary Supplies Panel" or a continuation of the main electrical board. Other cockpit notes include... The Co-Pilot's station box (Radio) is right lower panel, and you have two very nice E2B compasses on each central window frame. The Wiper controls are hard to find, but they are high each side of the main instrument panel and are speed reversed, in faster first then slower in the third bottom position. Left switch is Pilot and central window, Right switch is Co-Pilot only. You have to remove the Martin Baker ejector seat pins before any flight (and yes the ejector seats actually work, so don't pull the handle?) The pins are positioned high on the side of the seats, and when selected they move to the side of each pilot on to the "Safety Pin Stowages" hooks panel. One option you don't have on a commercial airliner are "Flash Shields" or Nuclear FLASH shields. These are two sets of blinds set above the pilots and each can be separately pulled down to cover over the large circular side windows to provide protection from nuclear weapon flashes and radiation... .... the outer metallic one is still semi-visible, but the inner (heavy one) completely covers and blacks out the window, very handy to have when you need it. Flying the Vulcan Mk.2 It is known as the "Vulcan howl" which is a distinctive sound made by the engines are at approximately 90 percent power, due to the arrangement of the air intakes. It is a misconception is the fact that although the Vulcan shares the same name as the Concorde Olympus engines the versions are quite different, here we have the Olympus 301 were as the Concorde has the Olympus 593 with afterburner (or reheat), the only commonality is the two-spool axial-flow turbojet core... but it is known that the Olympus 593 did fly on a Vulcan airframe as a test bed for the engine (but not actually for Concorde but for the abandoned TR.2 Fighter). You get that lovely familiar whine as you sit ready to go, strangely there is not a lot of settings to set, no flap position, speed selection or altitude. But there is a lot of selection of switches to set like the ENGINE AIR and CABIN AIR switches, which you tend to change quite frequently... all selections are covered in the tutorial part of the provided manual. The Vulcan is quite a powerful aircraft (for the period). So depending on your mission weight it will taxi quite easily. Being in the cockpit though is bit like trying to fly from inside a post box and looking through the slot? It is dark in here and tight, it feels far more tighter than a fighter which will have that open glass canopy around you, but in here you do feel restricted as most Vulcan pilot's note... try this with a flying helmet on as well and then hope you are not the screaming claustrophobic personality type. The Beam Compass (heading) needs to be set... pull the knob (arrowed) out to turn the outer heading ring to your current heading. (note this ring will not turn as the aircraft changes direction, so you fly to the heading on the ring), push the knob in again to set the autopilot heading pointer. It takes some getting used to if you fly modern aircraft. You can move/hide the lovely armrests as they get in the way of the side panels, then check if there is oxygen flow... The VOR radio is on the left panel, you set it via the knobs and a very modern looking frequency, that disappears quickly. Time to fly, but the Vulcan is a past era dirty mongrel. The aircraft will gain speed very quickly and even with a heavy fuel and weapon load, rotate is around 155 kts at a pitch of 45º angle which can be maintained all the way up to the flight level.... .... and you really feel the huge lift from this flying wing, it will lift off anyway but you need to keep in control via holding the stick forward. Pitch is extremely pivotal, it is like the you are balancing the aircraft directly in the center with a very light nose and tail.... so you need to control the pitch movements with very small inputs and with smooth pitch changes, a few flights and you are usually ready next time, but it doesn't get any easier. Gear animations are excellent and cleaning up the underbody airflow helps with the handling and noise factors. The aircraft is surprisingly very nice under manual control, setting the trim is required, but it can upset the autopilot (AP) when switched on, so you have a choice... trim and fly manually or leave the trim alone if you are going straight to the autopilot. You can set the Autopilot ready via the switch on the Co-Pilot console and then pulling out the "power" switch on the AP panel, the white light comes on to show you the AP is active and ready. Level off and then "ENGAGE" then select TRACK to follow the set heading. You can select climb via IAS or hold the ALT (recommended). The forward panel then controls your lateral direction and pitch directions, remember this is a very basic 2-Axis system. The lower AP control are out of sight and too a point out of reach, it would have been nice to have had them on the pop-up panel with the rest of the AP controls, press the centre of the knob to lock in the trim... up or down is in 1000 fpm selections which are big movements in pitch. Specifications are impressive... Cruising speed is Mach 0.86 indicated and Max is Mach 0.93 (301 Engines), to note the early straight wing Mk 1 version was faster at Mach 0.95 indicated. Ceiling is 45,000 to 56,000 ft (14,000 to 17,000 m) which is high, but this is a nuclear bomber... Range is 1,500 nautical miles (1,700 mi; 2,800 km), but you do have the extra tankage available and that extends the range out to 4,603 mi (4,000 nmi / 7,408 km) or allow you to stay on station for hours. Getting up to 45,000ft is the easy part, then you have to come down again.... and it is a long way down without a decent Vertical Speed tool... ... helpful are the twin upper and single lower (originally double both upper and lower) airbrakes which are highly effective. Do you cheat by using a moving map to locate your position or try to do it the authentic navigation way, remember these aircraft had a dedicated Navigation Crew Member to do just that specific job. 3,000ft approach and the lights of EGCN - Doncaster are in the postbox slot... eh windows. Approach speed is around 170 kts but there is the known factor of a Pre-Stall buffet between 160 kts to 180 kts and that requires more rudder input in turns, but you still have to keep that tight, and remember the huge amount of lift this aircraft's wing can generate and with that also comes the huge ground effect reflection as you get down closer to the runway. Slowly you reduce your speed to around 150 knts over the threshold, but it is a fine line between going too fast and stalling... Vulcan's don't naturally stall in the slight nose up position, the ground effect gets too strong and they tend to seriously wobble on the large cushion of air then simply fall out of the sky as noted in a few Vulcan accidents, but touch down is around 140 kts. RAF Finningley (at EGCN-Doncaster) has a long 2,893m (9,491ft) runways as did all nuclear bomber airports, it is required as even at 140 kts as you fight the aircraft to slow it down. The manually operated airbrakes do help, but even then the parachute is still required to run off the excess speed. Overall the Vulcan is a terribly interesting aircraft to fly, and in many way quite different from your average commercial airliner... you must approach the Vulcan this way and expect time to understand and even plan each mission when you fly the aircraft, it will take time and study but in that aspect the Vulcan really delivers, it is certainly not a jump in and do a circuit sort of aircraft... it is a full mission aircraft with areas like said planned and be detailed ready from the start. Lighting UPDATED : this section of the review is updated to v1.1 that now includes large changes to the Vulcan's internal lighting. Before the Internal lighting was quite simple, one switch to light up the instrument panel and the side panels.... In v1.1 the side lighting knobs which were static before now work... The four lighting knobs are now active (orange arrows), but so also now is the functional swivel lights between the knobs, the swivel light illumination is controlled by the lower knob (yellow arrow) The same panel light knobs are on the Co-Pilot's side as well as is the same functional swivel light. Changed also is the main instrument panel lights which are now split for each side of the panel, the Co-Pilot's panel switch is on the panel far right (arrowed). The rotating knobs now give you two options, the original WHITE lighting or the very Cold War RED hue, it is very realistic... .... Main panels (separate) both side panels and the centre console are all fully adjustable individually, just like with the white hue. The functional swivel lights are very good as well, totally adjustable and not only for illumination, but also for compete axis movement... you can illuminate any part of the cockpit you desire.... .... turn the swivel light to light up the other side of the cockpit and it is highly effective, with almost daylight illumination. Externally there are options for ID Lights in STDY (Steady) and MORSE (Flashing) and Navigation lighting in ST/DY and FLASH. Three red beacons flash on the top of the aircraft or a steady in one single red beacon on the belly... navigation is wing and twin lower tail, strobes in the wings, in reality you don't want your nuclear bomber light up like a fairground do you, so it is very good... .... twin Landing/Taxi lights are build into the end of each wing and they are both retractable and have also been updated with refined functionality in v1.1 Liveries The scale of the liveries is quite impressive at seventeen, but many a registration are doubled for both Mk.2 standard and K.2 Tanker or MRR. USA and KIwi (New Zealand) and White Flash white nuclear test aircraft XL361 and XL426 are all represented as is XL426 in it's usual Camo livery... XM655 is default. Operation Black Buck had seven operations... During the 1982 Falklands War, Operations Black Buck 1 to Black Buck 7 were a series of seven extremely long-range ground attack missions by Royal Air Force (RAF) Vulcan bombers of the RAF Waddington Wing, comprising aircraft from Nos. 44, 50 and 101 Squadrons against Argentine positions in the Falkland Islands, of which five missions completed attacks. The objective of the missions was to attack Port Stanley Airport and its associated defences. The raids, at almost 6,600 nautical miles (12,200 km) and 16 hours for the return journey, were the longest-ranged bombing raids in history at that time. The Operation Black Buck raids were staged from RAF Ascension Island, close to the Equator. The Vulcan was designed for medium-range missions in Europe and lacked the range to fly to the Falklands without refuelling several times. The RAF's tanker planes were mostly converted Handley Page Victor bombers with similar range, so they too had to be refuelled in the air. A total of eleven tankers were required for two Vulcans (one primary and one reserve), a daunting logistical effort as all aircraft had to use the same runway. The Vulcans carried either twenty-one 1,000-pound (450 kg) bombs internally or two or four Shrike anti-radar missiles externally. Of the five Black Buck raids flown to completion, three were against Stanley Airfield's runway and operational facilities, while the other two were anti-radar missions using Shrike missiles against a Westinghouse AN/TPS-43 long-range 3D radar in the Port Stanley area. Shrikes hit two of the less valuable and rapidly replaced secondary fire control radars, causing some casualties among the Argentine crews. One Vulcan was nearly lost when a fuel shortage forced it to land in Brazil. Black Buck 1- Port Stanley Airport runway 30 April–1 May - XM598 (Reeve)XM607 (Withers)Performed; primary aircraft cabin failed to pressurise shortly after takeoff, replaced by reserve Black Buck 2 - Port Stanley Airport runway 3–4 May - XM607 (Reeve) XM598 (Montgomery) Performed Black Buck 3 - Port Stanley Airport runway 13 May - XM607XM612 - Cancelled before takeoff due to weather conditions Black Buck 4 - Anti-aircraft radar 28 May - XM597 (McDougall) - XM598Cancelled 5 hours into flight, due to a fault in the Victor fleet Black Buck 5 - Anti-aircraft radar 31 May - XM597 (McDougall) - XM598 (Montgomery) Performed Black Buck 6 - Anti-aircraft radar3 June - XM597 (McDougall) - XM598 (Montgomery) Performed; primary aircraft forced to divert to Brazil due to a broken refuelling probe Black Buck 7 - Port Stanley Airport stores and aircraft 12 June - XM607 (Withers)- XM598 (Montgomery) Performed My personal experience was with Avro Vulcan XL391, that sat at Blackpool Airport for years. I saw the aircraft on a visit home, but by this time the bomber was not in a great condition. Vulcans maybe prepared for nuclear attacks, but Blackpool's corrosive sea air did a lot of more serious damage to the aircraft. One aspect is that you could get very close and even look internally and the engines were still installed, but the aircraft was certainly never going to flown again... it was scrapped quite ingloriously on the June 20th, 2013. Summary This is a reproduction of the Avro Vulcan Mk.2, that was a 60's Cold War Nuclear bomber from the United Kingdom. Based on the last fully operative version of the aircraft XH558 "The Spirit of Great Britain", this same aircraft was used to create a very realistic rendition of this classic airframe. The aircraft comes in three variants with the standard Mk.2, K.2 Air to Air refueling tanker and the MRR - Maritime Radar Reconnaissance role aircraft. Detail and modeling is hugely impressive, so are the complex post-war systems. And the Vulcan comes with a lot of choices and features including the choice of the different Mk.2, K.2 and MRR setups via the liveries (can also be set manually), the range also is impressive in the liveries provided for the Vulcan's different mission roles including nuclear bomb testing flash white. Extensive menu is very good as is the choices of weapons (mostly nuclear with Blue Streak) and different belly fuel tank options. Sounds include the famous "Vulcan Howl" and are very immersive and 180º dynamic with 3D audio effects, atmospheric and distance effects and adaptive Doppler. Instrument panel, side panels, throttle quadrant and retractable centre console in detail is overwhelming, but missing is the rear crew cabin with stations for the other three crew members and importantly parts of the aircraft electrical systems panel, they are provided here only on pop-up panels from the menu? Internal lighting was also impressively updated in v1.1 In some ways the Vulcan is very easy to fly in a manual mode, and this flying wing has a huge amount of lift, but the ergonomic post-war instruments and 2-way axis Autopilot do require a lot of study and practice, so to fly the Vulcan in a serious mission role does require a lot of skill and practise on the airframe, but you don't doubt the authenticity of the Vulcan package to the high calibre and serious simulator user. Overall brilliant, but for the serious fliers only. _______________________________ The Avro Vulcan B Mk.2, K.2 and MRR by JustFlight is now AVAILABLE at the X-Plane.Org Store: Also available from JustFlight Avro Vulcan B Mk.2, K.2 and MRR Priced at US$49.99 Features MODEL Accurately modelled Avro Vulcan B Mk2, K.2 and MRR built using real-world aircraft plans and comprehensive photography of the real aircraft (XM655) K.2 air-to-air refuelling variant with Hose Drum Unit (HDU) and animated hose Maritime Radar Reconnaissance (MRR) variant with air sampling pods and nose blade aerials Many detailed animations, including: - Crew door - Bomb bay doors (with realistic deployment speed) - Multi-position airbrakes (accurately linked to landing gear position) - Drogue and main brake-chutes - Deployable ram-air-turbine (RAT) - Variable-speed wipers - Tilting main landing gear - Flying controls (including elevons) - Animated pilots - Retractable taxi/landing lights (with realistic ‘blowback’ above 180 knots) A range of payload options, selectable via a custom 2D panel: - Blue Steel nuclear stand-off missile - 1,000lb bombs - WE.177 nuclear bomb - Saddle bomb bay tanks - Cylindrical bomb bay tanks Ability to configure external model options for each livery – refuelling probe, 201/301 engines, TFR dome, modern aerials and tail fin ECM, HDU, air sampling pods and aerials Olympus 201 and 301 engine nozzle types Ground equipment, including Houchin GPU and Palouste compressor for engine start, and engine covers and chocks 4096x4096 textures are used to produce the highest possible texture clarity PBR (Physically Based Rendering) materials with real-time environment reflections for superb quality and realism Detailed normal mapping for down-to-the-rivet precision of aircraft features COCKPIT A truly 3D virtual cockpit right down to accurately modelled ejection seats and screw heads - every instrument is constructed fully in high polygon 3D with smooth animations Cockpit textures feature wear and tear, with PBR effects, based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Interactive engine start checklist Checklists for every stage of flight Panel state system which will automatically save the panel state whenever a flight is saved and reload the panel state whenever that flight is loaded Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'ready for take-off' Realistic V/UHF radio unit – save and recall commonly used frequencies Fully functioning magnetic indicators, warning lights and push-to-test buttons Numerous interactive animated blinds and visors Realistic flight instruments, including direction horizon, beam compass, control surface and CG indicators Option to activate flashlight from within pop-up window, to aid in those pitch-black cold and dark starts at night Option to remove window and instrument reflection effects All knob, switch and button animations routed through plugin logic, for optimum movement fidelity and sound synchronisation No detail is too small – even the option to switch between day and night modes on the landing gear indicator is included! AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS Numerous custom-coded systems: - Fuel system – fuel tank groups, transfer and cross-feed - Electrical system – alternators, Airbourne Auxiliary Power Plant (AAPP), Ram Air Turbine (RAT), synchroniser busbar and 2D AEO panels for controlling the AAPP, RAT and secondary supplies - Flying controls system – Powered Flying Controls (PFCs), Mach trimmer and auto-stabilisers - Engine start system – Rapid or normal engine starting, cross-bleed and Palouste external air supplies - Hydraulic system, including the electrically-operated hydraulic power pack unit (EHPP) - Oxygen system, including oxygen regulator system with realistic consumption based on altitude – watch the oxygen quantity drop with usage - Air conditioning system – cabin pressurisation and air conditioning, emergency depressurisation controls - Thermal anti-icing system, including airframe and engine anti-icing - Autopilot, including pitch and bank hold Airbrakes, bomb doors and brake-chute can be operated using standard control assignments for ease of use OTHER FEATURES Realistic and accurate flight dynamics based on real world performance and handling data Authentic sound set, generated using X-Plane's state-of-the-art FMOD sound system, including the distinctive Olympus 301 howl! Custom sounds for bomb doors, airbrakes, entrance door, switches, wipers and more, featuring accurate location placement of sounds in the stereo spectrum, 3D audio effects, atmospheric and distance effects, adaptive Doppler, exterior sounds spill in when the crew door is open, different sound characteristics depending on viewing angle etc. Dedicated pop-up window for sound mixing, allowing for individual adjustment of the volume of exterior sounds, in-cockpit sounds and various effects Comprehensive manual with panel guide and performance data PSD Paint Kit included so you can create your own paint schemes Interactive logbook panel for logging your flight details (X-Plane native) Custom external light logic with custom strobe light pattern and custom light halos for added realism Requirements X-Plane 11 CPU: Intel Core i5 6600K at 3.5GHz or faster 8GB RAM or more DirectX 12-capable graphics card from nVidia, AMD or Intel with at least 4GB VRAM (GeForce GTX 1070 or better or similar from AMD) Windows 10 / 7 / Vista / XP, MAC OS 10.10 (or higher) or Linux 2GB hard drive space Current and Review version: v1.1 (April 29th 2020) Installation and documents: Download for the Avro Vulcan B Mk.2 is 2.3Gb and the unzipped file is deposited in the aircraft "Fighters" X-Plane Aircraft folder at 2.37Gb. optional equipment choices can be done from the livery/‘config.json’ file. Librain (rain effects) plugin is required, get it here and install in your plugins folder: Click Here Documentation: Documentation consists of a 89 page overview and tutorial for the Vulcan Bomber, details available cover most areas including the complex systems. EULAstandardcommercialandacademic2019.pdf Avro Vulcan B Mk2 X-Plane manual.pdf ________________________________  Review by Stephen Dutton  29th April 2020 (updated) Copyright©2020 : X-Plane Reviews   (Disclaimer. All images and text in this preview are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions) Review System Specifications:  Computer System: Windows - Intel Core i7 6700K CPU 4.00GHz / 64bit - 32 Gb single 1067 Mhz DDR4 2133 - ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 8Gb - Samsung Evo 1TB SSD Software: - Windows 10 - X-Plane 11.41 - tested v11.50.b4 (fine) Addons: Saitek x56 Rhino Pro system Joystick and Throttle : Sound - Bose Soundlink Mini Plugins: Traffic Global (Just Flight) US$52.99 Scenery or Aircraft - EGCN - Doncaster Sheffield by FlyX (X-Plane.OrgStore) US$17.99 
  7. Aircraft Review : PA-28-181 Archer TX/LX XP11 by JustFlight-Thranda I know, I know... who wants another PA-28 from JustFlight, I mean just how many Archers (slash) Arrows can you have before it all gets way, way too much and not to mention that shrinking bank balance... but yes here is another one, and this Archer is the TX/LX version. "I don't need a TX/LX version", well maybe not, but after reading this review you then just might stretch yourself to just one more PA-28, because this version has a few nice and interesting features. To clear up the TX/LX designations then the TX is aimed at the training market and the LX at the private market, but both are essentially the same aircraft. Externally you would be very hard pressed to see any differences, as the TX looks just like your standard JustFlight/Thranda PA-28. Those lovely complex convex and concave curves on the engine inlets are all as good as on all the earlier reviewed Archer lll and so with the same NACA air-ducts. The lower under body fuselage shaping is excellent as well, if fact all the external design and modeling is first rate, but then you do and should expect this quality at this +$40 price... so excellent detailing and PBR highly refined textures are also a given, but it is in the details you get the quality for the price like with the exceptional glass... .... and the correct wing profiles. So externally the Archer TX is all very good but also very similar to all of the other JF/TH PA-28s. Menu The Menu system is the very similar JustFlight's standard box layout and opened via the left screen arrow tab, but there are a few differences on closer inspection. There are eighteen menu tiles to use including: Top row : Open/close cabin door - Open/close baggage door - Toggle G1000 synthetic vision - Toggle window reflections and interior glass dynamic reflections - Toggle dome light if the engine is running, or flashlight when starting cold and dark. Middle Row : Toggle G1000 autopilot - Toggle Wheel Fairings - Toggle automatic fuel selector (switches fuel tanks automatically) - Toggle fuel refill menu window - Open weight and balance window - Toggle sound volumes window  Bottom row : Select ‘ready for takeoff’ or ‘cold and dark’ state - Toggle checklist pop-up window - Toggle flight computer pop-up window - Toggle logbook pop-up window - Toggle ground handling pop-up window - Toggle chocks and tie-downs. Bottom menu selections allows you to change the livery Static elements include: Tie-downs, wheel chocks, manual aircraft puller and the pilot disappears. Pop-up windows cover the excellent "weight and balance" window which is very good, with weights for all four passengers and baggage (weight limits are very tight with two or more passengers aboard), fuel can be set here also as can the change from kg - lbs. A full list of weights, CG and a large graph of your settings are also all very helpful into balancing out the aircraft. The "Flight Computer" gives a load of performance data, including the vital FF (Fuel Flow) and Fuel Used. The "Refill Menu window" allows you to set the fuel balance correctly and see your Fuel/Oil pressures, Oil Temperature and current Battery Voltage, there is also features to simulate spark plug fouling and vapour lock. You can toggle the wheel fairings on or off, or slipstream or drag to which either you prefer, I always like the wheels mechanically bare, but long distance flying is helped by the less drag and better fuel consumption of the fairings. The worn and tired checklist is basic, but very good. There a couple more menu items to cover internally, so we will look at those later. Cabin First impressions looking internally is a bit of a shock, as the instrument panel looks a bit empty and even bland with the blank twin G1000 displays, the only additions are the active fuses (circuit breakers) lower right. It has become a bit of a game in what new internal colour scheme you will get with this particular JustFlight PA-28, but this interior is exactly the same as the earlier Archer lll in a dirty salmon lower trim and motif upper design, and there is here only one interior design unlike other PA-28 versions. Seats are nice and leather crumpled, with sheepskin covers that cover the two front seats that are really well done and feel realistic. Straps are laid out to hold down any luggage and I am warming to the motif pattern design... fine detail like the window surrounds are also really well done, and right down to fine chrome screw covers. Trim wheel and Flap selector is per all PA-28s in being low down and tight between the seats, and the fuel selector is on the left lower side. Instrument Panel Facing the instrument panel I suddenly noticed tucked tightly to the left side of the panel facia was a very nice Aspen 1000 Evolution EFD, "in a where did that come from?" but still a very nice addition to the G1000 avionics package. All the switchgear is on the roof brow panel per any PA-28 with LtoR: Start, Batt Master, Fuel Pump, Magentos 1 and 2, Landing Lights, Nav Light, Strobe Lights, Standby Battery Switch and finally the Avionics power switch... a note that the "Standby" battery switch is really the "Main" power battery switch and why it has a guard around it. both Yokes can be hidden separately, but they and the panel are boring after the very light lighter (brighter) creamy colours in the Archer lll. Turn on the battery power and with the three displays illuminated it now looks quite impressive... ... turn off the avionics power or have a circuit breaker fail and the system will revert only to the left side PFD (Primary Flight Display) with a "get you home" status, with the MAP and engine performance panels switching from the central MFD (Multi-Functional Display) over to the single PFD. All three displays pop-out on windows, but it is very crowded screen when all three are in use, so any combination of two pop-outs is the best solution. A couple of menu choices can be done with the G1000 system. One is that you can have the choice of having the G1000 autopilot panel visible on both the PFD and the MFD (arrowed) this switches the aircraft from the TX (trainer) to the LX version. .... second menu option is to use the "G1000 synthetic vision" or the forward view on the PFD Aspen EFD 1000 Evolution The Aspen EFD (Evolution Flight Display) is set up in here as a backup instrument, but you can use it as a primary one. You can reverse the positions of the both the PFD and EHSI if you need the ROSE function more than the main primary functions. And note there is no Whiskey Compass in the aircraft. Other functions allow you hide the speed-tapes and the minimum settings, but the MENU, 360 and GPSS functions don't work. The vFlyteAir EDF1000 in the PA140C was a more in-depth EFD version than what you have in the Archer TX as these functions were active. The layout and functions however are the same: Top section is your speed and height in the PFD (Primary Flight Display) and Artificial Horizon with a built in pitch and rate of turn indicator that also comes with both airspeed and altitude tapes. In the middle section is your TAS/GS speeds, OAT (Outside Air Temperature), Wind direction/speed and Baro. In the lower section is the Navigation Display with 360°/ARC heading, Left tuning dial (knob) is for CRS (Course) and IAS (Speed). Right tuning dial (knob) is for HDG Heading, Target Altitude, Baro Pressure adjustment. The colour setting system is in use here with Blue which is set and Magenta is for adjusting, the selection is changed by pressing the in centre of the selection/tuning knobs. Garmin G1000 system is default Laminar Research, the G1000 manual is not supplied in the documents but you can get it here: User Manuals G1000 features noted by JustFlight include a built-in Mode-C transponder and a timer function. In the air You feel all the weight of the gross 1148kg when you taxi, but that is not a bad thing. Overall the Archer TX is a nice aircraft to move around the taxiways and byways, easily adjusting the speed to your choice. Any adjustments on the G1000 PFD will be reflected on the Aspen EFD1000, which is a good thing because with the missing menu option on the EFD you can't change the baro pressure from hPin to HPA. I really like the excellent blinds that will drop down from their hidden forward position and they are highly effective in what they do. Considering the age of this TX/LX (current) version the engine is the very old Lycoming O-360 series producing 180hp, Top speed is still only 154 KIAS with a cruise speed of 125 KIAS, so you are not going to go anywhere fast, but still an improvement over the snail slow 128 KTAS to 108 KTAS of the Archer lll, which is the basis of the TX/LX Clean you can bite the air around 95 knts, and when airborne you have nothing but total feel and control, you could say the Archer feels a bit lazy, but I will put that down to the almost current high almost gross weight, but smooth it is and the machine is very easily controllable and I was already trimming out the pitch a barely 700ft off the runway, and to the adjustments the aircraft responded nicely to the trim changes and yes I was impressed. Climb rate and even feel is almost exactly the same as the Archer lll of 667fpm, so the 500fpm is still the main target, but the TX feels more balanced as I did a nice wide climbing arc away from KHAF (Half-Moon Bay)... ... because of the angle of the bank I found myself flying via the EFD 1000 instrument and not the larger G1000 PFD, it was a more focused unit and the natural thing to do, and I found myself in other various modes of the flight doing the same thing of using the EFD. So smooth and nice to fly are the PA-28 in this TX/LX form, and yes I will admit the feel and touch and available power is all very similar to the Archer lll, but with the far more modern instrumentation and tools at your disposal... ... but don't get me wrong, it was a nice place up here, and a really lovely aircraft to be in. A test of the "synthetic vision" feature is that it works, but personally I would not fly an aircraft like this, but in heavy cloud it would be invaluable, it is just another tool, but it works very well. I headed into a 14 knt headwind which soon turned into a 20 knt headwind and that sort of ruined my idea of flying to Portland, max range for the TX/LX is 484 nm and just over the 442 nm was what I needed to get to Portland, but with a 20 knt headwind? well that makes things a bit tricky, so I decided to turn back to KHAF. The current detail of the default G1000 is very good, not perfect and certainly not a total authentic reproduction of Garmin's twin display system, but still very good for simulation... but as I note frequently with the Laminar G1000 you need to study the manual and use the G1000 system a lot to get all the full details and the features it provides. Lighting The TX/LX nightlighting is very good. In the TX/LX all the lovely Archer lll illuminated top row switch-gear is gone, as it is now all black switches. But it does look nice and modern... two adjustable overhead blue lights give a nice cosy glow over all the switch-gear and the forward cabin, and yes it is and feels excellent... ... an extra three knobs control the Switch, Panel and Avionics lighting. The panel lighting is not just for the text, but also a slight effective lighting of the panel itself. The Avionics is for all the three displays, and yes you can lower or raise the brightness of all three EFD and G1000 displays. All these combinations can give you an excellent lighting feel to suit any of your moods, very good. Also good is the single overhead door light for the cabin, which is again highly effective. Externally you only have three switches, twin leading edge landing lights (no taxi light), Navigation but only each wing (no beacon) and wing white (rear) position lights, the strobes are very good, but a bit over bright. I love the Aspen EFD for setting things up like the course degree for RWY 11 at KHAF. Finding 20 knts of wind against you is slow, but 20 knts on your back means returning to KHAF is a breeze (pun intended). I was already eyeballing the Golden Gate bridge, so it was time to descend. Sounds are exactly the same as the Archer lll in being very good, FMOD and highly dynamic, but not say the best in this class, There is a custom-coded electrical system with functional circuit breakers for the avionics power circuit and secondary power system as well. The circuit breaker logic is linked to X-Plane's internal failure logic, so if the plane is set to fail a certain electrical component after a certain number of hours, the circuit breaker for that element will pop out. Arriving at KHAF RWY 12 and I can's see anything for the low cloud, even at 600ft, and another drop to 400ft doesn't help either, so I switch on the "synthetic vision"... ... the feature really helps actually. There is no detail of the runway, but I can see the coastline clearly. But I see the coastline, but not much else... my guess on the angle to the runway I think is pretty spot on, but the visual G1000 does help as well... .... but does the visual G1000 detect the actual runway? at this point i'm not actually sure, but suddenly I break cloud and I am slightly to the right of RWY 12. Once over RWY12 I can see why the runway was not visible earlier, the projection position on the G1000 is far further behind your actual flying position? The actual start of the runway is still being shown on the G1000 (arrowed), were as I am obviously over the threshold, and down on the runway the runway makings outside the aircraft (arrow right image) are still to be plainly seen forward in the display? the other way around might help, but in this aspect you will be well over the runway before actually seeing it, so this explains why I could pick out the runway further out... ... I hope the G1000 visual feature can be refined on this, because it is actually very good. Overall the TX/LX is a great aircraft with modern instruments. Liveries The Archer TX/LX has one blank and six liveries. Six American, One German, One British and one New Zealand. All are of high quality and actually very well done in design. ______________________ Summary The Piper Archer TX/LX is the current version in production (restarted in 1991 as New Piper) and is the modern equivalent of the original Piper Cherokee. This aircraft is the descendant of the Archer lll, but with the more modern avionics of the Garmin G1000 twin display suite, and an added bonus is the installation of the Aspen EFD1000 Evolution as a backup instrument. The JustFlight/Thranda version of the Archer TX/LX is in reality the JF Archer lll with the new instrumentation. Externally they are identical, even the cabin trim is the exact same design, but the differences are really cockpit forward with the above switch-gear being more modern and the Aspen/G1000 three panel display taking over from the old analog dials version. All the full Archer lll feature list is in here including dynamic FMOD sound, pop-out circuit breakers, comprehensive menus including weight and balance manager, fan and vent systems and various performance and realism effects... and the G1000 synthetic vision feature. As noted that in reality this is an Archer lll with modern avionics, so the choice is either the original analog Archer lll or this G1000/EFD1000 TX/LX package as the rest of the aircraft is exactly the same. I do think a more modern newer cabin trim detail would have made the aircraft a bit more divergent from the Arrow lll and the synthetic vision feature needs more alignment to the actual aircraft's position, but I still like it. Otherwise the TX/LX is another if not more to the current addition of the already large group of JustFlight PA-28 Cherokee based aircraft, and overall I really like it, but more for that Aspen EFD feature than the G1000, but that is nice feature to have as well. There is a deal that if you already own the Archer lll or another PA-28 from JustFlight then you can get US$20 off this Glass cockpit Archer... so is this another PA-28 to add to the collection, well yes certainly, and if just for the modern avionics alone. _______________________________ The PA-28-181 Archer TX/LX XP11 by JustFlight and Thranda is NOW available! from the X-Plane.Org Store here : PA-28-181 Archer TX/LX XP Priced at US$41.99 Special Features Model Accurately modeled PA-28-181 Archer TX/LX, built using real-world aircraft plans and comprehensive photography of the real aircraft Numerous animations including multi-animation passenger door that, when open, responds to G-forces and air resistance, baggage door, cockpit window and sun visors Ground equipment including chocks and tie-downs HD textures are used to produce the highest possible texture clarity PBR (Physically Based Rendering) materials with real-time environment reflections for superb quality and realism Detailed normal mapping for down-to-the-rivet precision of aircraft features Cockpit Fully functional G1000 PFD and MFD, and EFD 1000 Optional GFC 700 autopilot controls Realistic aircraft and engine systems indications A truly 3D virtual cockpit right down to accurately modelled seat belts and screw heads - every instrument is constructed fully in 3D with smooth animations Cockpit textures feature wear and tear based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Interactive engine start checklist that responds to user inputs and sim variables Interactive checklists for every stage of flight Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'ready for take-off' (if aircraft is stationary on the ground) Interactive logbook panel for logging your flight details (X-Plane native) Flight computer panel with useful information such as fuel burn, endurance, speed and wind speed/direction GoodWay compatible Option to activate flashlight from within pop-up window, to aid in those pitch-black cold and dark starts at night Option to remove window and instrument reflection effects Animated toe brakes Functional throttle quadrant tensioning system Radio knob animations routed through plugin logic, for optimum movement fidelity and sound synchronisation Aircraft systems Custom-coded fuel system, including the option of automatic fuel tank switching for use on those long distance cross-country flights (this option is remembered for future flights) Custom-coded electrical system with functional circuit breakers, avionics power circuit and secondary power system. Circuit breaker logic is linked to X-Plane's internal failure logic, so if the plane is set to fail a certain electrical component after a certain number of hours, the circuit breaker for that element will pop out. Realistic landing gear with slow/fast tyre rotation animation (blurry when rotating fast), precise shock absorber animation and wheel chocks and tie-downs Dedicated interactive engine pop-up window displaying values such as fuel tank weights and imbalance, fuel pressure, oil pressure, oil temperature, battery charge (with quick charge option), and information about spark plug fouling and vapour lock condition Simulated vapour lock condition, with warning pop-up and suggested actions Simulated spark plug fouling condition, with indication of percentage of fouling Lighting system includes separate lighting control for gauges (via rheostat) Simulated fan and vent system with realistic blower sounds (linked to circuit breaker logic and electrical system for realism) Custom external light logic with custom strobe light pattern and custom light halos for added realism Liveries The Archer TX is supplied with six liveries: G-IBEA (UK), N752ND (USA), N280HG (USA), N667LB (USA), D-EKKP (Germany), ZK-LJX (New Zealand) Other features Realistic and accurate flight dynamics based on real-world performance and handling data, and input from PA28 pilots Authentic sound set, generated using X-Plane's state-of-the-art FMOD sound system Custom sounds for switches, doors, warnings and more, featuring accurate location placement of sounds in the stereo spectrum, 3D audio effects, atmospheric effects, adaptive Doppler, exterior sounds spill in when window or door(s) are opened, different sound characteristics depending on viewing angle etc. Comprehensive manual with panel guide and performance data PSD Paint Kit included so you can create your own paint schemes Dedicated pop-up window for sound mixing, allowing for individual adjustment of the volume of exterior sounds, in-cockpit sounds and various effects Custom weight and balance manager window Requirements X-Plane 11 Windows, Mac or Linux 4GB VRAM Minimum - 8GB+ VRAM Recommended Current and Review version: 1.0 (December 16th 2019) PS: Owners of any the PA28-181 Archer III by JustFlight can purchase this new Archer III with a $20 discount . Find your coupon code under your Arrow invoice at the store (doesn't apply to other P28-181s or Arrows from other designers) Download Size: 1.1 GB Installation and documents: Download for the PA-28-181 Archer TX/LX is 1.19gb and the unzipped file deposited in the aircraft "General Aviation" X-Plane folder at 1.22gb. Documentation: There are two manuals provided. The ODM is full of performance graphs and data and the X-Plane Manual is a full detailed manual of the aircraft's systems and layouts, a good if basic tutorial is also included and a paintkit Archer TX-LX ODM manual.pdf Archer TX-LX manual.pdf Paint Kit.zip _______________________________ Review by Stephen Dutton 10th January 2020 Copyright©2020: X-Plane Reviews (Disclaimer. All images and text in this review are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions) Review System Specifications: Computer System: Windows - Intel Core i7 6700K CPU 4.00GHz / 64bit - 16 Gb single 1067 Mhz DDR4 2133 - ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 8Gb - Samsung Evo 1Tbgb SSD Software: - Windows 10 - X-Plane 11.40 Addons: Saitek x56 Rhino Pro system Joystick and Throttle : Sound - Bose Soundlink Mini Plugins: Environment Engine by xEnviro v1.13 US$69.90 Scenery or Aircraft - KHAF - Half Moon Bay by Rising Dawn Studios (X-Plane.OrgStore) - US$19.00
  8. Aircraft Review : PA-38 Tomahawk by JustFlight-Thranda One aspect of reviewing is to find or filter out aircraft that goes beyond the basic simulation of flying the aircraft. This focus is to recommend certain aircraft to be used in a learning context. In other words if you are coming into a simulator for the first time and know absolutely nothing about flying, but want to earn your wings or basic want to fly an aircraft, then what is actually the best aircraft to buy to do this. So such a basic trainer is required as learning to fly in X-Plane is not as far removed as you would do in the real world, and we all have to start somewhere. Obviously the default X-Plane 172SP Skyhawk is the starting point, mainly because it is free and already included with the simulator, and it is certainly a good aircraft in learning the basics. But the point here is that the aircraft is just that in... basic. But what if you wanted to start in a more quality environment, and this is important, because in this higher level of detail and functionality you do get a far more rounded and realistic view and feel of a real aircraft in detail and more importantly in better dynamics... yes you are paying for that aspect of course, but I believe it is an important point. But even at this level then the aircraft has to still deliver the basics, in feel, reaction and control adjustment. So an entry level aircraft is an important choice, and as I am in a different position in being able to review a lot of aircraft, I can steer the inexperienced in the right direction so they get the details right the first time and if their experience is a realistic and rewarding one, then they are more likely to enjoy and learn more of simulation. The biggest problem with an entry into simulation is that it is like facing a smorgasbord of food, there is a lot it and you can eat everything... but the initial experience is very important, and get the wrong aircraft and you can get seriously overwhelmed technically, but more importantly is the fact that many aircraft are actually quite hard to fly, well not so much in the actual flying aspect, but in the set up, loading and trimming aspect. And if you get that wrong they you will be in early trouble in trying to fly the aircraft correctly, so you have to start at the bottom and the with the basics. Which brings us to the JustFlight PA-38 Tomahawk. JustFlight already have released one aircraft that fills out already the high criteria of a "Good entry Level Trainer" with their Cessna 152 ll by JustFlight Thranda (review) which was an exceptional entry level trainer, but here we have another in the Tomahawk, it is if a more sporty machine than the high-wing 110 hp (82 kW) C152, and the Tomahawk is also slightly more powerful 112 hp (84 kW) (yes all of 2 hp) but a more streamlined low-wing and effective high-elevator design. The PA-38 is a direct competitor to the C150/152 because it was created by Piper to compete directly in the same trainer/twin seater market. Piper widely surveyed flight instructors for their input into the trainer design. Instructors requested a more spinnable aircraft for training purposes, since other two-place trainers such as the Cessna 150 and 152 were designed to spontaneously fly out of a spin. The Tomahawk's NASA GA(W)-1 Whitcomb airfoil addresses this requirement by making specific pilot input necessary in recovering from spins, thus allowing pilots to develop proficiency in dealing with spin recovery. The design is a sweet if perfect trainer aircraft. The quality is certainly in that high HD detail depth you expect from a $40+ reproduction. All latches door hinges and engine cowling tie-downs are great items designs, but the front cowling looks like it can be removed to see the internal Avco Lycoming O-235-L2C air-cooled flat-four piston engine... but it can't which is a real disappointment, and should that sort of detail be available on a $40+ priced aircraft... yes maybe. Note the lovely 2-bladed Sensenich metal fixed-pitch propeller and spinner. There is the high normal mapping for down-to-the-rivet precision of aircraft features and accurate simulation of waves in the aluminium plates. Side fuselage NACA ducts are perfectly designed, as is the lovely wing fuel caps and installation detail. All aerodynamic surfaces are excellent and the detail is right down to excellent wing-tip lighting assemblies and the 1983 mandated additional pair of "Stall Strips" added to the inboard and outboard leading edge of the PA-38 wing to "standardize and improve the stall characteristics", here on the leading edge they are clearly seen. Rear tail, rudder and high T-Tail elevator are all exceptional with the reproduction, note the well designed high set navigation light. Glass is top-notch in reflectivity, shape and has that depth of mottled tint between the layers. The landing gear on the Tomahawk is a very basic strut based tri-cycle design, and a very basic set up it is... ... but also beautifully well done here, note the worn and rusted brake disk and brake assembly bolts. Front gear is again basic but effective. Highlight is the LED landing light in the nose. External design and detail then is excellent, no flaws and all high quality. Menu The Tomahawk uses the same menu system of all JustFlight aircraft, activated on the left side screen tab (mouse scroll to hide) There are seventeen menu tiles to use including: Top row : Open/close both cabin doors - Toggle GNS 530 GPS pop-up window (or the GTN750 payware add-on by RealityXP) - Toggle window reflections and interior glass dynamic reflections - Toggle dome light if the engine is running, or flashlight when starting cold and dark. Middle Row : Toggle GNS 530 (see later) - barometric pressure scale between InHg and mb - Toggle automatic fuel selector (switches fuel tanks automatically) - Toggle fuel refill menu window - Open weight and balance window - Toggle sound volumes window  Bottom row : Select ‘ready for takeoff’ or ‘cold and dark’ state - Toggle checklist pop-up window - Toggle flight computer pop-up window - Toggle logbook pop-up window - Toggle ground handling pop-up window - Toggle chocks and tie-downs. Chocks, tie-downs and a ground pull handle are visible when activated. The animated pilot disappears as well, and yes he is realistic, but certainly not in the way of the better Carenado style human realism and I think here a trainee pupil in the second seat would have been a nice visual addition. The arrows at the very bottom of the menu panel allows you to select the livery you require and to do so far more quickly than the X-Plane menu. The weight and balance window is very good, with weights for both passengers and baggage, fuel can be set here as also can the change from kg - lbs. A full list of weights, CG and a large graph of your settings are all very helpful in for balancing the aircraft. Weight limits though are extremely low, so if you put in a passenger then your fuel load (and range) is then highly compromised, you can set selections of Half or Full tanks and the standard variable scroll choices. Interior JustFlight's GA interiors are some of the very best in X-Plane, even in certain aircraft they are even far better than Carenado's renditions. And you are not disappointed here, this minute two-seater cabin it is simply gorgeous. Worn red leather seats (always love the red) with a very nicely carpeted rear baggage shelf... ... all with realistic straps and seatbelts, note the really well done structure struts in the rear section, and the high detail of the door latches. Glareshield detail is excellent with worn edges and vents, whiskey compass is highly detailed with external temperature gauge is again highly detailed, as is the lovely roof-mounted door latch handle Instrument Panel For a trainer the first big surprise is that there are no primary flight instruments on the right trainee placement seat? Yoke detail and feel is outstanding, totally authentic and realistic, they both can be individually hidden, but oddly only the right yoke has the highly animated coiled cable? and as the aircraft is based on a real-life Tomahawk, G-BNKH, based at Goodwood Aerodrome with SportAir, then does the original have missing the same attachment? Instrument panel is outstanding in design and realism, I really love the texture and detail. The Standard Six (SS) flying instruments are front and centre... Airspeed Indicator, Artificial Horizon and the Attitude Indicator are on the top row and the Turn Coordinator, Heading Dial/Course and Vertical Speed Indicators set out directly below. Left of the SS is a clock, and far right is an VOR OBS (Nav2) dial (SL30), below is a large Tachometer RPM gauge, but it is mostly hidden by the yoke. Mid-Console are the two fuel gauges (15 US Gal per tank) and selector. Throttle and Mixture levers are each side. Right lower panel are four gauges covering Ammmeter, Oil Temperature, Fuel Pressure and Oil Pressure, instrument panel lighting is below. Far right is a full working circuit breaker panel. All electrical switchgear is right panel. Avionics are quite light. Top is a Garmin GMA 340 Audio Panel, Garmin SL30 COMM1/NAV1 radio, Garmin SL40 COMM2/NAV2 radio and lower a Garmin GTX 328 Transponder... the SL30, SL40 and the GTX 328 panels pop-out, although the GTX is of a different default window than the two radios. The GTN750 payware add-on by RealityXP can also be installed replacing the GMA 328, SL30 and GTX transponder leaving only the SL40 visible. On the menu you can select the X-Plane GNS 530 to be inserted into the right panel side, the menu buttons are a bit confusing because one (row two) switches the unit, but the top row (third) will pop it out, but this doesn't work if the GNS is not showing, then just press the unit anyway to pop it out. Air vents are beautifully crafted and animated to open and rotate, very impressive... ... under panel detail with the lovely branded rudder pedals is all very good, but... the under panel point the pedal linkages that go into the instrument panel are quite under developed, and the ends of the linkages will show badly (in mid air) if in the full yaw position and the point of contact is just a plain/blank panel, so you have all this extensive detail but this is so average under here, yes it is hidden in a normal seating position, but it could have been finished off just a little bit better than this. Flap handle is on the long console (Up - Half - Full) with the pitch trim wheel (arrowed) that is set behind, now after me "the trim wheel is my best friend". Flying the Tomahawk Starting the PA-38 is quite easy, but it must want to like you... Avionics SL30 and SL40 and GNS 530 must be turned off before setting 1/4 throttle and 3/4 mixture, fuel pump on (it makes a very annoying noise) then turn the key to start, once running then let the aircraft warm up and settle before idling the throttle (turn off the clicking fuel pump). You can simulate fouled plugs and battery drain, or not and if your really impatient then just hit the menu quick start tab. I found I had to click on and off the Alternator switch (twice) before the ammeter showed any voltage, which I found realistic. Turn on and set the avionics and your ready to go... Let us be frank in that the Tomahawk is a very simple and easy aircraft to fly, there are no wizz-bang details to do here, it is basic machine in a quality feel and use, note the lovely LED landing light that is really well done... ... taxiing is always for me a general introduction to the quality of the aircraft in it's controls and feel, so the first impression here is of a lovely throttle control (mixture still set at 3/4) with plenty of idle to thrust feel, this makes taxiing a dream, and in also giving you full control of the speed. So the PA-38 tiddler is very nice to handle around the airport on the ground and you feel from the start you have a lot of control over the aircraft. Remember to trim the aircraft to neutral, mixture to rich and throttle up for power. Even at this high (for the aircraft's size) 1637 lbs (743 kgs) weight it is quite sprightly off the mark, but don't give it full power but feed it in nicely, then when confident give the Tomahawk full throttle... .... there is a slight asymmetrical yaw left, but nothing to counter heavily and the Tomahawk is very easily kept to the centreline, takeoff distance is around 1,460 ft (450 m) At around 70 knts you can pitch slightly back for flight, not too much but 4º to 6º and find a 500 fpm climbout rate, Rate of climb is noted at 718 ft/min (3.65 m/s), so 500 fpm is about right with a speed set to around 80 knts. The Tomahawk is super, super nice to fly, very simple and supremely balanced. very little stick or rudder movements are required... ... any banks or turns are a flow of instinct between the rudder and stick movements, but you have to be aware of a pitch drop as you go into the turn, and the need to smoothly counter that.... .... once level and at your altitude you now need to trim the aircraft, in adjusting the pitch trim wheel to counter the pitch to neutral. There is no rudder or bank trim on the PA-38 so even with the aircraft neutral in pitch trim there will always be a tendency to drift left and the left wing will bank down, so you have to slightly counter that with a little right stick, otherwise the PA-38 tiddler will cruise along quite nicely all day with a minimum of effort... Maximum speed is 126 mph (203 km/h, 109 kn) at sea level and an efficient cruise speed is around 115 mph (185 km/h, 100 kn) at 10,500 ft (3,200 m) (65% power), Range with full tanks is 539 mi (867 km, 468 nmi) at 10,500 ft (3,200 m) (65% power) and a full service ceiling is a surprising 13,000 ft (4,000 m)... but good luck on getting up there quickly. It is all basic flying, stick, rudder and trim stuff, but also absolutely great for easy learning on how to fly and control an aircraft. There are no auto helpers and it is all VFR flying as well, but you do have VOR2 if you want to use that. It would be very easy to be lulled into a false sense of security. Taking off, and even flying the little Tomahawk is quite easy, as all trainers are... ... but landing as in any aircraft still requires skill, to me it is easy, as with constant practice and learning have over the years have finely tuned my skills, so to land the Tomahawk is a doddle... easy. So practice and learning techniques is important, circuits and speeds are the most decisive and the trick is to use the tools made available to you. Here in the PA-38 I particularly liked the V marker on the upper Artificial Horizon - Rate of Turn. It allows you to make perfect banks and turns and mostly 90º circuits to make approaches look very professional, in the straight ahead position you tune into the centre O point So the tools are there, so you need to use them, I do wish though the Tomahawk came with a course pointer, I like to set it to the direction of the runway to set out the angle of the circuits. The Heading Dial can of course be adjusted, but a yellow course pointer to me is the better option. Sounds are from the original doner G-BNKH PA-38 and right down to the noisy fuel pump, so they are exceptional and FMOD in aural dynamics. So a approach speed of 80 knts and down to 70 knts with the full flap extended is perfect, I do have a significant crosswind, so I have to do the approach in that context... one thing to note though is that if you reduce the throttle it puts your fine tuned trim out as well, but you can adjust for that margin with the stick and a little bit of pitch and when level again the trim will resume it's set position. Lowering the speed down to 65 knts will give you nice slow descent towards the runway... ... slight pitch to rub off the speed to slide smoothly into the flare... ... in the flare (slightly nose up) your speed should be around 58 knts on touchdown, and I make it look easy, but remember I also had to counter that crosswind (rudder) and keep the aircraft steady and level before allowing the Tomahawk to drift down to the runway surface... stall is 56.5 mph (90.9 km/h, 49.1 kn) (flaps down) or 50 knts so you don't let the speed drop more than 60 knts on the approach. Yes the PA-38 is an absolute doddle to fly and even land, so it is absolutely the best aircraft to learn your first few flights in, so all you need to do then is add in the practise of circuits to the repeated touch and goes. Nightlighting As expected the lighting is pretty basic, but it is very good. Both instruments and avionics lighting can be adjusted, and there is a good overhead light that is well done (menu). All instruments are sharp and clear. Externally there is that nice LED nose light, red/green and white tail navigation lights (tail light has a nice glass reflection) and bright wing strobes. Rain Effects The Tomahawk comes with the Librain (Rain) effect application and it is very highly effective here. As the PA-38 has a lot of glass area (certainly to the rear) and that makes it all very realistic. More so is you don't have wipers on takeoff or landing which can be very, very realistic and hard to see though the murk until it clears.. Liveries There is one white/blank and ten brand liveries. All are of high quality, but there are a few oddities... one Canadian register has a German flag, and the British Airways trainer is registered in France? But overall there is some nice designs in the collection and G-BNKH (donor aircraft) is also noted _________________________ Summary The PA-38 Tomahawk was created as a direct competitor by Piper to the dominance of the Cessna 150/152 in the twin-seater trainer market. The PA-38 is what it is, in a basic VFR flightline trainer, so there are no big feature lists here for avionics, autopilots and navigation tools. Directly targeted at pilots to learn to fly in, it is also an exceptional starter aircraft for the same entry level into quality simulation flying. Yes you could fly a default X-Plane aircraft like the C172SP, but this is a far more detailed and refined aircraft to get your first feel to what simulation is really all about. Even for the experienced flyer they will also take a lot away from this aircraft as well in the shear pure context of flying a basic and very if excellent feel and handing aircraft. Design and detail is exceptional externally and internally for the aircraft, and so it should be at this US$40+ price, and in that aspect to note, in that at this price should you expect more features, yes the feature list is high... but noted items like say the opening engine cowling and modeled Avco Lycoming engine, extra pilot in the passenger seat, baggage in the rear, opening fuel caps and even now a virtual EFB (Electronic Flight Bag), the PA-38 just seems a bit too featureless at this price grade. So if you would love a pure small twin-seater to fly or are even ready and approaching simulation for your first experience of flying a quality aircraft, then this excellent Tomahawk is the perfect flying machine for you... I found it an excellent experience and love the pure flying dynamics of this JustFlight PA-38 Tomahawk. ___________________________ The PA-38 Tomahawk by JustFlight and Thranda is NOW available! from the X-Plane.Org Store here : PA-38 Tomahawk Priced at US$41.99 Special Features Model Our most detailed GA model yet, featuring numerous animations right down to a vibrating ignition key and fully adjustable cockpit air vents Accurately modelled PA-38 Tomahawk, built using real-world aircraft plans and comprehensive photography of the real aircraft Ground equipment including chocks and tie-downs 4096x4096 textures are used to produce the highest possible texture clarity PBR (Physically Based Rendering) materials with real-time environment reflections for superb quality and realism Detailed normal mapping for down-to-the-rivet precision of aircraft features and accurate simulation of waves in aluminium plates Support for rain (requires free Librain plugin) Cockpit A truly 3D virtual cockpit right down to accurately modelled seat belts and screw heads - every instrument is constructed fully in 3D with smooth animations Cockpit textures feature wear and tear based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Dimmable cockpit lighting Interactive engine start checklist that responds to user inputs and sim variables Interactive checklists for every stage of flight Panel state system which will automatically save the panel state whenever a flight is saved and reload the panel state whenever that flight is loaded Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'ready for take-off' Fully functional and comprehensive IFR-capable avionics fit including: - GMA 340 audio selector - SL30 COM1/NAV1 radio - SL40 COM2 radio - GTX 328 transponder - Support for Reality GTN750 (sold separately, Windows only) Flight computer panel with useful information such as fuel burn, endurance, speed and wind speed/direction Interactive logbook panel for logging your flight details (X-Plane native) GoodWay compatible Option to activate flashlight from within pop-up window, to aid in those pitch-black cold and dark starts at night Option to remove window and instrument reflection effects Radio knob animations routed through plugin logic for optimum movement fidelity and sound synchronisation. All knobs, buttons and switches are configurable via the 'Manifest.json' preference file and have tooltip pop-up hints to make hooking up to hardware easier. (Just enable 'View>Show Instrument Descriptions' in X-Plane for tooltips). Aircraft systems Custom-coded fuel system, including the option of automatic fuel tank switching for use on those long-distance cross-country flights (this option is remembered for future flights) Custom-coded electrical system with functional circuit breakers. Circuit breaker logic is linked to X-Plane's internal failure logic, so if the plane is set to fail a certain electrical component after a certain number of hours, the circuit breaker for that element will pop out. Functioning carburettor and primer controls Dedicated interactive engine pop-up window displaying values such as fuel tank weights and imbalance, fuel pressure, oil pressure, oil temperature, battery charge (with quick charge option), and information about spark plug fouling and vapour lock condition Simulated vapour lock condition, with warning pop-up and suggested actions Simulated spark plug fouling condition, with indication of percentage of fouling Custom external light logic with custom strobe light pattern and custom light halos for added realism Other Features Realistic and accurate flight dynamics based on real-world performance and handling data, and input from pilots Authentic sound set, generated using X-Plane's state-of-the-art FMOD sound system Custom sounds for switches, doors, warnings and more, featuring accurate location placement of sounds in the stereo spectrum, 3D audio effects, custom atmospheric effects for both internal and external sounds, adaptive Doppler (affected by temperature) and headphone simulation Exterior sounds spill in when window or doors are opened, different sound characteristics depending on viewing angle and speed, custom external sound effects that are weather-dependent and engine sounds which are affected by user interaction (engine temperature, throttle position, manifold pressure etc), engine even makes ticking sound when cooling down after shutdown! Comprehensive manual with panel guide and performance data PSD Paint Kit included so you can create your own paint schemes Dedicated pop-up window for sound mixing, allowing for individual adjustment of the volume of exterior sounds, in-cockpit sounds and various effects Custom weight and balance manager window Requirements X-Plane 11+ Windows, Mac or Linux 4GB VRAM Minimum - 8GB+ VRAM Recommended Current and Review version: 1.1 (September 26th 2019) Download Size: 690MB Installation and documents: Download for the PA-38 Tomahawk is 655 Mb and the unzipped file deposited in the aircraft "General Aviation" X-Plane folder at 746 Mb. Download the LIbrain rain effect plugin (add into the aircraft's plugin folder) for use of the effects Documentation: There are two manuals provided. The ODM is full of performance graphs and data and the X-Plane Manual is a full detailed manual of the aircraft's systems and layouts, a good if basic tutorial is also included ChangeLog.rtf EULAstandardcommercialandacademic2019.pdf PA-38 Tomahawk X-Plane manual.pdf PA-38 Tomahawk X-Plane ODM manual.pdf ______________________________________________________________________ Aircraft review by Stephen Dutton 27th September 2019 Copyright©2019 : X-Plane Reviews (Disclaimer. All images and text in this preview are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions) Review System Specifications: Computer System: Windows - Intel Core i7 6700K CPU 4.00GHz / 64bit - 16 Gb single 1067 Mhz DDR4 2133 - ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 8Gb - Samsung Evo 1Tb SSD Software: - Windows 10 - X-Plane 11.35 (v11.30+ is required for this aircraft) Addons: Saitek x56 Rhino Pro system Joystick and Throttle : Sound - Bose Soundlink Mini Plugins: Environment Engine by xEnviro US$69.90 : WorldTraffic 3.0 Plugin - US$29.95 Scenery or Aircraft - KHAF - Half Moon Bay by Rising Dawn Studios (X-Plane.OrgStore) - US$19.00
  9. Aircraft Review : Beechcraft Duchess Model 76 by JustFlight and Thranda With most developers in that they usually keep to a particular category or theme in say all General Aviation, Airliners, Helicopters or the just plain weird. But JustFlight with Thranda tend to jump into any category that produces interesting aircraft, so can you as these developers go then pigeon hole them as what sort of developers they are. So from a review point of view you know that really anything could be next up on the release from JustFlight for a review. In the early releases they tended to follow the Carenado model (before Carenado went all regional and private jet) in other words the staple General Aviation market, of which was covered mostly with their various Archer/Arrows and the odd Cessna.... but all were solely single engined aircraft. So this is JustFlight/Thranda's first twin-engined aircraft and it is the Beechcraft Duchess 76, and the aircraft is developed out of the Beechcraft Musketeer family of single-engined aircraft family line, and at first glance you would be pushed to see any family resemblance, between the model 24 low-wing standard low elevator design to the Series 76 twin engined high T-Tail configuration and all round far larger aircraft in a 32 ft 9 in (9.98 m) to 38 ft 0 in (11.58 m) wingspan and longer fuselage 25 ft 8 in (7.82 m) to the 76's 29 ft 0 1⁄2 in (8.852 m) overall length. But get down into the parts catalogue and you would be amazed on on how many of the same spec are on both aircraft. Its main rival is the Cessna 310 of which there are several including Milviz's T310R and a new 310L that has just been added to the X-PlaneStore. Other references in this category include the PA-30 Twin Comanche and the PA-34 Seneca V. JustFlight are in that top category in another way in quality and price, they cover the upper echelons in all their GA aircraft are priced US$40+, as is this Duchess at US$41.99. So you are expecting a lot for your investment, and on JustFlight's past record and sales then the aircraft must meet such a high criteria and standard. I really liked their last machine PA-28-181 Archer III as it was a gem of a machine, so how would a twin feel, and could it be twice as good? I doubt that, but just as good would still be very nice. Nice detail includes NACA 632A415 airfoil shape, it is well done and shaped to perfection. Wings are bonded here for a cleaner airflow, but overall the detail of the design is first rate and very well recreated. The twin enclosures houses two Lycoming O-360-A1G6D air-cooled flat-four engines, 180 hp(130 kW) each, and through out the full production run 1978-1983 there was no updated or engine revisions, except for one in house turbo development aircraft. All minor detailing is also covered, note the lovely (working) trim and rudder assembly of that high T-Tail structure, and the really nice cabin vents rear fuselage and quality entrance grab handles, so there is not a lot to get picky about here as it is all really well done. All the undercarriage came directly from the Musketeer spare parts bins, so it is exactly the same trailing link layout and structure, all is expertly done in detail and animation, it is a complex gear system but fully realised here. There was a missing texture (and hole) in the left wheel-well, but that has been fixed in the update. Interior After the eccentric Bright Reds, Blues and Salmon colours of past JustFlight GA's this is a very different and sombre cabin of just different shades of greys, bland? well no as the detail in here is very good with the well done fabric creases and stitching, but you don't get the "Bam" in your face factor of the JF other aircraft. In cabin detail it is again all first rate I do however like the factor that the pilot's seat is more forward than the passenger's front seat, that works for me. Overhead the roof trim is a grey molded one piece, with just the speaker and cabin lighting forward... both shades hide two air vents which is nicely done, but the wires don't match to the window whiskey compass (noted again to be fixed). An emergency manual extension (gravity release) gear lever is set in a floor panel that is usable and active, nice touch is the lever in the door pocket. Pitch trim is situated between the seats and is well done, but requires help in key settings in a simulation environment (electric trim is available on the yokes), fuel levers are really nice as is the engine vents that can be opened, closed or set half way.... fuel crossfeed is active and the (working) Carb heat is here as well. Instrument Panel Again like with the other in your face JustFlight GA's the instrument panel doesn't have that 'wham bam, thank you mam" factor... even slightly flat, but look closely and the detail is very well done. Yokes are up close are quite authentic and gloriously faded from their 70's heyday, you can hide them and use the switch electric trim... ... dials are also rusted, dusty and worn out, with plasters even stuck to the panel from past use. Instrument gauges have faded graphics and the lighting studs are also well worn and even rusted from use. Instrument reflections are excellent in the pursuit of realism and overall it reflects a very earlier build of a Duchess than a last off the line aircraft. Panel layout is three layers of dials to create a deep feel of instruments... The Standard Six (SS) flying instruments are front and centre... Airspeed Indicator, Artificial Horizon and the Attitude Indicator are on the top row and the Turn Coordinator, Heading Dial/Course and Vertical Speed Indicators set out directly below. Left of the SS is a clock, backup Attitude Indicator and lower EGT (Exhaust gas temperature) needles. Right of the SS is a twin-needle Manifold pressure and below a twin needle RPM gauges, lower panel centre are two Bendix/King dials ADF (yellow) VOR2 (green) pointers driven by KR 87 ADF/VOR2 and the other is a VOR 2 / ILS indicator driven by KX 165 (NAV 2). Both heading and OBS rear dials/cards are adjustable. Lower panel is a Instrument air (vacuum) gauge and electrical starting and lighting switchgear with the neat gear knob. Top panel left is the label NAV 2 over the clock, very weird? Twin (engine sets) of six rows of gauges are centre panel, with from top: Fuel L&R quantity gauges, Fuel pressure gauges, Oil pressure gauges, Oil temperature gauges, Cylinder temperature gauges and Alternator load meters with Alternator-out under/over voltage warning lights inset (are beautifully done). Top of the gauges sits a DME indicator which displays range, ground speed and time to station for NAV 1 or NAV 2 frequencies. There are no instruments for the right seat pilot/passenger with the equipment stack dominating the area. Avionics stack is the usual Bendix/King KMA 28 TSO radio top which is above the GNS430 below (the Reality XP's GTN 750 unit can also be fitted and windows only, but this is an addon extra and costs you another $49.95) There is a really nice Bendix/King KT 76A transponder unit with a Bendix/King KX 155 COM/NAV 2 radio and Bendix/King KR87 ADF radio receiver bottom. Top far right is the Century IV autopilot which is (speaking to the passenger) "can you press the second button the top row, thanks very much" as far away from the pilot as reachable possible (there is thankfully a pop-up panel), and below is a WX-8 Stormscope. An outside air temperature (digital) matches the manual pressure left window type, and a Hobbs hour meter is far right. The circuit breaker panel is active and can be used and is noted in the twin-bus layout of BUS 1 and BUS 2, it is very good and highly authentic in use. Flap lever and display are below the avionics with 0º - 10º - 20º - DN settings, but the flaps are not section driven but are continuous in operation and so the degree markers are for display only. Twin Throttle levers, Propeller control levers (feathering on both 2-bladed Hartzell 7666A constant speed propellers does work) and Mixture levers are all excellent and well worn and feel nicely authentic to use. Menus The Duchess comes with the usual JustFlight pop-out side left menu, scroll above the arrow to make it less visible. Menus provided are pretty the same standard menu layout of all JustFlight menu options in three rows... There are eighteen menu tiles to use including: Top row : Open/Close pilot's door - Open/Close passenger door - Open/Close rear left baggage door - Toggle window reflections - Toggle Interior glass dynamic reflections - Toggle dome light if the engine is running, or flashlight when starting cold and dark. Middle Row : Toggle autopilot pop-up window - Toggle altimeter between inHg and mb - Toggle GNS 430 GPS pop-up window (or the GTN750 payware add-on by RealityXP) - Toggle fuel refill menu window - Open weight and balance window - Toggle sound volumes window  Bottom row : Select ‘ready for takeoff’ or ‘cold and dark’ state - Toggle checklist pop-up window - Toggle flight computer pop-up window - Toggle logbook pop-up window - Toggle ground handling pop-up window - Toggle chocks, aircraft puller and tie-downs. Static elements are "all for one and one for all", with not much custom choices or no engine covers, tags or pitot covers? Excellent animated pilot however does go home. 2d popup panels include: GNS 430, nice sound volume panel, Century IV autopilot panel... The flight computer panel provides a wealth of information that is very handy in flight with highlights including (time) endurance, range (available) and used fuel flow.... fuel burn can be reset. The Refill Menu allows you to view the fuel and oil status as well as the status of spark plug fouling, and you can recharge the battery if it goes flat, of which it does with regularity. The weight and balance window is very good, with adjustable weights for all four passengers, and baggage, fuel can be set here also as can the change from kg - lbs. A full list of weights, CG and a large graph of your settings are all very helpful into balancing the aircraft. Flying the Duchess 76 You have to prime the engines via a button in the middle of the starter switch before turning the starter switch, but it is a bit of a trick on how long to hold the primer button and not flood the engine, not a lot I believe... engine starts are excellent, but I found several times the No.2 right engine has a tendency to foul it's plugs more than the left one, if it does it is tricky to even hell to restart it again. The Hartzell constant speed propellers are counter-rotating, turning counter clockwise engine left and clockwise engine right, this is to balance the aircraft's thrust and it is very helpful on takeoff. Engine sounds are simply first rate, as they should be in this class... but more so in that they feel authentic and change through a huge range to even a deep gutter throb when close to idle but still under load, I like them very much. A fine bit of throttle while waiting with the engines running stops any stall, and the effects are shown on the EGT needles, you will note that will you use this gauge a lot in this aircraft. Both Attitude Indicators (main and backup) have to have their pressures manually set (yellow arrows above)... you can also set your Artificial Horizon marker to match the intended climb pitch (arrowed below)... Trim central to the takeoff T.O marker and you are ready to go... The Duchess will taxi at a nice speed, there is no fighting the thrust here in braking here and braking there.... so you enjoy the short ride to the runway. With no set flap degrees you can set the angle you want, here I go for 5º to create lift, but as little drag as possible.... the display (arrowed) can be hard to see at this distance, harder to set on landing. Power up and the counter-rotating blades keep you aligned on the runway, but I did find I had to still adjust each throttle (slightly) to absorb the different engine performance... but that felt highly realistic. Around 95 knts and your climbing out. Climb out is around 1000 fpm (Feet Per Minute) and that is a nice number here, officially the rate of climb limit is 1,248 ft/min (6.34 m/s), so you are using the climb to maximum effect, it doesn't feel like there is any strain on the engines or the aircraft. Using the set adjustable artificial horzion marker and your rate of turn instrument, you can get the perfect turn, while still getting the perfect climb... this is a very good tool for beginner learner flyers and to use their instruments to fly the aircraft well and with clean professionalism.... Once in KDAB (Daytona) left circuit departure pattern I leveled off at 2000ft and trimmed the aircraft. The Duchess will trim up very nicely thank you... I as noted still use the manual (keyboard) trim, but you can use the electric trim on the yoke, but to remember to switch on the electric trim version (required also for the autopilot) on the lower panel switch (lower arrow). Once trimmed the Model 76 will sit here all day with just minor adjustments, wind strength allowable. The Century lV autopilot (AP) won't work unless again you switch on the power in the same row of switches as the electric trim.... ALT will hold your current altitude, but to climb or descend you then press ATT and then set your pitch, you click and don't scroll the buttons to change the aircraft's pitch. The ATT setting can also be used just to hold your current pitch if you like that angle or rate of climb, so the AP is again very easy to use... you can really only use the pop-up 2d panel as the real layout is just too distracting a reach in it's too far right panel position. View out is excellent for a twin prop, yes the forward positioned engines do still obscure the view a little, but you seem to sit higher than in other twins so the aspect is still better than most. You go hunting for the EGT needles, the yellow needles represent the best lean to rich mixture for the best fuel flow and hence performance, you adjust both the throttles and the mixture levers to achieve your golden lean setting.... I found on the outbound flight it worked perfectly, but on the inbound flight (here) I couldn't get as close?.... unless I leaned the engines all the way to shutoff and too far. This setting is about right to the setting before, and I found the yellow needles moved back to their central positions the more the fuel burnt off. Cruise speed is 158 kn (182 mph; 293 km/h) at the best at 10,000 ft (3,000 m), Range is VOR busting 780 nmi (898 mi; 1,445 km) and the Service Ceiling is a generous 19,650 ft (5,990 m). Approach to KRSW (Southwest Florida) RWY 24 (rare as it is usually 06) means no airport circuit and a straight in approach from LBV (La Belle VOR). Height is reduced at 1300fpm to do the shorter distance landing. You can easily approach the airport at around 110 knts clean and not lose height or power, but on the final approach you drop it down to 95 knts with the first flap adjustment to 10º... you know instantly the flap drag kicks in with the low thrumming of the engines coming into play, I love the sounds they are brilliant in this phase of the flight, you adjust and the engine drag power sound adjusts to reflect the change.... brilliant. One thing has been renforced during this review of the Model 76 and that this is a nice easy aircraft for learners and it comes with a nice stable platform to practise on, yes the 76 is an easy aircraft to fly, but the pro's will get it as well... and love it as much as there is also a great built in depth in there. 20º flap (more thrumming!) 90 knts.... Full flap (dirty) and 80 knts is nice! Then gradually reduce the power to 75 knts to 73 knts then a slight pitch and you are touching down.... easy. The timing of the final pitch has to be perfect, to early and the 76 will slightly float, if right then a nice easy fall onto the runway and if the trim is right the aircraft is seemless in it's landing operational phase. Stall is 60 knts and a "no go there!" Run off the speed and then head for the parc ferme. Miss those "just chocks" and the non-choice all for one static elements, so I don't use any? Lighting Both internal and external lighting is quite basic... panel has only two adjustments in instruments (noted as "Post Lights") and Instrument flood. But you can find that nice night time flying sweetspot. However the worn graphics engine readouts look like early washed out X-Plane 2d panel, and have no depth, but otherwise the panel looks good. Overhead light (and red torch) selection does not work? (yes it will be fixed) but that also gives you a very unusable dark cabin? External lighting is basic, but very good.... navigation and strobe lights are well done, but there is no beacon. Taxilights and landing lights are situated at each wing outer leading edge, but the taxilights are a bit weak on the ground, in reality you need to use the stronger landing lights to find your way around the taxiways. Liveries Eleven Duchess liveries and a blank white are mostly focused on Europe with a few that are UK registered, The US of A gets one, so does Canada and one for Australia. All are 4K extreme top quality. ___________________________________ Summary The Duchess Model 76 is the first twin-engined General Aviation aircraft by JustFlight/Thranda for X-Plane after a procession of single-engined Arrows and Archers. The price range in the early forties is the same and so is mostly the features and details. First immersion with the aircraft found the Model 76 a bit bland, a grey interior and a flat plate panel tended to make the Duchess feel a little average. But the high quality detail is in there as is the nice wear and tear environment, the panel's authenticity also makes it in the realism stakes, after a while you just get used to it and in time don't find anything really wanting, even later very inviting. Features are the usual JustFlight panel of pop-ups and mixed X-Plane default panels: Autopilot, Door actions, Sounds, Quick Start, Flight Computer Panel, Refill Panel and that excellent Weights and Balance panel... Avionics list is good with Bendix/King KMA 28 TSO, KT 76A transponder, KX 155 COM/NAV 2 radio and Bendix/King KR87 ADF and an excellent Century IV autopilot. Static elements on an aircraft of this price however is a bit wanting? (compare to the AirfoilLab's B350!) and with not only no separate chocks, no engine inlet covers, tags and even something clever like window covers would be nice but really expected at this price range... more creativity is required here. A few missed items in the launch list will be corrected quickly in an update, but no working interior light on release is also a bit rich? But the core of the Duchess 76 is really, really good... on the surface it is a simple aircraft, simple to use and simply to fly, but that is also it's strength in that it is an excellent learner/trainee pilot aircraft, you can see why the flight schools fight to get these Duchess aircraft on to their flightlines to train up pilot's to their multi-engine rating. And this X-Plane version is that same environment in that any new pilot wanting to find their wings in a multi-engine rating environment, then I don't think there is a better aircraft out there to do that this well, and a note to those helpful nice counter-rotating props. The pros won't be disappointed either as the Duchess has all the tools and functionality is in here as well, so the Duchess comes out in the end as a really great all rounder.... Highly Recommended. _______________________________ The Beechcraft Duchess Model 76 by JustFlight and Thranda is NOW available! from the X-Plane.Org Store here : Duchess Model 76 Priced at US$41.99 Special Features MODEL Accurately modeled Duchess Model 76, built using real-world aircraft plans and comprehensive photography of the real aircraft Numerous animations including multi-animation passenger doors that, when open, respond to G-forces and air resistance, baggage door, cockpit window and sun visors Ground equipment including chocks and tie-downs HD textures are used to produce the highest possible texture clarity PBR (Physically Based Rendering) materials with real-time environment reflections for superb quality and realism Detailed normal mapping for down-to-the-rivet precision of aircraft features COCKPIT A truly 3D virtual cockpit right down to accurately modelled seat belts and screw heads - every instrument is constructed fully in 3D with smooth animations Cockpit textures feature wear and tear based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Interactive engine start checklist that responds to user inputs and sim variables Interactive checklists for every stage of flight Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'ready for take-off' (if aircraft is stationary on the ground) Fully functional and comprehensive IFR capable avionics fit including: KMA 28 audio selector Fully featured X-Plane-native GNS430 (supports procedures out of the box, and supports Navigraph and Aerosoft custom NAV databases) KX 155 COM/NAV 2 radio KR 87 ADF receiver KT 76A transponder unit WX-8 Stormscope Century IV autopilot HSI and ADF gauges Support for Reality GTN750 (sold separately, Windows only) Interactive logbook panel for logging your flight details (X-Plane native) Flight computer panel with useful information such as fuel burn, endurance, speed and wind speed/direction GoodWay compatible Ability to change barometric units from inHg to MB in altimeter adjustment Option to activate flashlight from within pop-up window, to aid in those pitch-black cold and dark starts at night Pop-up autopilot window Option to remove window and instrument reflection effects Animated toe brakes Radio knob animations routed through plugin logic, for optimum movement fidelity and sound synchronisation AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS Custom-coded fuel system with cross-feed Custom-coded electrical system with functional circuit breakers and avionics power circuit. Circuit breaker logic is linked to X-Plane's internal failure logic, so if the plane is set to fail a certain electrical component after a certain number of hours, the circuit breaker for that element will pop out. Realistic landing gear with emergency extension, slow/fast tire rotation animation (blurry when rotating fast), precise shock absorber animation and wheel chocks and tie-downs Functioning carburetor, cowl flap and primer controls Requirements X-Plane 11 Windows, Mac or Linux 4Gb VRAM Minimum - 8Gb+ VRAM Recommended Download size: 1.3Gb Current and Review version : 1.1 (April 4th 2019) Installation and documents: Download for the Beechcraft Duchess Model 76 is 1.3 Gb and the unzipped file deposited in the aircraft "General Aviation" X-Plane folder at 1.70 GB.  Documentation: There are two manuals provided. The ODM is full of performance graphs and data and the X-Plane Manual is a full detailed manual of the aircraft's systems and layouts, a good if basic tutorial is also included Duchess Model 76 X-Plane manual.pdf Duchess Model 76 ODM X-Plane manual.pdf ChangeLog.rtf A paintkit is also included Duchess Paint Kit ______________________________________________________________________  Aircraft review by Stephen Dutton 26th April 2019 Copyright©2019 : X-Plane Reviews (Disclaimer. All images and text in this preview are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions)  Review System Specifications: Computer System: Windows - Intel Core i7 6700K CPU 4.00GHz / 64bit - 16 Gb single 1067 Mhz DDR4 2133 - ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 8Gb - Samsung Evo 512gb SSD Software: - Windows 10 - X-Plane 11.33 (v11.30 is required for this aircraft) Addons: Saitek x56 Rhino Pro system Joystick and Throttle : Sound - Bose Soundlink Mini Plugins: Environment Engine by xEnviro US$69.90 : WorldTraffic 3.0 Plugin - US$29.95 Scenery or Aircraft - KRSW - Southwest Florida International Airport by Aerosoft (X-Plane.OrgStore) - US$24.95 - KDAB - Daytona Beach by Aerosoft / Stairport Sceneries (X-Plane.OrgStore) - US$28.99 
  10. News! - Announcement : Duchess Model 76 by Just Flight - Thranda Just Flight/Thranda have announced their next release as the Twin-Engined Duchess Model 76. This is the first twin released for X-Plane by Just Flight. The aircraft is replicated from two real-life Duchess aircraft, G-BZRT and G-GCCL, and every past released of Just Flight aircrat have been very highly featured and detailed... that is reflected in the price as well, but at least they deliver for the money and there is not one Just Flight aircraft that has been released yet for X-Plane that has disappointed me or has been undervalued. Full details and features are: Accurately modelled Duchess Model 76, built using real-world aircraft plans and comprehensive photography of the real aircraft Numerous animations including multi-animation passenger doors that, when open, respond to G-forces and air resistance, baggage door, cockpit window and sun visors Ground equipment including chocks and tie-downs HD textures are used to produce the highest possible texture clarity PBR (Physically Based Rendering) materials with real-time environment reflections for superb quality and realism Detailed normal mapping for down-to-the-rivet precision of aircraft features COCKPIT A truly 3D virtual cockpit right down to accurately modelled seat belts and screw heads - every instrument is constructed fully in 3D with smooth animations Cockpit textures feature wear and tear based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Interactive engine start checklist that responds to user inputs and sim variables Interactive checklists for every stage of flight Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'ready for take-off' (if aircraft is stationary on the ground) Fully functional and comprehensive IFR capable avionics fit including: - KMA 28 audio selector - Fully featured X-Plane-native GNS430 (supports procedures out of the box, and supports Navigraph and Aerosoft custom NAV databases) - KX 155 COM/NAV 2 radio - KR 87 ADF receiver - KT 76A transponder unit - WX-8 Stormscope - Century IV autopilot - HSI and ADF gauges - Support for Reality GTN750 (sold separately, Windows only) Interactive logbook panel for logging your flight details (X-Plane native) Flight computer panel with useful information such as fuel burn, endurance, speed and wind speed/direction GoodWay compatible Ability to change barometric units from inHg to MB in altimeter adjustment Option to activate flashlight from within pop-up window, to aid in those pitch-black cold and dark starts at night Pop-up autopilot window Option to remove window and instrument reflection effects Animated toe brakes Radio knob animations routed through plugin logic, for optimum movement fidelity and sound synchronisation AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS Custom-coded fuel system with crossfeed Custom-coded electrical system with functional circuit breakers and avionics power circuit. Circuit breaker logic is linked to X-Plane's internal failure logic, so if the plane is set to fail a certain electrical component after a certain number of hours, the circuit breaker for that element will pop out. Realistic landing gear with emergency extension, slow/fast tyre rotation animation (blurry when rotating fast), precise shock absorber animation and wheel chocks and tie-downs Functioning carburettor, cowl flap and primer controls Dedicated interactive engine pop-up window displaying values such as fuel tank weights and imbalance, fuel pressure, oil pressure, oil temperature, battery charge (with quick charge option), and information about spark plug fouling and vapour lock condition Simulated vapour lock condition, with warning pop-up and suggested actions Simulated spark plug fouling condition, with indication of percentage of fouling Lighting system includes separate lighting control for gauges (via rheostat) Functional electric trim control on yoke Simulated fan and vent system with realistic blower sounds (linked to circuit breaker logic and electrical system for realism) Custom external light logic with custom strobe light pattern and custom light halos for added realism LIVERIES The Duchess comes with eleven paint schemes: G-BZRT (UK) G-GCCL (UK) G-BNYO (UK) G-WACJ (UK) N671R (USA) D-GIGY (Germany) F-GCLJ (France) C-GTYG (Canada) VH-HKI (Australia) EC-INC (Spain) ZK-JED (New Zealand) OTHER FEATURES Realistic and accurate flight dynamics based on real-world performance and handling data, and input from Duchess pilots Authentic sound set, generated using X-Plane's state-of-the-art FMOD sound system Custom sounds for switches, doors, warnings and more, featuring accurate location placement of sounds in the stereo spectrum, 3D audio effects, atmospheric effects, adaptive Doppler, exterior sounds spill in when window or door(s) are opened, different sound characteristics depending on viewing angle etc. Comprehensive manual with panel guide and performance data PSD Paint Kit included so you can create your own paint schemes Dedicated pop-up window for sound mixing, allowing for individual adjustment of the volume of exterior sounds, in-cockpit sounds and various effects Custom weight and balance manager window Most past release announcements from Just Flight means the release is imminent, maybe later this week or even next week as at the moment it is noted as "In development" price is also not noted, but most Just Flight aircraft are usually in the low to mid-forties in US dollar terms... JustFlight are here: JustFlight Should be also on the X-Plane.OrgStore very soon after the official release... Images and text are courtesy of Just Flight ________________________________________ News by Stephen Dutton 4th March 2019 Copyright©2019: X-Plane Reviews
  11. News! - Aircraft Updates : JustFlight updates ALL aircraft to 11.30 JustFlight/Thranda have updated ALL of their aircraft to X-Plane 11.30 specifications... All changes include: Common to all aircraft Support for rain effects (requires free 3rd party "librain" plugin) Improved VR (VR Pop-up support, cleaned up yoke, more supported knobs, etc.) Improved sounds and sound effects Upgraded to SASL 3.5.1, which now includes pop-out window support Revamped RealityXP configuration to bring it to the latest capabilities of the GTN750 Revamped flight dynamics for XP11.30 Broke out checklist to "manifest.json" file, so it's end-user editable now. Moved cockpit.obj file into "objects" folder, for neater top directory. Numerous optimisations and improvements. TB10/TB20 v1.1 New graphics, improved PBR materials, fixed textures. Added VR magnet attach point for XPad Added VR click spot for Just Flight pop-up menu Hawk T1 v1.2 Smoke effects (red, white, blue smoke with smoke pod attachment). Added VR click spot for Just Flight pop-up menu Fixed some texture artefacts Improved rotational inertia around the roll axis Integrated XP11.30's oxygen system Fixed some VR knobs Improved throttle latch logic C152 v1.1 Added VR magnet attach point for XPad Added VR click spot for Just Flight pop-up menu Added RealityXP support (GTN750 now integrated in 3D panel) Closed up compass Improved ground handling Added paint kit Fixed quick-look views Arrow III v1.6, Turbo Arrow III/IV v1.6, Warrior II v1.6 and Archer III v1.1 Added VR magnet attach point for XPad Made spark plug fouling rate and Vapour lock configurable via manifest.json file. Hide Yoke system now responds to X-Plane's default command Optimised performance. Fixed case sensitivity issue for Linux Removed default wing condensation effects. (They're excessive by default). Note the new feature for the Librain (rain effects) plugin on all the aircraft.... see here: librain (rain) library for windshield effects If you have a Just Flight account, then go and click on 'Your Orders', you will be able to re-download the installer(s) for the aircraft you have purchased to get the latest updated version(s). X-Plane.OrgStore updates are available ________________________________________ (Disclaimer. All images and text in this review are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions) News by Stephen Dutton 14th February 2019 ♥️ Copyright©2019: X-Plane Reviews
  12. Aircraft Review : PA-28-181 Archer III by JustFlight and Thranda Over the 2018/19 holiday break I flew both the earlier JustFlight/Thranda aircraft in the Arrow lll and the lV Turbo. This was to see how the aircraft still lived up to their reputation of the best of the rest. Overall they did, but a few things also came to pass. First and foremost, the aircraft are slow, the Turbo was a little better at around 165 knts, but an average ground speed in the Arrow lll of 125 knts is a twiddle or play with your fingers time... even after two hours flying I had barely moved across the map, and yes that average cruise speed is correct. As a realistic simulation with immersion then the Arrow lll was very good, but if you like faster aircraft then you will find this new release of the Archer lll by JustFlight/Thranda down in the low cruise speed zone... it is certainly not boring, but you don't cover the ground very fast either. Secondly do we really need another PA28 aircraft? many on the threads moaned that enough was getting enough... but the trick is that not all PA28 aircraft are created equally, as there is always a variation somewhere in the PA28's very long but illustrious career. We have already had the Cherokee, Arrow, Warrior and the only missing PA28 was the Archer. It was released by Piper after the Cherokee and the Arrow variants as the Archer variant had again another five inch fuselage extension, wing span increase, larger horizontal tail and a small gross weight increase over the Arrow. This release is the Archer lll from 1994, so that makes the aircraft a sort of a more modern variant, than say a 60's or 70's Cherokee, and so that gives the aircraft a more later open lighter feel. The Archer's distinctive smaller round engine inlets also help in the streamline effect of projecting a more contemporary look, that of say a more composite aircraft would than it would an early 70's aircraft design. The Archer lll does look and feel a size slightly larger than the Arrow (because it actually is), so overall it doesn't feel as connected to the PA28 family as the other family members. By now after a few releases with Just Flight you expect the high quality of the design that is reflected in the price, and you are not disappointed here either. Modeling and detail is really good to excellent, with some really nice weathering to make it all look extremely realistic as well. It is very easy now to take this sort of HD quality now for granted, but it is still important to realise how far we have come in X-Plane in a very short time with this high level of ultra realism. Although complex in the convex and concave curves and it is also surprising the modeling is so outstandingly good, note the lovely air vents and NACA air-ducts. The corrugated ribs in the tail are beautifully done and the required antennas and RF aerials are excellent, note the nice vent in the upper leading edge of the tail. Build and registration plate is a nice touch, as is the tie down hook. Glass is now again expected to be now first rate, and here it is in that high quality class in shape and reflections, and also comes with a look of a mottled feel in the glass. Two doors open with the passenger door and a locker baggage door like on all PA28's behind the rear seats. Passenger door internally opens via two locks and then a slide along the door trim... The PA28 cabins are tight, more so in the rear. The cabin colour scheme is a bit to your own taste, with a salmon lower trim and motif upper design, there is here only one interior design. Seats are nice and leather crumpled, with sheepskin covers on the two front seats which is really well done. Note the huge clipboard on the pilot's yoke... it is very large and a sort of in your face (or belly), I am not sure if I like that? Instrument panel feels more Cessna in design with the lighter plain facia than the usual with a Piper, with the either usually covered or molded 70's panel trim on the earlier aircraft that is not used here. Electrical rocker switches are overhead. The trim wheel is low and tight between the seats with the three stage flap handle, all very familiar PA28. Nice rudder pedals are well done with the fuel tank switch on the left sidewall... always check if the tank switch is on before starting as the default position is OFF. Instrument Panel Overall the instrument layout in the Archer is quite basic, but it is an interesting layout as well with some unique details. The Standard Six (SS) flying instruments are quite small by design... Airspeed Indicator, Artificial Horizon and the Attitude Indicator are on the top row and the Turn Coordinator, Heading Dial/Course and Vertical Speed Indicators set out directly below. Left of the SS is a clock, Gyro Suction and ADF pointer... note the interesting compass slaving switches far left lower... Right of the SS is the GNS-255 driven OBS VOR2/ILS dial, with a Stormscope set below. Lower panel are four engine readout dials that cover Oil Temp, Fuel Press, Oil Press - EGT (Exhaust gas temperature) - Left Fuel tank (24 Gal) and Right Fuel tank (24 Gal) - Tachometer. Top panel has a very nice set of (testable) Annunciator panel lights There are no instruments on the right panel side except for a standby Attitude Indicator. Avionics stack is the usual Bendix/King KMA 24 TSO radio which is above the S-Tec 55 Autopilot with the GNS530 below (the Reality XP's GTN 750 unit can also be fitted, but this is an addon extra and costs you another $49.95.) Note the power switch for the S-Tec 55 is below right and hard to find... until the green light comes on to show it is powered up. Top of the stack is an active intercom switch and a Monroy Traffic-Watch ATD-300, this is a useful tool that displays traffic on a Garmin 430/530, personally I don't know if it works in X-Plane or with the Reality GTN 750. Second stack has top an interesting transponder in the Trig's TT31, that most pilots retro-fit over the Bendix/King KT76A and KT78A transponders. It is really nice to use and set. The COM2/VOR2 unit is a different unit as well with the Garmin GNC 255 which is a current modern avionics set. A Bendix/King KN 64 DME unit (ground speed and distance) and a Bendix/King KR 87 is the ADF unit.Upper right is an usual digital ammeter. Lower panel has the main Throttle lever, Mixture lever and a hidden Friction control. There is a full set of circuit breakers which are noted to be active.. but I couldn't get them to work? which is real surprise as they did on the Arrow lll/lV. The outside temperature gauge is up on the lower side window frame left. Menu The menu is set on the left side tab (mouse scroll to hide!) and this brings up the now familiar JustFlight menu. There are seventeen menu tiles to use including: Top row : Open/close cabin door - Open/close baggage door - Toggle GNS 530 GPS pop-up window (or the GTN750 payware add-on by RealityXP) - Toggle window reflections and interior glass dynamic reflections - Toggle dome light if the engine is running, or flashlight when starting cold and dark. Middle Row : Toggle autopilot pop-up window - Toggle Wheel Fairings - Toggle automatic fuel selector (switches fuel tanks automatically) - Toggle fuel refill menu window - Open weight and balance window - Toggle volumes window  Bottom row : Select ‘ready for takeoff’ or ‘cold and dark’ state - Toggle checklist pop-up window - Toggle flight computer pop-up window - Toggle logbook pop-up window - Toggle ground handling pop-up window - Toggle chocks and tie-downs. The arrows at the very bottom of the menu panel allows you to select the livery you require and far more quickly than the X-Plane menu. Oddly missing is the usual altimeter barometric pressure scale between InHg and mb? The weight and balance window is very good, with weights for all four passengers, and baggage, fuel can be set here also as can the change from kg - lbs. A full list of weights, CG and a large graph of your settings are all very helpful into balancing the aircraft. Chocks, tie-downs and a ground pull handle are visible when activated. Switching the wheel fairings ON/OFF gives you a more exposed gear that I tend to favour. The animated pilot disappears as well, and yes he is realistic, but certainly not in the way of the better Carenado style human realism. Flying the Archer lll There is a fuel "Prime" button that is required, but don't over use it, a few seconds is fine, and then hit the starter (you did set the fuel tanks position?) And then the Lycoming IO-360-C1C6 engine of 200 hp (149 kW) should easily fire into life. The missing barometric pressure scale between InHg and mb are both shown directly in the Attitude Indicator, but either can be very hard to set unless you get very close... the standby attitude indicator on the far right has to set independently as well. Brake off, and they is a nice feel of weight (1054.7 Kg) that you feel under the throttle, and it needs a fair push to build some forward momentum. You also feel the difference of the mixture setting from lean to heavy, so you keep the mixture lever around the 3/4 mark. This aircraft feels that is now under the new X-Plane11.30 rules in better engine refinement, you just feel those new differences more now, and yes you do. The sounds reflect those minute throttle changes as well, but this more a gentle refined aircraft, than the earlier noisy shaking if over realistic forbears. Taxi speed is easily kept to, but pull the throttle back too far and the speed will run off and you quickly slow, so it is a bit of a trick to keep it all moving at a nice pace. Full mixture and throttle up... don't push the throttle right up quickly to the forward position but feed the fuel in nicely, then slowly the aircraft will start to move and then build up speed, again the required propeller thrust is felt before any movement, that is not sluggish in feel, but in realism. Flap is set at the first notch, and the aircraft tracks very nicely. Around 80 knts you can pitch up and fly, but once you feel the airflow over the wings lifting well, then quickly retract those flaps to gain more speed. Climb rate officially is 667 fpm but you can be liberal with that, I found even 700 ft fpm easily achieved, but you won't do that would you... stay at 550 fpm for the best results of a climbing speed and the nice gain of height at the same time. First thoughts on handling are "Predictable", "Solid"... even "Undemanding" but also engrossing. It is a nice aircraft to bank, climb and fly. Your certainly not going to throw it around, so your movements are very precise and slow to the actions you want to convey. One of the things I really didn't like on all the Just Flight Arrows was the manual trim... The Arrow lll was a monster to trim, and I tried everything to make the aircraft balance itself, even then it also had a nasty tendency to porpoise to any wind movements, and that made the vertical speed to always pitching badly between the positive and negative movements and sometimes for as much as 300 ft either way, and that took a lot of pleasure out of the flying. it also would have the odd effect of the aircraft having a hiccup every now and again. And the nasty trim wheel location with no panel indicator just sent you mental in trying to trim it out anyway in the first place. I tried knob adjustments (worse) and key adjustments (better but still too big a trim step). So to a point I was fearing the Archer lll would have the same behavior? but it is not... There are some interesting differences between the Arrow and the Archer. One is X-Plane 11.30. I think the better dynamics of 11.30 have calmed the aircraft down, and two there is now a better trim adjustment for your key input in "Pitch trim down-Mechanical, not servo". The adjustments feel smaller so you can now get more finer trim control, there is a very nice "Electric Trim" on the Yoke (left handle), but you really need that very fine trim adjustment that only the keys can give you. But the aircraft (thankfully) can now be trimmed out. The only note is that the Archer still has the tendency with the thrust to tilt to the left, so there is the requirement to just slightly keep a light force on the yoke to the right to keep it in a straight flightpath. Note to trim the aircraft with the yoke force applied, as if not it will be set wrong. It will be interesting to test fly the Arrows when they have been updated also to 11.30 to see if the trim issue has been reduced to be more realistic like this Archer. The now 11.30 default S-Tec 55 Autopilot is a nice bit of kit... (remember the hidden switch!) but like for all the avionics the autopilot pops-out for use. Here it is in the new X-Plane panel window system (for VR and home panels) that can be adjusted from very small to incredibly large. But you do have to adjust the background to fit the unit. Speeds are noted as 75% power, best power mixture, 8,000 ft 128 KTAS/3.8 hr (63 pph/10.5 gph) and 65% power, best economy mixture, 12,000 ft with both at 125 KTAS/4.5 hr (54 pph/9 gph) with a service ceiling of 13,236 ft and a range of 522 NM (Max Payload), So you don't cover the distance very fast, but the Archer does feel actually faster than the Arrow lll? Throttle adjustment is required to get the best downward vertical speed as well as setting -3 on the S-Tec, the thick white band on the airspeed is your performance band, and the upper yellow is the caution zone... the flap zone beneath 100knts is the smaller white band, but it is very hard to read. Time to head back in.... The one thing I really loved about the JustFlight Arrows was the low speed balance and manoeuvrability, it was a fun factor to fly, again and again. Dancing between 70 knts and 65 knts to control the height, more throttle to slow the descent and less to drop a little more was highlighted by an 8 knt crosswind. I was on the centreline and then I wasn't, so it was a balance between the right rudder and right or left yoke movements to correct the line. I eased the Archer into the correct position and then slowly reduced the throttle and at around 60 knts to sweet touch the runway... "ahhh... " nice that. So the low speed handling is again brilliant but also challenging to your skills, also it is highly rewarding, and I have done three landings now and each one was perfect, even in these blustery conditions. So the aircraft is great for both in the fact if you are a bit of a novice it is a great platform to learn on with excellent feedback, but also challenging enough for the pros to show off their skills. Lighting The instrument panel lighting is simply gorgeous... instruments have in-direct lighting, but the various avionic systems colours fill out the rest, again the lighting looks more Cessna than Piper. Two adjustable blue roof lights give off an off-world glow that is highlighted by the lovely rocker switch-gear lighting.... There are two overhead rear lights that brightens up the rear seats, these are activated by the switches on the side wall by each seat. All in all it a lovely place to cruise at night, but functional as well for serious night flying. The external lighting is a bit sparse... ... there is a landing light set at each wing tip, but otherwise the rest of the lighting is all set together in the wing-tip assembly. There are the navigation lights, the end strobe lights (bright) and in a different layout the white rear pointing navigation lights are also here in the same assembly.. there are no beacons or other external lights, so the aircraft can be silhouetted quite dark at night. A tip if you like your replays, then leave the strobes off while flying. Liveries There are ten liveries, all 4K HD high detailed quality. The choice is nicely varied and mostly focused on Europe, but a few are very similar in the variation of the same burgundy colour scheme. There is also the standard blank/white. Included are: C-GUXL (Canada), D-EFVC (Germany), EC-JQO (Spain), F-GNCH (France), G-CCHI (UK), G-CIFY (UK), HB-PPN (Switzerland), N6092U (USA), PH-AED (Netherlands) and VH-PPR (Australia). Summary This is the fourth variation of the PA28 aircraft from JustFlight/Thranda, the others being the Arrow lll, Turbo Arrow lll and the Turbo Arrow lV. The differences of this Archer lll besides the variant changes is that this is a more modern in 90's design and feel than the others in their late 70's disguises. The differences are down just not to the actual different panel and interior design, but also to the avionics packages that are quite different and unique to X-Plane with a Monroy Traffic-Watch ATD-300, GNC 255 and the Trig's TT31 transponder as the highlights... So this is a PA28 with a difference. In this mid-forties price range you expect a lot, and JustFlight are very good of delivering the quality and features that you expect. The aircraft is also up to date with the current specifications in X-Plane 11.30, and yes you notice the differences between the adjusted and the non-adjusted aircraft, and that is a significant bonus here as the Archer flies far much better than most PA28's and loses a lot of the irksome characteristics that is noticeable on the other JF PA28s and mostly in the trim area. Modeling is as noted very good, but the Salmon interior design is to your own taste, and it is certainly not like the very dramatic reds of the Arrow lll, but the more you fly the Archer then the more you love it as it sorts of through it's realism and flying characteristics in that you realise that this is certainly the very best PA28 yet. Features are very good and plentiful as is the lighting is excellent with the interior that is simply beautiful as are all the sounds which are all top quality FMOD and 180º dynamic. So the package is very strong. You don't purchase these aircraft to just put another aircraft into your hangar. In most cases it is for a personal reason, in that you have flown or owned one or want the very best dynamics of a certain aircraft. So it has to deliver on many levels as this is a serious investment. I personally think it does, but the real verdict will really be only out there with the owners that can relate to the aircraft on their own personal level.... Highly Recommended _______________________________ The PA-28-181 Archer III by JustFlight and Thranda is NOW available! from the X-Plane.Org Store here : PA-28-181 Archer III Priced at US$41.99 Special Features Cockpit A truly 3D virtual cockpit right down to accurately modeled seat belts and screw heads - every instrument is constructed fully in 3D with smooth animations Cockpit textures feature wear and tear based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Interactive engine start checklist that responds to user inputs and sim variables Interactive checklists for every stage of flight Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'ready for take-off' (if aircraft is stationary on the ground) Fully functional and comprehensive IFR capable avionics fit including: KMA 24 audio selector Fully featured X-Plane-native GNS530 (supports procedures out of the box, and supports Navigraph and Aerosoft custom nav databases) GNC 255 COM/NAV 2 radio KN 62 DME unit which can display information from NAV 1 or NAV 2 S-TEC autopilot with lateral hold modes (HDG, NAV, APR, REV) and vertical modes (ALT, VS) TT31 transponder KR 87 ADF Traffic-Watch ATD-300 traffic awareness unit Strikefinder stormscope HSI and ADF gauges Support for RealityXP GTN750 (sold separately, Windows only) Interactive logbook panel for logging your flight details (X-Plane native) Flight computer panel with useful information such as fuel burn, endurance, speed and wind speed/direction GoodWay compatible Ability to change barometric units from InHg to MB in altimeter adjustment Option to activate flashlight from within pop-up window, to aid in those pitch-black cold and dark starts at night Pop-up autopilot window Option to remove window and instrument reflection effects Animated toe brakes Functional throttle quadrant tensioning system Radio knob animations routed through plugin logic, for optimum movement fidelity and sound synchronisation Aircraft systems Custom-coded fuel system, including the option of automatic fuel tank switching for use on those long distance cross-country flights (this option is remembered for future flights) Custom-coded electrical system with functional circuit breakers, avionics power circuit and emergency bus controls. Circuit breaker logic is linked to X-Plane's internal failure logic, so if the plane is set to fail a certain electrical component after a certain number of hours, the circuit breaker for that element will pop out. Realistic landing gear with slow/fast tire rotation animation (blurry when rotating fast), precise shock absorber animation and wheel chocks and tie-downs Functioning carburetor and primer controls Dedicated interactive engine pop-up window displaying values such as fuel tank weights and imbalance, fuel pressure, oil pressure, oil temperature, battery charge (with quick charge option), and information about spark plug fouling and vapor lock condition Simulated vapor lock condition, with warning pop-up and suggested actions Simulated spark plug fouling condition, with indication of percentage of fouling Lighting system includes separate lighting control for gauges (via rheostat) Functional electric trim control on yoke Simulated fan and vent system with realistic blower sounds (linked to circuit breaker logic and electrical system for realism) Custom external light logic with custom strobe light pattern and custom light halos for added realism Requirements X-Plane 11+ Windows, Mac or Linux 4GB+ VRAM (GeForce GTX 1070 or better or similar from AMD) Windows 10 / 7 / Vista / XP, MAC OS 10.10 (or higher) or Linux Current and Review version and : 1.0 (January 30th 2019) PS: Owners of any the PA28 by JustFlight can purchase this new Archer lII with a $7 discount ( $34.99). Find your coupon code under your Arrow invoice at the store (doesn't apply to Arrows from other designers) Installation and documents: Download for the PA-28-181 Archer III is 730Mb and the unzipped file deposited in the aircraft "General Aviation" X-Plane folder at 818.60mb. Documentation: There are two manuals provided. The ODM is full of performance graphs and data and the X-Plane Manual is a full detailed manual of the aircraft's systems and layouts, a good if basic tutorial is also included PA-28-181 Archer III ODM manual X-Plane.pdf PA-28-181 Archer III X-Plane manual.pdf ______________________________________________________________________ Aircraft review by Stephen Dutton 9th February 2019 Copyright©2019 : X-Plane Reviews (Disclaimer. All images and text in this preview are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions) Review System Specifications: Computer System: Windows - Intel Core i7 6700K CPU 4.00GHz / 64bit - 16 Gb single 1067 Mhz DDR4 2133 - ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 8Gb - Samsung Evo 512gb SSD Software: - Windows 10 - X-Plane 11.31 (v11.30 is required for this aircraft) Addons: Saitek x56 Rhino Pro system Joystick and Throttle : Sound - Bose Soundlink Mini Plugins: Environment Engine by xEnviro US$69.90 : WorldTraffic 3.0 Plugin - US$29.95 Scenery or Aircraft - LMML- Malta International Airport by JustSim (X-Plane.OrgStore) - US$22.30
  13. Aircraft Review : BAe Systems Hawk T1/A Trainer by JustFlight - Thranda Design The Folland Gnat T.1 was the mainstay of RAF jet training onwards from 1959. The aircraft was a nimble and extremely good training aircraft for pilots moving into military jet aircraft and then moving on upwards to the heavier Hawker Hunters and English Electric Lightings. But in the early 70's the RAF realised that the next generation of jet fighters would require a more advanced trainer and a two-seater to accommodate the Sepecat Jaguar and the Panavia Tornado. The result was the Hawker Siddeley Hawk T1 (Trainer Mk1). In reality the relationship of the Hawk to it's predecessor the Gnat is actually very close and highly related. Hawker Siddeley had bought out Folland in 1959, as British Aerospace Systems (BAe) would also merge with Hawker Siddeley in 1977, however the Hawk was built and still assembled in Hamble at the old Folland factory where the Gnat had also been produced. The Hawk also followed the Gnat in being the mainstay of the RAF British Aerobatic Team, known as the "Red Arrows" and still holds that coveted position today. JustFlight - Thranda Design It is just under a year in that the partnership of JustFlight and Thranda Design released their first aircraft for X-Plane11, that was the PA28R Piper Arrow III and since then there has also been the PA28R Turbo Piper Arrow III/IV in February and the TB10 Tobago & TB20 Trinidad in May and finally the excellent Cessna 152 ll in June. All aircraft I thought brought far more to X-Plane in features and to the general aviation category, but more so in the highly realistic handing of the aircraft. They are not cheap aircraft and all sit on the top of the scale in price for general aviation aircraft, but they also do deliver in another level in quality as well. This is JustFlight's and Thranda's next release with the BAe Systems Hawk T1. First it is a radical change from the usual general aviation style of aircraft and it also took a long time to get released? The aircraft was initially first announced back in February earlier this year, then another promotion in the middle of the year sent our heart's a flutter again but then it all went very quiet, this time it is actually here... so was it worth the wait? That is what reviews are for, so let us see. BAe Systems Hawk T1/A Trainer We have come to now expect a very high quality aircraft from JustFlight/Thranda, as it should be in this price range as that is what you are paying for, in high very high quality and for loads of features. There is no doubt the Hawk stands out there in the quality stakes, the level here is extremely high, if the best fighter/trainer now in in X-Plane11. To be fair there is not a lot of competition to compare the Hawk with as very few modern fighters have yet made the transition from X-Plane10, coming and in the same category is X-Trident's Harrier AV8B, so that aircraft will be a better benchmark. Would this aircraft pass the Airshow walkaround test? you know the one where you walkaround the aircraft noting it's details and equipment points, take a few pictures to remind you of the aircraft... in this case yes. The quality of the detailing is phenomenal, and I am set at a lower resolution setting. Another level of detail again for X-Plane? If not then it is close... aircraft modelling is absolutely first rate, perfection, not a 3d bump out of place. In realism you have glass and reflections that really deliver (note the explosive cord for seat ejection on the canopy glass)... again are you looking into a real jet at an airshow? if not then you are pretty well close to it. It is the smaller details that create a believable realism, note the slightly worn landing light nose glass and wingtip lighting enclosures, the tail leading edge material and the correct accurate layout of rivets and paneling. As a note, the Hawk uses the Rolls-Royce/Turbomeca "Adour 151" non-afterburning turbofan with 2,360 kilograms (5,200 pounds) thrust. It is a more expensive engine, but also more economical to use; like the Specate Jaguar it also uses the "102" version of the Adour in a twin-engine installation. The engine drops down out of the Hawk's belly just behind the wings for service, and in principle can be replaced in one and a half hours. The Hawk is built with ease of serviceability in mind, and almost a third of the aircraft's surface is covered by access panels. There is a "Microturbo 047 Mark 2 Gas Turbine Starter/Auxiliary Power Unit (GTS/APU)" that is installed above the engine to permit self-starting, and to assist in relights after an in-flight flameout. If the aircraft loses power in flight, a ram-air turbine can also automatically pop up in front of the vertical tailplane to provide emergency electrical power and the RAM is featured here and works realistically on the aircraft. The Hawk has two main and one forward strut trailing link undercarriage assemblies... .... detailing is the very best as you would expect in this class, but even more so. Every joint, component, hydraulic line, hydraulic piston, nut and bolt is here, even the strut labels and markings are also correctly applied. Animations in ground movement and retraction/extraction are perfect, even more so as the trailing link assembly can give the taxiing of the aircraft a feel that is quite different from normal, but perfectly authentic. Back to the airshow... usually you stand in line, and usually for a long wait. But your turn does come and you have a fleeting few moments... ... you can look of course but can't touch! but what would you give to sit in there? "sit in the real jet"... The aim of the ultimate in simulation is break down that barrier, and to be able to not only sit in the aircraft but to actually flying this expensive complex machine as well, to live the dream. But for to that to work in simulation then the detail must above and beyond, you thought what was excellent even a few years ago, but here with this Hawk you see the level go higher again, and in a few years it will go even higher... but for now this is the best of the best current standard. First glance inside the Hawk cockpit is the usual overwhelming complexity. But usually as you decipher and break the detail up and work it all out it all comes to make sense... Panels are grouped as: Left console – throttle, engine starting, electrical and flying control systems Left main panel – weapon selection and radio Centre main panel – flight instruments and weapon sighting Right main panel – engine instruments Right console – avionics equipment You can't expect every switch or button and knob to work in the cockpit, but I would guess the number is still very high in here at around 90%. In the rear seat that percentage is around 70%, not bad, but you still miss a few things you would like to control. Cockpit detail is to the extreme. Many fighter cockpit have been exceptional in detail, but don't convey that realism factor, but that is not the case here, it is about as real as it gets, every seat belt, material stitching, pipe, metal panel, screw, nut and bolt is visible and all have highly realistic textures... ... the highlight is the instrument panel glareshields, they have that dusty, not touched since installed look about them, you just want to move your fingers in the dust to create a mark, perfection. Menu/Features The menu is fully featured and positioned via the usual JustFlight left screen side arrow, scrolling on the arrow will make it transparent. This menu layout is far better than the earlier menus, as they had just a red transparency when selected and they looked very dated. This version has coloured items for selection and looks the business. There are 21 selections and features to choose from, and not in any order we will start with the pilots. There are two animated realistic pilots that you can select via the menu, you can also select if you want their visors up or down... ... one note is that if you put the front seat pilot's visor down the screen image goes slightly darker, but the rear visor does not create the same effect? also the pilots selection is only external, so if you are seated in the front or rear seat, then the other seat internally is empty, which is a bit odd as you can select if you want this feature or not? (arrowed) Why not show the internal pilot if you so wish for realism? Overall the pilots are excellent in detail. Selections include static elements like: chocks (rear wheels), tags and pitot and engine inlet/outlet covers, and a very nice work maintenance step frame... ... another ingress option is the aircraft's built in steps, or pop out extensions that are well done (arrowed above). Options include the external diesel tank carried by display aircraft, or the M61A1-Vulcan 6,000 rounds per minute centre mounted cannon... Four armament racks allow a variety of weapons, that are selected via the X-Plane "Weapons" menu, here we have the AIM-9 Sidewinder and AIM120-AMRAAM, but bombs can be carried as well, but just watch their excessive weight are balanced! Nice detailing on the armament racks that will change to the correctly selected armament. Forward locker opens to reveal the avionic equipment racks. There are two Hawk versions to choose from in the T1 or the T1a. This is noted via the extension over the exhaust outlet... ... but in reality it is a bit useless? The difference between the T1 and T1a versions is that the T1 is the trainer, and the T1a is the armed or fighter version? so why not use the selection to denote the different types by having the armament off for the T1 and the aircraft armed for the T1a version? Menu options internally include the aiming gunsight, and two left and right flip up frequency display panels... ... they don't actually display any frequencies? but there is a fix by MatthewM that adds in the frequencies via an texture file. The same display fix is also in the Red Arrows display livery by Christophe, and here you also get with the livery the lovely Red (Arrows) flying suits as well! With the external diesel tank attached you get a double panel of a set of coloured lights on top of the glareshield (yellow arrows), but there are no notes on if they work, or why? There is a good kneeboard for checklists that pops up. It can be moved around the screen, but it is not scalable, which makes it a bit of a blocking visual distraction in the air (as you can't see anything forward!) as the menu itself is also locked to the left side of the screen and again not scalable.... joysicks front and rear can be hidden and note the "Rudder Lock" (arrowed) Final menu options include a "Cold and Dark" to ready (electrical on/off) and a full engine start up that starts the engines and configures hydraulic and electrical systems so that you are ready to taxi feature, you could call it a "Scramble mode!". There is a feature that configures the aircraft so that weapons are live (ready to fire) and you can select/change the livery from the menu. Instrument panels Power up and the Hawk comes to life. Panel lighting is excellent and adjustable for the left, right and main instrument panels. Annunciator warning panel (CWS - Central Warning System) can be tested. Main cluster of flying instruments covers clockwise... Turn-and-slip indicator, Main Artificial Horizon, Backup Artificial Horizon. Main Altimeter, Vertical speed indicator (VSI), Horizontal situation indicator (HSI) or heading indicator, Directional gyro indicator (DGI), Combined speed indicator (CSI)... top centre left is the Accelerometer. Right front panel is clockwise: Standby altimeter, Cabin Altimeter, Oxygen supply contents, Fuel gauge, TGT indicator (Turbine Gas Temperature), Engine LP shaft rotation indicator/RPM indicator. The Oxygen flow indicator will flip on and off if the oxygen is flowing correctly. lower right is the electrical switchgear and panel lighting adjustment knobs. Depending on if the Hawk is armed or not (T1a) then the firing panel is located upper left... The Lock/Live switch is upper right (magenta arrow). Pylon (rack) selection and armament selection is on the Weapon Control panel, but don't for "heaven's sake" fire it off on the ground like I did... ... as it is not pretty and I suppose that is what the "Safety" is for! The Hawk has a CCS or Communications Control System which provides overall control of the elements of the communications system. The CCS integrates the VHF transmit facilities and the audio signals from this equipment and from the ILS and TACAN receivers. It also integrates the audio tone of the tone generator in the Central Warning System. The radio below the weapons panel is the UHF radio set, but with X-Plane11 you can't access UHF, so the Hawk uses regular VHF frequencies. This radio will control the COM 1 frequencies. It is very nicely done anyway, and super easy to set and use. There are also 20 preset frequencies you can use and if you want a certain frequency, it can be set via the ‘manifest.json’ file with a text editor. Right Console Right panel has the other radio set and this unit is again a UHF unit, but set to the regular VHF (X-Plane) frequencies. This radio controls the COM 2 frequencies. Again the radio can be preset to frequencies and details on the correct insert order (‘manifest.json’) can be found in the manual. The radio panel layout and detail here really good and quite authentic (to a point with X-Plane restrictions). An ILS installation is comprised of a localiser and glideslope receiver and a marker receiver, there is no autopilot, so the ILS is a visual reference only. The Hawk is fitted with an IFF/SSR (Identification Friend or Foe/Secondary Surveillance Radar) system which provides identification facilities and IFF, and civil SSR including ‘Mode S’. The system provides facilities for an IFF or SSR ground radar station to interrogate the aircraft and for the aircraft to rapidly and automatically transmit an identifying reply. The system replies to Mode 1, 2, 3/A, 4, C and S interrogations, including civil and military emergency interrogations. The IFF/SSR control display unit (CDU) is used to control the operation of the IFF/SSR transponders. It works in this aircraft in the MODE 4 interrogations 4A and 4B and for civilian M3/A or auto selection. Note the oxygen valve (yellow arrow above right). Lower panel known as the "Leg" panel is on the upper panel is the AHRS (Attitude and Heading Reference System) control unit, and the lower is the ISIS control unit (Ferranti ISIS Century Series Gunsight). The AHRS is used to calibrate the artificial horizon or align, and if the balls (both main and standby) are lazy then you haven't done this before flying the aircraft. The Ferranti ISIS Century gunsight is adjusted via the left and right knobs (arrowed above right), but I can't see any brightness adjustment, so the sight is quite hard to see? Mode selections include: GA – for air-to-air firing, G – this mode is for air-to-ground gun attacks. With G selected, the aiming mark is then depressed to cater for the gravity drop of the shell, R – same as G, but drift control will adjust the horizontal position of the sight, B – when B is selected, the sight is initially depressed, but can still be moved with the depression control. S – same as B, but the sight is not initially depressed. M - air-to-air missile attack mode is not available. Left Console On the left the console covers the aircraft's throttle, engine starting, electrical and flying control systems. Note first the rearward and slightly hidden main fuel cock lever. Engine start and aircraft (electric) trim switches are rear panel. The lovely stubby throttle is excellent, but note the catch? (arrowed), to move the throttle and the catch needs to set in the up position, but be careful if you hit the catch in flight to click down, as then if you go back to idle the throttle will then lock, unless you release the catch again to up... not the best idea to do if you are on an approach? A set of five gauges cover: No. 1 and No. 2 hydraulic system pressure, Brakes supply pressure and Left and right brake pressures. Left lower main panel are buttons to raise and lower the undercarriage, "UP" is retraction, and "DOWN" is extraction, very different from the usual lever... a manual gear release for both the nosewheel and main gear is here as well. More unusual is a switch (arrowed above right) to lower the flaps between: Up - Mid - Down. and confusing is the flap setting of 0 -5 x10 (degrees). The battery "Volts" gauge is on this side panel as well. Rear position has a few items removed... ... with the ISIS Gunsight panel which is missing and AHRS is disconnected, and the left upper armament panel (T1a) shows the weapon activity, but there is no access to the switchgear.... side consoles lose the IFF/SSR panel right and the engine startup panel left. Overall I think the aircraft finds the right balance on providing a realistic immersion in the cockpit, without that overkill of the minute of details. Flying the BAe Hawk T1a Back to the airshow... you know when the air display is going to start, and everyone runs to the fence by the runway. Usually I go the other way and run to the parc fermé, as there is nothing, I mean nothing like a jet aircraft or helicopter starting up it's engine(s). (hint turn up your sound volume a little) Starting up the Hawk is actually quite easy. The T1 has a Microturbo 047 Mark 2 Gas Turbine Starter/Auxiliary Power Unit (GTS/APU) installed above the engine to permit ground self-starting and to assist in relights after an in-flight flameout. So there is no ground power cart (GPU). The system is comprised of a gas turbine air producer and a free turbine starter motor. The air producer (GTS) is at the top of the fuselage, forward of the ram air turbine. It supplies air via a solenoid-operated start valve, and when the dump valve is closed it supplies air to the starter motor which is fitted to the engine external gearbox and drives the HP shaft through the gearbox. It is really a bleed system, but a sort of that it builds up the pressure and then blows it into the starter motor, and that then turns the engine. The GTS also automatically supplies fuel to the nozzles in the combustion chamber containing two igniter plugs, then when you light the match.. oh, ignite the fuel it starts up the Adour jet engine. So fuel cock off, and switch on the fuel pump... Then you press the Start/Relight button forward on the throttle, which is a sort of primer button, but it is building up the air pressure ready to flow it into the turbine starter, and priming the fuel into the engine. When ready or primed you get a green light GTS lit up ready on the right panel... Then you just flick the start switch to "Start". The Adour's startup sounds and start sequence is amazing, highly realistic and the sort of a grin of ear to ear of excitement! Loud, keep it loud... bugger the neighbours sort of loud. Engine LP shaft rotation indicator and RPM indicator wizz around into action... then you get a "Rotation" light come on! At this point you need to nudge the throttle slightly forward, and you get the same sort of fire up that you get in an airliner when you turn on the fuel switches at around 18-20 N2, but then the Adour powers up to full power. The CWS will show HYD and AC (1-3) warnings so you have to reset them on the upper left panel by pressing the buttons (arrows upper right). And you are good to go... remember there is an easy start feature in the menu that does all this for you, but in reality it isn't that hard... If you get the start sequence wrong though it is 3 min wait to retry for another engine start. Remember to turn on the oxygen (switch right middle console), if working correctly the flow is seen via a flicking on/off flow meter upper right panel... however the rear seat oxygen switch and flow meter does not work? Ready to fly... The parkbrake lever is hard to access (or find) far right down by the seat. When moving then be aware of the front nosewheel. First it has a very long trailing link, but it can be very flickery as well (It flickers badly even when standing still?), and so it is very easy for it to go quickly at an odd angle... it works and works fine, but you have to get used to it when taxiing, it is a bit like the A320's remote tiller feel. Sounds when taxiing are excellent, with all that turbine power but whistle flow aural. Note the mirror reflections of the explosive cord. Usually I find these internal mirrors are quite poor, but in here they are the opposite and have very good and realistic reflections. Flaps are set to "Mid" for takeoff, and required if you are carrying a lot of fuel and full armaments. Your forward view is quite restricted at the normal FOV setting (73º), you could make it higher, but that is not realistic either, but it is hard to look forward and read the lower instruments at the same time at this FOV... ... throttle up and you give the aircraft about 80% RPM, not too much to make sure at first the front gear is tracking correctly... gradually to 90% then a third down the runway you give the Hawk the full 100% thrust. You want to feel that punch in the back, you certainly get the thrust but it is more slower building up speed than you would think it would be... ... I found 160 knts to rotate (officially JF note 190 knts?), and you quickly need to get the flaps to zero 0º (500 ft!) and the gear up, so I flick both switches at the same time, but remember to counter the flap lift loss! Ground and air gear animations are excellent, aural retraction (and extraction) gear sounds are also top notch, and the aircraft's excellent FMOD 360º sound externally and in the cockpit is as expected at this level are extremely good.... and yes the hairs on you neck will stand up and get quickly prickly. The Hawk's feel depends on the weight, you feel the extra weight of the T1a fully loaded compared to the far lighter T1 trainer, and although you felt it a bit sluggish on the ground the aircraft will accelerate very quickly to 300 knts in the air, and even while climbing set at 90% thrust. The T1 can climb at a whopping usual 9,300 fpm and one aircraft was known to climb at 11,800 feet per minute, light of course, but that is still phenomenal. Other statistics are still overwhelming with a maximum speed of 1,040 Kph 658 Mph/572 Knts and a service ceiling of 50,000ft and a range of (with only internal fuel) 2,400 kilometers 1,490 MI/1,295 NMI. That acceleration can deceive you, if you don't watch your artificial horizon, as with a quick glance at the Vertical speed indicator it will surprise you, for when you think you are flying nice and level as but the Hawk is still actually climbing easily upwards, so you will need to be aware of the aircraft's tendency to keep on lifting even when you want level flight and the required need adjust to that flight pitch angle and thrust requirement. There are no helpers in here to fly the aircraft for you, so this is all stick and rudder flying. To make it a bit more easy than relaxing then adjust the trim... ... the main tailplane trim is hidden under a safety cover rear left console (arrowed) and it is tricky to use as it is electric, but to be honest I have struggled with all JustFlight trims as the Arrow lll was a nightmare to trim easily. The far back position makes it hard to use as well visually (Any keyboard/joystick trim ideas are even worse), but if you do finally get the vertical trim set then the Hawk feel nicely balanced and requires only slight adjustments to it's flight path, but still watch those wide vertical speed swings with any adjustment of thrust (certainly more power). This is an aircraft to fly in the focus and fine movements as than the chucking it all around the sky, although it is a lovely almost aerobatic machine. If you want to fulfill your Airshow fantasies then this is the best aircraft into doing so... Approaching EGOV (RAF - Valley) RWY 14, you keep the Hawk at 170 knts and 200 ft off the deck, and don't forget to wave as you flypast, then just power up and climb away at 2000fpm, yes it is all as good as you thought it would be! Getting the speed down can be tricky though. You do have a two-stage airbrake far rear under the fuselage, but remember if the wheels are down, it doesn't activate? So any serious rub off of speed has to be done before you extend the gear. The aircraft systems included here are very comprehensive. Most of the major systems are covered including... Fuel system, Electrical systems, Central Warning systems (CWS), Hydraulic systems, Flight Control systems, Communications Control System (CCS), Air-Conditioning systems and Oxygen systems, Engine systems (Including the comprehensive start up system) and all systems have built in failures, and in most cases more than one system can fail at a single time. Full details of each system are well detailed in the manual. Lighting Internal cockpit lighting is excellent, as three knobs adjust the main panel and the two side consoles front and rear... ... there is "Emergy" panel dim switch, but in reality you adjust the panel lighting down anyway from the very bright full panel setting. Note the great night glass canopy reflections and to also note the reflections on the instruments and glass cannot be switched off, which may annoy a few fliers. External has both (the same) taxi and landing light in the nose, that X-Plane wise is highly visible, navigation lights and selectable Anti-Collision red or white strobes. The white flashing strobes at night are highly visible in the cockpit, but realistic. Landing Time to land... fighter jets can be tricky to land, as they are built for the extremes of speed and manoeuvrability and not the basic areas of flying. 150 knts is a nice approach speed clean, but once the flaps are down full and the gear is extended then your goal is 130 knts, but be aware of the fall in performance below the 130 knt zone as it is severe... .... I have found several times at this point in the approach the aircraft will start to behave oddly, of which I call the "Wobbles", power percentage is critical in staying out of the zone, because if the aircraft starts doing the "wobble" then in over correcting, you can lose it... more power or stopping the stall doesn't really fix it either, but helps, so the best way to get out of it is just to abandon the landing, go around and get it better and cleaner in the next approach and not in trying to fight it. It is groove thing in that when you get the aircraft into that fine groove of approach and then controlling the speed, then it can all come clean... power off to around 110knts and let the Hawk sink down, but be aware that the final stall speed is around 106 knts which is very close to the 110 knts required. Flare and touchdown has to be smooth as the gear is very supple, get it wrong or hit the tarmac to quickly or too hard and the T1 will bounce, so there is a fair bit of skill required to land the Hawk smoothly and professionally, but then again this aircraft is not for the average flier. Liveries There is a bonanza of liveries available. Twelve are provided with the aircraft package, and another twelve are available as a separate livery pack. Focus is totally on the RAF and RAF Valley, with a few international airforce users, but no Australian livery version, which is an odd one? Blank is default... The free Christophe Red Arrows "Flag" is noted here (below right) as it is a great livery. _________________________________________________ Livery pack has some excellent RAF celebration and production factory designs... Summary X-Plane has had some very good fighters or military aircraft of this category, the best is the AMX jet, FA-18F Super Hornet, X-Trident Panavia Tornado and MiG-29. But all fall short mostly now, as in most cases they are still all X-Plane10 (or with minor X-Plane11 modifications) aircraft and in reality all are very dated, only the GR4 Tornado is really what you would call modern... also they are all not in this price range or quality class, so that leaves this Hawk T.1 all in a category on it's own. The price in the mid-40's of US Dollars is to be considered in this summary. Again no fighter has cost this much, so you are expecting a high level of quality and a load of features. Yes you get both, as the quality here is exceptional and there is a realism with the cockpit from the external and internal views that is certainly a new level of real world reflection and hence the exceptional glass. So the aircraft in design is certainly top notch, and so does the custom sounds live up to their high expectations as well, the start up engine noises are simply the best yet for a small jet engine. Features are very good as well, with the expected static elements, quick engine starts, aircraft stands, opening canopy and equipment bay and yes the animated pilots are also highly lifelike and can be inserted or not, and you can also have their visors up or down, shame you can't have one in the other seat while you are flying in the front or the rear. Also the menus are good, and better than the earlier JustFlight/Thranda menus, but are not movable or scalable. The version change from T1 to the T1a is a bit of an odd one, where as the T1 is the trainer, the T1a is the armed version, the menu option just adds on a small tail extension? So there are a few quirks with the aircraft, but all are rather minor. Aircraft dynamics are excellent, but require skill and focus, but that is what you need when flying a fast small jet, and it is all physical manual flying as well... the aim here is to out fly yourself, and fly the aircraft to the best of your ability to do so, then the rewards will come. It would have been or even will become even more interesting when the aircraft acquires the X-Plane 11.30 new particle effects, as that was one feature that really kept on coming back to me as I reviewed the aircraft.. I hope we don't have to wait too soon for an 11.30 update for the Hawk as those dynamics would be excellent here. The development process for this Hawk was quite long, but the results have been well worth the wait, and the aircraft is certainly more highly refined for that wait, and overall JustFlight/Thranda are bringing a very much more highly refined and detailed aircraft to X-Plane, yes they cost more, but to have this level of quality and design, then that is also required in the new higher level of simulation that is now available to X-Plane, and it is a level we only dreamed of a few years ago, and more so. So to that person who stood looking at an aircraft and wonders what is it REALLY like to sit in that display aircraft at an airshow, and to actually fly it... well now and here with this excellent JustFlight/Thranda Hawk Trainer you now finally have that answer... Highly Recommended. _____________________________________________________________________________________ The BAe Systems Hawk T1/A Trainer by JustFlight - Thranda Design is a new release for X-Plane11 and NOW available here at the X-Plane.OrgStore BAe Systems Hawk T1/A Trainer Price is US$44.95 Hawk T1/A Advanced Trainer Livery Pack is also available... Price is US$14.99 This aircraft is a noted aircraft for X-Plane11 only.  The aircraft is directly available from JustFlight as well. Features Model Accurately modelled Hawk T1 and T1A, built using real-world aircraft plans Numerous animations including a storage hatch, ram air turbine (RAT), canopy and crew ladder Ground equipment including chocks, access steps and engine intake covers 4096 x 4096 textures are used to produce the highest possible texture clarity PBR (Physically Based Rendering) materials with real-time environment reflections for superb quality and realism Detailed normal mapping for down-to-the-rivet precision of aircraft features Cockpit A truly 3D virtual cockpit right down to accurately modelled ejector seats and screw heads - every instrument is constructed fully in 3D with smooth animations Cockpit textures feature wear and tear based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Interactive checklists for every stage of flight Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'ready for take-off' (if aircraft is stationary on the ground) Fully functional and comprehensive IFR-capable avionics fit, including AN/ARC 164 UHF radio, plus a retrofitted modern AN/ARC-232 UHF/VHF unit and TACAN/ILS radio units Authentic head-up display (HUD) Interactive logbook panel for logging your flight details (X-Plane native) GoodWay compatible Adjustable canopy mirrors with real-time reflections of the environment Animated toe brakes Radio knob animations routed through plug-in logic, for optimum movement fidelity and sound synchronisation Aircraft systems Custom-coded electrical system with AC and DC resets and loads Realistic landing gear with slow/fast tyre rotation animation (blurry when rotating fast), precise shock absorber animation and wheel chocks Custom-coded hydraulic systems, including functioning RAT Realistic lighting system with rheostat controls Custom external light logic with custom strobe light pattern and custom light halos for added realism Capable of loading and firing X-Plane's default weapons. The currently selected loadout is automatically saved for the next flight. Requirements: X-Plane 11 CPU: Intel Core i5 6600K at 3.5GHz or faster 8GB RAM or more DirectX 12-capable graphics card from nVidia, AMD or Intel with at least 4GB VRAM (GeForce GTX 1070 or better or similar from AMD) Windows 10 / 7 / Vista / XP, MAC OS 10.10 (or higher) or Linux 2GB hard drive space _____________________________________________________________________________________ Installation: Download for the BAe Systems Hawk T1/A Trainer is 629.40mb and the unzipped file is deposited in the "General Aviation" X-Plane folder at 1.12gb (including all 24 liveries) Key authorisation and a restart is required. Documents: Highly detailed manual covers installation and all instrument notes, systems details, panel and menu guides and a basic tutorial flight. Hawk X-Plane manual (93 pages) ____________________________________________________________________________________  Review by Stephen Dutton  29th September 2018 Copyright©2018: X-PlaneReviews (Disclaimer. All images and text in this review are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions)  Review System Specifications: Computer System: Windows - Intel Core i7 6700K CPU 4.00GHz / 64bit - 16 Gb single 1067 Mhz DDR4 2133 - ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 8Gb - Samsung Evo 512gb SSD Software: - Windows 10 - X-Plane 11.25 Addons: Saitek x56 Rhino Pro system Joystick and Throttle : Sound - Bose Soundlink Mini Environment Engine by xEnviro v1.07 US$69.90 : XPRealistic Pro v1.0.9 effects US$19.95 Scenery or Aircraft- EGOV - RAF Valley for X-Plane 11 1.0.0 by RCMarple (X-Plane.Org) - Free! 
  14. News! - Released : Hawk T1/A Advanced Trainer by JustFlight/Thranda The sensational Hawk T1/A Advanced Trainer was announced by JustFlight/Thranda Design back in February earlier this year. And usually with such announcements then the release usually follows with a month or so? So the gestation period for the Advanced Trainer has been unusually long... The feature list (below) and the detailing quality is huge... Noted release comments: "The Hawk T1 has been modelled to an exceptional level of detail, featuring PBR materials with real-time environment reflections for superb quality and realism, 4096 x 4096 textures for the highest possible texture clarity, a variety of paint schemes (including the RAF and Red Arrows) and numerous animations. The aircraft features realistic payloads (including guided missiles, rockets, bombs, 30mm ADEN cannon gun pod, external fuel tanks, reconnaissance pod and Red Arrows diesel/dye smoke pod). Both the front and rear pilot positions are included, and the aircraft features a truly 3D virtual cockpit with smoothly animated 3D instruments and fully functioning custom-coded systems and avionics." Model Accurately modelled Hawk T1 and T1A, built using real-world aircraft plans Numerous animations including a storage hatch, ram air turbine (RAT), canopy and crew ladder Ground equipment including chocks, access steps and engine intake covers 4096 x 4096 textures are used to produce the highest possible texture clarity PBR (Physically Based Rendering) materials with real-time environment reflections for superb quality and realism Detailed normal mapping for down-to-the-rivet precision of aircraft features Cockpit A truly 3D virtual cockpit right down to accurately modelled ejector seats and screw heads - every instrument is constructed fully in 3D with smooth animations Cockpit textures feature wear and tear based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Interactive checklists for every stage of flight Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'ready for take-off' (if aircraft is stationary on the ground) Fully functional and comprehensive IFR-capable avionics fit, including AN/ARC 164 UHF radio, plus a retrofitted modern AN/ARC-232 UHF/VHF unit and TACAN/ILS radio units Authentic head-up display (HUD) Interactive logbook panel for logging your flight details (X-Plane native) Flight computer panel with useful information such as fuel burn, endurance, speed and wind speed/direction GoodWay compatible Adjustable canopy mirrors with real-time reflections of the environment Animated toe brakes Radio knob animations routed through plug-in logic, for optimum movement fidelity and sound synchronisation Aircraft systems Custom-coded electrical system with AC and DC resets and loads Realistic landing gear with slow/fast tyre rotation animation (blurry when rotating fast), precise shock absorber animation and wheel chocks Custom-coded hydraulic systems, including functioning RAT Realistic lighting system with rheostat controls Custom external light logic with custom strobe light pattern and custom light halos for added realism Capable of loading and firing X-Plane's default weapons. The currently selected loadout is automatically saved for the next flight. Liveries The Hawk T1 is supplied in the following twelve paint schemes: Hawk T1 Royal Air Force Early trainer livery, XX241 Hawk T1 Empire Test Pilots School livery, XX341 Hawk T1 Royal Air Force Valley, Central Flying Squadron, XX176 Hawk T1 Royal Air Force Camouflage scheme, XX353 Hawk T1 Royal Air Force 4 FTS, Welsh Dragon livery, XX172 Hawk T1 Royal Air Force 19 Squadron, RAF Leeming – XX329 Hawk T1 Royal Air Force Red Arrows 2011 livery XX260 Hawk T1A Royal Air Force 100 Squadron, Black livery, XX331 Hawk Mk 51 Finnish Air Force, HW-346 Hawk Mk 53 Indonesian Air Force, LL-5320 Hawk Mk 63 Royal Saudi Air Force, 79034 Hawk Mk 63 Swiss Air Force, U-1252T1 Other features Realistic and accurate flight dynamics based on real-world performance and handling data, and input from Hawk pilots Authentic sound set, generated using X-Plane's state-of-the-art FMOD sound system Custom sounds for switches, canopy, warnings and more, featuring accurate location placement of sounds in the stereo spectrum, 3D audio effects, atmospheric effects, adaptive Doppler, exterior sounds spill in when canopy is opened, different sound characteristics depending on viewing angle etc. Comprehensive manual with panel guide and performance data PSD Paint Kit included so you can create your own paint schemes Dedicated pop-up window for sound mixing, allowing for individual adjustment of the volume of exterior sounds, in-cockpit sounds and various effects System Requirements: X-Plane 11 CPU: Intel Core i5 6600K at 3.5GHz or faster 8GB RAM or more DirectX 12-capable graphics card from nVidia, AMD or Intel with at least 4GB VRAM (GeForce GTX 1070 or better or similar from AMD) Windows 10 / 7 / Vista / XP, MAC OS 10.10 (or higher) or Linux 2GB hard drive space Price is noted as ... £29.99 / €37.95 / $44.99 Now Available Just Flight Full X-PlaneReviews review to follow! ________________________________________ Product details and images are courtesy of JustFlight News by Stephen Dutton 25th September 2018 Copyright©2018: X-Plane Reviews Disclaimer. All images and text in this review are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions)
  15. Aircraft Review : Cessna 152 ll by JustFlight Thranda The choice of an aircraft to learn to fly on is very important, mostly in every case the training school provides the aircraft, so you don't personally get that choice anyway, but you could always hunt around the flying schools to get the machine you personally want but in most cases you will then pay for that privilege. However in most cases you will usually end up in a Cessna 150, the trainer "that trainers use" is the base line of the bulk of trainers, not that they are loved as nicknames for the 150 are not that particularly kind... "One Filthy", "The buck and a half" and "Cesspit" pretty well sums the 150 up... but the 150 series still do an important job, they get still get you into the air and at a reasonable cost. So how does this relate to X-Plane? Well it does and in a very significant way... one if you are going for your PPL (Private Pilot's Licence) then you will need a really good trainer to train on, I mean an almost perfect trainer. X-Plane provides the C172SP as does Airfoillab's, but in that aircraft's case it is a size larger than the C150 and in a way it is a very different aircraft as well, and so in a training situation you can't really substitute the 175 for the 150. Carenado do a C152 ll, but it was quite basic even in it's original form, as to date it hasn't yet had the XP11 treatment either... so that leaves this Cessna 152 ll by JustFlight/Thranda. Second point is that when you first fly in X-Plane you will usually go for the big 'uns", say the B737-800 or B747-800, but if you are really serious about flying in X-Plane then it comes to the point you really do have to go back to the absolute basics, that is no gimmicks, no navigation helpers, nothing, just you and the yoke, rudder pedals and learning to fly the aircraft correctly. The trick is that if you learn it right here it will then translate quite a lot to the other more exciting aircraft in X-Plane, I personally don't think I really mastered X-Plane until I mastered a really good GA, my trainer was the excellent Carenado A33F Bonanza, but that was more for the navigation aspect than the basic, basic skills that is required here in the C152. I also note many, many comments on what I call the "rushers", that are the new fliers in X-Plane who want to rush and go fly the big exciting stuff... we all do, but their mistakes are very funny and if totally avoidable by just learning the basics correctly, and this aircraft in the C152 ll is then your real starting point in flying correctly in the X-Plane simulator. Cessna 152 ll by JustFlight Thranda JustFlight/Thranda's TB10 Tobago & TB20 Trinidad and PA28R Piper Turbo Arrow III/lV have already been a huge success in X-Plane this year, and that is mostly with their extremely handing and performance, most notably many users will counter that vFlyteAir versions of the Arrow are better, but it is the unique skills that is really required to fly the JF Arrow and they take time to master, only now do I find I can fly it with confidence. So it is an interesting point that we now have the C152 ll from JustFlight/Thranda, and that point is that is it the best basic trainer in X-Plane, that is what this review is all about, but first let us look at the aircraft. I will state this is expensive for a GA aircraft at above the US$40+ mark... but you get your money's worth in the absolute quality on show here, as you should. The airfoillabs C172SP was the first GA to break the US$35+ barrier, but here is another marker that is set higher again. It doesn't have the absolute features of the AfL C172SP, but there is that real completeness and solidness and mostly that total realism of the C152 aircraft. Detailing is spectacular, and almost perfection when you get up real close... .... panels and detail is absolute, but more so is the wear and tear, Carenado are masters at this aspect, but it is far better again here, this aircraft certainly lives up to it's "One Filthy" moniker, but it wears it with pride, and so do you when you fly it, as all the areas that are worn and tired, but in a totally realistic point of view. This aircraft comes with the highly detailed normal mapping for down-to-the-rivet precision of it's aircraft features and of course the X-Plane PBR (Physically Based Rendering) materials with those real-time environment reflections. If you have VR (Virtual Reality) then you are in for a bonus as the aircraft is already VR compatible, but to see this machine close up externally through the VR aspect must be a moment of realism par excellence. it looks excellent in 2d, so what it must be like in 3d must be incredible. It is in the small details like the wing aerofoil shape that says this is again that level of detail that is being delivered now in X-Plane. Watch the cables as they are exposed as come out of the rear fuselage to control the rudder, they are active and realistic, as are all the tie-down eyehooks on the aircraft, detail you pay for. Wheel assemblies are basic, but beautifully recreated and fully animated. Menu The menu is the standard JustFlight pop-out from the left side of your screen, the large arrow can be made transparent via your scroll wheel. Eighteen squares note your options. First Row: First two options open both front doors, Next is the GNS 430, the aircraft is not actually fitted with the X-Plane native GNS430, but the panel is still accessible via the menu option. Next is the toggle interior glass dynamic reflections and instrument glass dynamic reflections. then there is a clever toggle feature that I have used many times of the overhead dome light if the engine is running, or the flashlight when for starting from cold and dark. Second Row: First selection opens an empty glovebox, far right, toggle for altimeter barometric pressure scale between InHg and mb. Toggle for the automatic fuel selector, which will automatically switch the fuel tanks every 20 minutes to avoid fuel imbalance, toggle for the Refill menu window... for Fuel, Battery Voltage and you can simulate Spark Plug fouling and Vapour lock. Weight and Balance window that is a bit basic compared to others but it works well as you can still adjust the two passengers weights and baggage via a animated graph, Fuel can also be set and the results in lbs and inches weights are all listed below. There is a sound adjustment panel that covers Master, Avionics, Gyro/Pump, Radios, Enviro and UI sound volumes and the look of the panel and use is excellent. Third Row: Includes Quick Start (invaluable), Checklist which comes in a very nice clipboard folder (above right), a "Flight Computer" panel is certainly very handy for longer distance flying as it shows you your fuel flow and estimated endurance and range and used fuel, speeds and wind. There are two native X-Plane items in logbook and Ground handling? and the final selection in Static Elements...  Elements include Chocks, Tiedowns, Tow bar (useless unlike the FS/P3D version which works) and the young single pilot disappears... note the power has to be off for the static elements to work. Both aircraft doors open, but it is not a two latch system like on the other JustFlight aircraft, a single latch movement does the job here. Both the door windows open as well. Panel is basic, but not as stark as the Carenado C152, in fact the facia padding gives it a quality feel. Cabin is tight at just under 40" across by 42" high and 56" long... very tight, "shoulder to shoulder" tight. Nice big rear window(s) to watch your rudder and elevator movements. Only two seats, but detail is very good with quality fittings including above lighting, Beige is the cabin colour with a brown panel upper and dark blue lower instrument facia. First things you notice when you sit in the pilot's seat are the two air-vents that pop-out internally from the forward part of the high-wing layout... ... they channel air in via vents from forward edge of the wings, the right side one also has a built in temperature gauge, here they are both animated to move realistically in and out, but rotate as well. (hairdryer required for realism). Instrument Panel For a trainer the C152 has a well specialised panel layout. This is the C152 ll version, the ll (Two) is designated for the advanced avionics package "Nav Pac" for IFR training use. A trainer has to have the Standard Six instruments that are centred correctly in line of sight of the flying pilot with the Airspeed Indicator, Artificial Horizon and the Attitude Indicator on the top row with a clock separating the Artificial Horizon and the Altitude Indicator. Below is the Turn Coordinator, Heading Dial and Vertical Speed Indicator. Two instruments right cover a CDI or Course Deviation Indicator (VOR 1) which is slightly different from the heading dial version, lower is an ADF pointer dial... Far right panel is a RPM x100 gauge and a Amperes gauge, a DATCOM hours meter sits below. Lower left panel covers the park brake, and the two tanks gauges with 26 GAL fuel capacity, and oil Temp/Pressure gauges. lower is the Primer (fuel), master, start, and electrical switchgear. Elevator trim, Carb Heat, Throttle (knob), Mixture (knob) and flaps in four positions of 0º-10º-20º-30º degrees. All lower circuit breakers (poppers) do work, and are active two ways, one to break the circuit to the item noted, and two they will induce failures if you use or push the item beyond it's operating limits... Radio equipment provided is basic but very realistic. There is a Bendix/King KMA 20 communications radio, Bendix/King KX 175B Comm 1/Nav1 unit, and vintage Aircraft Radio Corp. 300 R546E ADF Receiver and a Aircraft Radio Corp. RT-359A transponder. A nice feature on both yokes is a button (upper right) that brings up the X-Plane ATC panel. Flying the C152 ll The 152 was based on the earlier Cessna 150 including a number of minor design changes and a slightly more powerful engine running for running on 100LL aviation fuel. It was powered by a Lycoming O-235-L2C flat-4 engine, 110 hp (82 kW) driving a 69-inch (175 cm), two-blade, fixed-pitch McCauley propeller... the C150 had the lesser 100 hp (75 kW) powerplant. The Lycoming O-235-L2C will start quite easily, as long as you give the primer a few pumps and set the mixture to half, and the throttle to about an third. In colder conditions then you will need the Carb Heat and a bit more patience Sounds are instantly instinctively highly realistic, FMOD also, but excellent. With most GA's from cold I let the C152 warm up the temperatures, before moving off, a few minutes will settle them correctly. I have my x56 Rhino twin-throttle set as one lever (left) for the throttle and the other lever (right) as the mixture, and for taxi just two-thirds mixture is about right for the movement speed and control with the throttle inputs... Number one important note here is the aircraft's trim, or trim wheel... for takeoff you have to set it to the middle "TAKE OFF" position via the huge trim wheel... .... then mixture to rich and it is throttle up and away you go! The C152 has surprisingly a lot of power and the speed builds quite quickly with not that much left pull from the prop, rotate is around 70kts and the aircraft is very light for movement on the controls. Climb is noted at 700fpm, but you can easily with the power available here still keep a 650fpm climb and not lose speed. One thing you really quickly notice in the air is that the feedback from this aircraft in X-Plane11 is excellent, as it should be. This is the point of this aircraft, the way you are really flying it and that important reaction from your inputs to the controls.... If you don't smile at this point in this C152, then your just not cut out to be pilot. This is the point you start to work on your skills, your hand to eye co-ordination and smooth turn and climb inputs, get it right and you will feel like a pro. This aircraft works with you and you get the aural and physical feedback to your movements. Once leveled off at your required altitude it is time to trim the aircraft, This is the most important aspect of the flight... balance. You have to originally twiddle with small down trim adjustments to get it right, but then you should find that balance and if correct then you should be able to take your hands and feet off the controls and the aircraft should simply balance and fly straight and stay there correctly. After a few flights you should be able to pick that perfect trim position directly, but first you have to find it. The trim is only for the elevation here, and not for rudder yaw, so there will always be the need to hold the yoke a little to the right to counter the prop thrust, however it only a light touch required to keep the aircraft in a straight line. You need this as there is no autopilot in here, so as little work to do on the controls will help with the workload, in all cases the aircraft should literally fly itself if the trim is correctly set. A note that if you reduce or put on more power the trim will go out, mostly if you reduce the power it will allow you to descend still under the same trim, and increasing the power to the same RPM as before should bring the trim back into balance. Any bank will need slight pressure on the yoke backwards to counter the dropped wing, if correct the aircraft will bank but hold still its altitude for a clean turn... ... once straight again the aircraft should simply go back to it's former trim balance. In a nutshell that really sums up this C152 here, set it up correctly and it will do all the work, but you have to fly it with skill and a light sweet touch. There is a realism provided in this aircraft, that it is a perfect trainer, the glass and reflections are all part of the package as are the 180º sounds, you won't better this feel for taking your first flying steps towards the real aircraft. The C152 is created for mostly going around in circles, or circuits, than flying point to point. The range is only 690nm, but mostly you only use a 350nm radius, and your altitude is 14,700ft (in other words by the time time you achieve your ceiling it will be time to come straight back down again). It's not a fast aircraft either, at around 100knts, with max speed at only 110knts, but speed is not what this aircraft is about. There is no course pointer in the 152 to help you in flying circuits, so your heading dial is important, first make sure it is is calibrated with the compass correctly... KIDA - Idaho's main runway is 20/02 so you need to set the heading compass dial to the correct heading setting (compass). From then on 90º turns can be achieved by first using the side pointers to hold the runway headings horizontal, then the second downwind 90º turn to the heading of the runway's opposite heading. Another 90º is towards the runways centreline, again note the horizontal heading position... Final upwind 90º turn to the runway heading (20º) and you have two helpers in an ADF pointer (if the ADF is situated there) and the ILS align CDI (If the runway has ILS Alignment). This is all of course basic flying skills, but practise can make you pretty proficient in using them, and here the C152 gives you a great platform to practise those skills. Get it all right and the runway should be where you expect it to be... Landing the C152 is quite easy, if you get the numbers correct... 80knts is a nice approach speed and then for setting the 10º flap then 70knts is perfect, the next flap 20º setting should set you around 60knts... ... 55knts is fine for the 30º flap and the final approach speed. The flap operating range is 35knts - 85knts and the stall is around 48knts clean and 43knts flaps down. There is no flap lift if you get those numbers correct and the C152 is a pretty stable aircraft right down to the runway. I will admit that my x56 Rhino throttle can make a huge difference in throttle response and controlling the final flare speed at 52knts. The point to make is the flying here is quite simple, but the C152 from JustFlight/Thranda gives you the perfect feedback to get it right, and that is what is important here, everything including the feel allows you to learn and control the aircraft to a high and realistic degree. And in that context this C152 is highly impressive. A new feature with this C152 and all coming JustFlight/Thranda aircraft is the end-user configurability (via the Manifest.json file). This file allows you to tweak the aircraft's performance and many the areas on the aircraft as these new SASL3_Tbient (Plugin) planes are now highly configurable for end-users. So if you want to more personalise the aircraft to replicate a real world machine, or just don't like the standard strobe light pattern, you can now change it to your wishes, the "Manifest.json file" can be found in the aircraft's root folder. Lighting The lighting internally is basic but still pretty good. There is panel adjustment for instrument back lighting, and avionics, but the avionic detail is quite small. There is one internal central roof light that is very good in illuminating the cabin and the panel. Externally there is a combination taxi and landing light that is quite powerful in use. The rest is a red tail beacon, navigation lights and the new style wing strobe lights. Liveries There are eight Liveries provided and are all excellent in 4K Hi-Def resolution ... G-BGAE is the set default of the real-life C152, G-BGAE, based at Conington Airfield that was the aircraft at the basis of this simulation version. Summary There is no doubt this Cessna 152 ll from JustFlight/Thranda is very impressive, but not in the context you think it is. Yes it is loaded with features, but at that US$40+ price then it should be. But the real point is that the C152 is a basic trainer par excellence, and at it's heart it is a very simple aircraft to set up and fly. This is the aircraft to learn the basics on, the simple stuff, because this aircraft really gives you right feedback on what your flying skills are doing correctly or incorrectly... if any X-Plane aircraft that should be a flying school standard then this is it. Many will note that the JustFlight C152 is also in FS/3PD, but this version comes with the more realistic X-Plane dynamics, in real feel handling and environmental feedback, it is a super balanced aircraft to fly, once flown you want more of that real deal feel. It is also already VR (Virtual Reality) compatible, so that makes it even more realistic for training and constant circuit practise. Detail and quality is phenomenal, so realism is part of the package. So is this C152 ll now the current best training aircraft in X-Plane? Well everyone can have a serious debate about that, but for me I think it is, and will be for quite a long time in the future as well, it just really delivers in that most crucial of areas, the real "seat of your pants" flying machine for learning to fly with. It is highly addictive as well, so if you are looking for the very best basic trainer in X-Plane then this is it but it comes at a cost... Highly Recommended. ______________________________________________________________________ Yes! the Cessna 152 ll by JustFlight Thranda is available from the X-Plane.Org Store here : Cessna 152 ll Price is US$41.99 Features: MODEL Accurately modeled C152, built using real-world aircraft plans and comprehensive photography of the real aircraft Numerous animations, including windows, doors, air vents, sun visors, map compartment and realistically animated ignition keychain that responds to G-forces Ground equipment including chocks and tie-downs Authentic labelling and placards based on those found in the real aircraft, including unique airworthiness documentation for each livery based on the country of origin HD textures are used to produce the highest possible texture clarity and immersion PBR (Physically Based Rendering) materials with real-time environment reflections for superb quality and realism HDR lighting (real-time illumination of interior and exterior surfaces) Detailed normal mapping for down-to-the-rivet precision of aircraft features COCKPIT A truly 3D virtual cockpit right down to accurately modeled seat belts and screw heads - every instrument is constructed fully in 3D with smooth animations Cockpit textures feature wear and tear based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Full VR support (VR manipulators, camera snap points, tweaked for comfortable usage) Interactive checklists for every stage of flight Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'ready for take-off' (if aircraft is stationary on the ground) Fully functional and comprehensive IFR capable avionics fit including: KMA 20 audio selector unit KX 175B COM 1 / NAV 1 radio RT-359A transponder unit ADF 300 unit with ADF/REC/BFO modes Interactive logbook panel for logging your flight details (X-Plane native) Flight computer panel with useful information such as fuel burn, endurance, speed and wind speed/direction GoodWay compatible Ability to change barometric units from InHG to MB in altimeter adjustment Option to activate flashlight from within pop-up window, to aid in those pitch-black cold and dark starts at night Option to remove window and instrument reflection effects Animated toe brakes Radio knob animations routed through plugin logic, for optimum movement fidelity and sound synchronization AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS Custom-coded electrical system with functional circuit breakers. Circuit breaker logic is linked to X-Plane's internal failure logic, so if the plane is set to fail a certain electrical component after a certain number of hours, the circuit breaker for that element will pop out. Realistic landing gear with slow/fast tyre rotation animation (blurry when rotating fast), and wheel chocks and tie-downs Functioning carburettor heat and primer controls Dedicated interactive engine pop-up window displaying values such as fuel tank weights and imbalance, fuel pressure, oil pressure, oil temperature, battery charge (with quick charge option), and information about spark plug fouling and vapour lock condition Simulated vapour lock condition, with warning pop-up and suggested actions Simulated spark plug fouling condition, with indication of percentage of fouling Lighting system includes separate lighting control for gauges (via rheostat) and realistic implementation of radio light rheostat Custom external light logic with custom strobe light pattern and custom light halos for added realism OTHER FEATURES Realistic and accurate flight dynamics based on real-world performance and handling data, and input from C152 pilots Stunning audio effects - atmospheric distance, multi-layered engine, individual click spots, aerodynamic effects and electrical system sounds, made possible by X-Plane's state-of-the-art FMOD sound system Custom sounds for switches, doors, warnings and more, featuring accurate location placement of sounds in the stereo spectrum, 3D audio effects, atmospheric effects, adaptive Doppler, exterior sounds spill in when window or door(s) are opened, different sound characteristics depending on viewing angle etc. Comprehensive manual with panel guide and performance data PSD Paint Kit included so you can create your own paint schemes Dedicated pop-up window for sound mixing, allowing for individual adjustment of the volume of exterior sounds, in-cockpit sounds and various effects Custom weight and balance manager window End-user configurability (via Manifest.json file) ______________________________________________________________________ Requirements : X-Plane 11 CPU: Intel Core i5 6600K at 3.5GHz or faster 8GB RAM or more DirectX 12-capable graphics card from nVidia, AMD or Intel with at least 4GB VRAM (GeForce GTX 1070 or better or similar from AMD) Windows 10 / 7 / Vista / XP, MAC OS 10.10 (or higher) or Linux 2GB hard drive space ______________________________________________________________________ Installation : Download is 638.90mb which is unzipped and is inserted in your General Aviation folder as a 664.90mb flie. Key authorisation is required. Documentation : includes Comprehensive manual with panel guide and performance data There is an excellent POH and FAA Approved manual by the KCN Aero Club, that is well worth downloading for detailed flying of the Cessna152 ______________________________________________________________________  Review by Stephen Dutton 29th May 2018 Copyright©2018: X-Plane Reviews (Disclaimer. All images and text in this review are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions) Review System Specifications: Computer System: Windows - Intel Core i7 6700K CPU 4.00GHz / 64bit - 16 Gb single 1067 Mhz DDR4 2133 - ASUS GeForce GTX 1080 8Gb - Samsung Evo 512gb SSD Software: - Windows 10 - X-Plane 11.20 Addons: Saitek x56 Rhino Pro system Joystick and Throttle : Sound - Bose Soundlink Mini Plugins: Environment Engine by xEnviro v1.07 US$69.90 : XPRealistic Pro v1.0.9 effects US$19.95 : WorldTraffic 3.0 Plugin - US$29.95 Scenery or Aircraft - KIDA - Idaho Falls - by Turbulent Designs (X-Plane.OrgStore) - US$25.90
  16. News! - Now Released - Cessna 152 ll from JustFlight/Thranda Only weeks after their excellent TB10 Tobago & TB20 Trinidad release then JustFlight/Thranda are already back with another aircraft... Coming very soon is the X-Plane11 version of their Cessna 152 ll with the 110-hp (82-kW) Lycoming O-235-L2C piston engine, note the ll (Two) version is designated for the advanced avionics package "Nav Pac" for IFR use. We got an early look at the aircraft and as expected it is another little gem from JustFlight. This is overall just a basic trainer, that is it what it was built for and that is exactly what the C152 does is in being delivered here, and now it has been released. Quality is outstanding, and the C152 is a bit weary, teary... to the good of course. Flying performance and dynamics are excellent, perfect control and balance, for the "seat of the pants" fliers, they will simply love this aircraft's capabilities. Internally the aircraft is nicely kitted out and well trimmed, not a lot of do,da's in autopilot or avionics, but that is not what this tiddler is all about, panel finish is excellent. A quick circuit and I quickly loved the handling and fine control.. The C152 comes with the standard JustFlight menu... with opening doors/windows, checklist, sound panel (FMOD Sounds), Flight Computer and Refill menu window... for Fuel, Battery Voltage and a Weights & Balance panel is now standard as well. Official details include: MODEL Accurately modelled C152, built using real-world aircraft plans and comprehensive photography of the real aircraft Numerous animations, including windows, doors, air vents, sun visors, map compartment and realistically animated ignition keychain that responds to G-forces Ground equipment including chocks and tie-downs Authentic labelling and placards based on those found in the real aircraft, including unique airworthiness documentation for each livery based on the country of origin HD textures are used to produce the highest possible texture clarity and immersion PBR (Physically Based Rendering) materials with real-time environment reflections for superb quality and realism HDR lighting (real-time illumination of interior and exterior surfaces) Detailed normal mapping for down-to-the-rivet precision of aircraft features COCKPIT A truly 3D virtual cockpit right down to accurately modelled seat belts and screw heads - every instrument is constructed fully in 3D with smooth animations Cockpit textures feature wear and tear based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Full VR support (VR manipulators, camera snap points, tweaked for comfortable usage) Interactive checklists for every stage of flight Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'ready for take-off' (if aircraft is stationary on the ground) Fully functional and comprehensive IFR capable avionics fit including: - KMA 20 audio selector unit - KX 175B COM 1 / NAV 1 radio - RT-359A transponder unit - ADF 300 unit with ADF/REC/BFO modes Interactive logbook panel for logging your flight details (X-Plane native) Flight computer panel with useful information such as fuel burn, endurance, speed and wind speed/direction GoodWay compatible Ability to change barometric units from InHG to MB in altimeter adjustment Option to activate flashlight from within pop-up window, to aid in those pitch-black cold and dark starts at night Option to remove window and instrument reflection effects Animated toe brakes Radio knob animations routed through plugin logic, for optimum movement fidelity and sound synchronisation AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS Custom-coded electrical system with functional circuit breakers. Circuit breaker logic is linked to X-Plane's internal failure logic, so if the plane is set to fail a certain electrical component after a certain number of hours, the circuit breaker for that element will pop out. Realistic landing gear with slow/fast tyre rotation animation (blurry when rotating fast), and wheel chocks and tie-downs Functioning carburettor heat and primer controls Dedicated interactive engine pop-up window displaying values such as fuel tank weights and imbalance, fuel pressure, oil pressure, oil temperature, battery charge (with quick charge option), and information about spark plug fouling and vapour lock condition Simulated vapour lock condition, with warning pop-up and suggested actions Simulated spark plug fouling condition, with indication of percentage of fouling Lighting system includes separate lighting control for gauges (via rheostat) and realistic implementation of radio light rheostat Custom external light logic with custom strobe light pattern and custom light halos for added realism There are seven Liveries provided and are all excellent... G-BGAE is the default. Requirements: X-Plane 11 CPU: Intel Core i5 6600K at 3.5GHz or faster 8GB RAM or more DirectX 12-capable graphics card from nVidia, AMD or Intel with at least 4GB VRAM (GeForce GTX 1070 or better or similar from AMD) Windows 10 / 7 / Vista / XP, MAC OS 10.10 (or higher) or Linux 2GB hard drive space Price is as was noted... US$41.99 Now Available Just Flight ________________________________________ Product details courtesy of JustFlight News Updated by Stephen Dutton 25th May 2018 Copyright©2018: X-Plane Reviews Disclaimer. All images and text in this review are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions)
  17. Aircraft Review : TB10 Tobago & TB20 Trinidad by JustFlight/Thranda for X-Plane11 I own and drive a French car. My first French car was a Peugeot 505 and I didn't keep it very long because it was riddled with electrical issues that were the sort that if you left the battery connected it could simply go on fire. But there was something wonderful about it (when it ran correctly which wasn't very often) that I connected with, it was quirky, but had features that were very clever and it handled like nothing else. So with the next few cars in my life I missed the quirkiness and they all felt ordinary (i.e. boring) compared to the 505. So when I bought my current Peugeot 406 I pulled it apart in front of its previous owner to make sure it was solid... It was and I have had it now for 13 Years. I can't sell it, because what would I replace it with... something boring. It is a French thing, a sort of "je ne sais quoi" as you can't really put your finger on it, but it's just different and not of the everything else. And so are aircraft the same... I think so, the Airbus A320 is very different from the Boeing 737 and yet they do exactly the same thing. In general aviation the American aircraft have totally dominated the genre for decades, but a few European designs have also done very well. One is French in SOCATA (Societe de Construction d'Avions de Tourisme et d'Affaires) with their Rallye family (3,300 sold!) and in the early 70's they wanted a bigger aircraft than the Ralle for the very lucrative four-seater market, or in other words to "Take on the Yanks". The current Rallye could actually squeeze in four people, but it was in reality only a two seater and its performance and the range was small. This resulted in the TB series or as they have become known the "Caribbean Planes" as all the aircraft were named after Caribbean Islands, TB by the way is designated by the city of Tarbes, the French city as where the aircraft is manufactured. As with the Rallye the TB Series was just as successful with over 2,150 aircraft built, the last aircraft produced was in the early 2000's as sales dropped off after the 9/11 event, but many are still flying and the aircraft are immensely popular. So here is from JustFlight and Thranda their second type of X-Plane aircraft release after the Arrow lll/lV series with the TB10 Tobago and the TB20 Trinidad. The differences are small, but the Tobago is the earlier 180 horsepower (134 kW) fixed wheeled version and the Trinidad is the later more powerful 250 horsepower (186 kW) aircraft fitted with retractable tricycle landing gear. Here are the two types, first the TB10 Tobago... The aircraft is a 1975 era lovely all-metal, cantilever low wing, single-engine aircraft design, with a quite wider than tall cabin at 49 inches (124 cm) at the shoulder, plus or minus. In part, this is due to the fuselage having a pronounced "round out" above the wing. Adding in to the actual spaciousness, the side windows extend up well into the roof line, giving the Socata a very airy feeling inside and that it can also (squeeze) in the rear seat three passengers across a bench seat. This wider cabin does however come with a few negatives in weight and speed compared to a similar American design, but owners have reflected that it is minimal tradeoff to the light, nice handling and the overall general comfort that the aircraft provides. The TB10's 180 horsepower (134 kW) Lycoming O-360 piston engine gives the aircraft a top speed of VNE of 165ktns and VNO cruise of around 128knts. TB20 Trinidad The Trinidad came along five years later with the more powerful 250 horsepower (186 kW) Lycoming IO-540 six cylinder piston engine, and was fitted with retractable tricycle landing gear. Weight was up 100kgs to 800kgs (empty) but VNE was now 187knts and VNO cruise was up to 150knts, service ceiling was up to 20,000ft (from 13,000ft) and the range was extended out from 697nm to 1,100nm. You get both aircraft in the JF/Thranda package and the type version is selected via the choosing of the livery, of which there are six liveries for each of the different aircraft type. A note in that the personal settings you set for one are then available in the other, so you don't have to do your settings twice for each aircraft. Another note on this aircraft selection setup in the X-Plane replay still also views the aircraft as one .acf load and not separate individual loads? So you must make sure that the aircraft you want to replay is the same aircraft you saved the aircraft in and the aircraft version is currently viewable in X-Plane, or you may get the wrong aircraft in the replay? This is originally like all of JustFlight's aircraft a FlightSim/P3D design converted to X-Plane (by Thranda), so it is not a pure X-Plane construction, but like with the Carenado's we sort of get the best deal of the two simulators because of the use of X-Plane's more dynamic features and lighting. That said the aircraft is more of a semi-matt finish than a gloss exterior and this does give the aircraft a more FS feel overall than pure X-Plane, as the Arrow lll had a very nice glossy feel to it, it then felt more of the other way around. Detailing is however outstanding of which at this price it should be, but it is very good with a lot of wear and tear well produced here. It does feel very high mark Carenado than most, but that is not a bad thing. All riveting and panel design is first rate, but the highlight is the glass, here it is beautifully formed and reflections are about as perfect as you could get. I like the aerodynamic fences just in front of the windscreen, which is great detail, as are the row of HF and VHF Antenna on the roof. Tail is highly detailed and again with an addon aerodynamic device. Lower tailplane is really a one single (large) wing rightly positioned across the tail and is very effective, detailing again is excellent with rear navigation light and aircraft build plates under the tailplane. End of wing lighting assemblies cover landing and taxi lights, navigation and the well modeled globe strobe light, under wing is well constructed with even the bolts protruding out of the wings ... impressed. Undercarriage action is excellent, top-notch animations with all the links all separately animated, so the gear retraction or extension is highly realistic, even beautiful to watch... ... the wheels just don't move straight up or down, but sort of drag themselves into each position as they would on a real aircraft, hi fine detail. Construction detail of the wheel assemblies are also top-notch and beautifully crafted. Internal Design You pretty well know that an French aircraft is not going to be internally like a Cessna, Piper or what have you. There is no flat panel with instruments affixed to gaze over, but there are instead separately boxed in instrument panels with a tall centre console, it is different with the same sorta feel I have with both my Peugeots, with the same but different and it all comes with a Gallic charm. The cabin fitout is a lot of grey with a few side blue highlights, and it is nothing like the glary red internals of the Arrow, and it is all even a bit on the dull side, but it is authentic. On various TB's the Instrument boxes are usually the same on the pilot's side but can be different height's depending on the instrument selection on the right side. Note the very nice clock built-in to the right yoke. I am still debating on if the texture feel on the instrument surrounds are right, the real cowling material is more of a hard looking, but softer to touch plastic, but here looks too hard, I think it is the colour that doesn't help as most material in TB cockpits are more a darker grey, some are light blue that dirty and wear very badly, But this is a tough material to replicate and overall the look is very good... Cabin fitout is excellent and highly detailed. There is a lot of different textures on show here from plastics to moldings and cloth/vinyl covered seats. The seats are very well done, but in some lighting conditions they come across as too glossy and a bit false, a few notches down in the gloss and think they would look better, the colour again doesn't help in it being a slate grey. Another point is that the seat inserts I think are cloth or that velour material, but the overt gloss again sorts of ruins that effect in certain lighting angles. In the footwells the rudder pedal assemblies are excellent with just a nice touch of chrome here and there, all items like the door catches have both French and English text for authenticity. There is a sort of sportscar feel in the cockpit that is heightened by the high and long centre console, Your fuel tank switch, large trim wheel (stabliser) and Knob (rudder) with Carburettor, Throttle, Prop and Mixture levers are all very handy for use. I particularly like the sticking up seatbelt locks that feel very 70's in their design. Menu The JustFlight style menu is the tab on the left side of your screen, and you can thankfully dissolve it or make it transparent by using your scroll wheel over it. The menu is boxed of over six across to four down in choices. Personally on the Arrow I thought it looked old fashioned, but I have got used to it as it is handy and easy to use. Top row covers the doors and walkaround items... By the menu you can open both forward doors, you can also open (and close) them manually by lifting the lever (like in the Arrow), which opens the door to a gap, and then pushing it up to fully open, and just grab the door to close and then relock. Walkaround menu items include ice fluid door and it also refills de-icing fluid, and opening Baggage door. Forward is the Oil check door and Engine inspection panel, sadly the cowling doesn't come off to see the full engine. Second menu row covers GTX 330 (transponder) pop-up window, GNC 255 pop-up, GNS 430 GPS popup (or the GTN750 payware add-on by RealityXP, if it is installed) and you can toggle window reflections, interior glass dynamic reflections and instrument glass dynamic reflections. there is a clever toggle feature that I have used many times of the overhead dome light if the engine is running, or the flashlight when starting cold and dark. Third Menu row covers a toggle for the KAP 150 (autopilot) pop-up, toggle for altimeter barometric pressure scale between InHg and mb. Toggle for the automatic fuel selector, which will automatically switch the fuel tanks every 20 minutes to avoid fuel imbalance, toggle for the Refill menu window... for Fuel, Battery Voltage and you can simulate Spark Plug fouling and Vapour lock. There is a Weight and Balance window (not actually on the Arrow), but it a bit basic compared to others (vFlyteAir's is excellent) but it works as you can still adjust the four passengers weights and baggage via a animated graph, Fuel can also be set and the results in lbs and inches are all listed below. There is a sound adjustment panel that covers Master, Avionics, Gyro/Pump, Radios, Enviro and UI sound volumes and the look of the panel and use is excellent. Fourth Menu row covers Quick Start (invaluable), Checklist which comes in a very nice clipboard folder, a "Flight Computer" panel is certainly very handy for longer distance flying as it shows you your fuel flow and estimated endurance and range and used fuel, speeds and wind. Like the Arrow there are two native X-Plane items in logbook and Ground handling? and the final Static Elements... Elements include Chocks, Tiedowns, Tow bar (useless unlike the FS/P3D version which works), Pitot and Engine inlet covers and a Yoke lock (that locks the yoke but the flying surfaces still move?) and some tiedown tools (weights?) that are attached to ends of the wings. Our friendly animated pilot also goes home with the static elements activated as well. As mentioned the Menu is quite comprehensive but basic in parts and very good in others, but it is very easy to use. And far bottom of the menu you can change the liveries inside the plane, I prefer to use the aircraft menu because of the two distinct types of aircraft. Flying both the Tobago and Trinidad First thing to note is the slightly different panel setup's between the two aircraft. In the TC10 the lower pilot's side panel is mostly blank... In the TB20 version the undercarriage switches and indications are set out here. Also different is the Emergency Landing Gear control (arrowed left) and the Alternator air control (arrowed right). Warning lights top panel have three lighting situations, Green for Normal, Amber (Yellow) for Caution and Red for immediate action required. As such there is no switchgear? The centre panel works by basically popping the fuses, Yellow button down for action and Red (or popping) for inactivity. The panel covers all the Lights, Master power and Alternator. Flap indicator and flap selection (Three Stage in Retracted - Takeoff - Landing) Fuse Panel is left and down of the pilot, There are three buses with: 60-amp ALTr – between the alternator and electrical system 70-amp BAT – between the battery and electrical system 30-amp BUS 1 – bus bar 1 supply 30-amp BUS 2 – bus bar 2 supply 30-amp BUS 3 – bus bar 3 supply Manual notes the fuses work, but I didn't get no actual actions (they all worked on the Arrow?). The centre ALT popper (arrowed) is interesting in that the circuit breaker is calibrated at 60 amps and limits the alternator electrical load to the battery and electrical system. So in the event of over-voltage, the alternator control unit cuts off the alternator field and the amber warning light labelled ‘ALTr’ illuminates on the top annunciator panel. I usually set my twin-throttle (X-56 Rhino) to one lever the throttle and the other lever for the mixture for single-engine flying, mostly to control the hi-speed while taxiing in leaning the mixture. I have the same set up here, but the lean was not really required. But if you do decide to use the lean, it then gives you a far wider range of speeds in the taxi so you can find the exact right speed you require. This range setup then gives you one of the most nicest taxiing aircraft in a GA I think I have used in X-Plane, you can adjust the speeds finely via the throttle to turn corners and sprint (if allowed) along long taxiways. If you listen to the sounds with the TB Series here, you will be impressed, good is an understatement, but you have to listen for the subtle more than the grandeur. A headset will help, but good bassy speakers are great as well. All sounds are 180º in spectrum, but in the startup and the adjustments of idle you will be inspired. To me good sound is the reflection of changes in your environment and of course engine tones, if the sounds match your actions perfectly you are on to a great thing in the overall realism of the moment. In most cases I have the instrument reflections switched on and still do here. But it does create a sort of greyness across the instruments in certain lighting conditions, and it doesn't look very realistic either? Turn the reflections off in the menu and the instruments are certainly far, far better and clearer. It is odd in that only the dials have the reflections, but it affects almost everything across the panels? Flaps are set to "Takeoff" and it is the difference of about 20knts in 75knts to 95knts in speed if you takeoff with the flaps retracted. This is the TB10, so when you rotate you don't do a high pitch, but more of the same, but with just a little nose up... Those flaps do however create more of a barrier than a help with their heavy drag (the TB20 is a little better with the extra power) so in in most cases a flaps up position is a better way to gain flight. The sounds are excellent from an idle of throbbing to the drum, drum of the power required for flying, the range of aural feedback throughout the throttle adjustment is also very, very good. +80knts and 600fpm will give you a nice power to climb ratio... 787fpm is max or recommended, the TB20 gives you far more room at 1200fpm, but the Tobago is not a fast or powerful aircraft, even by GA standards os you have to kind to the aircraft... ... but what the Tobago lacks in power it totally gains in handling... it is a simply amazing aircraft to fly, light movements and the total ease of control from the moment you leave the ground, as it is a really lovely thing to be in. I would certainly highly recommend this aircraft for any first time fliers, it is certainly one of the best to understand and feel what a good GA is really all about. It is also quite a contrast to the Arrow lll, which by all accounts was a serious challenge to fly, a more of a "take control of the beast" rather than an easy plane to fly, but don't get me wrong as that is the major huge attraction to that aircraft as well as if you get it right it is then extremely rewarding flying machine. A significant point that is noticeable about aircraft from JustFlight is that setting the trim balance is very important. Again the Arrow lll was very, very sensitive to its trim, and worse the position of the trim wheel well down low between the seats made it almost impossible to adjust (I did try to set this trim on the Rhino knob, but that just made it even 10 times worse). If you set the trim correctly before takeoff in the TB series the aircraft is fine, and adjustment is far easier to manage later as well as the trim wheel is easily in your same line of sight. The BendixKing KAP 150 autopilot is also light-years better than the cantankerous AutoControl IIIB in the Arrow, it is far more versatile as well and easy to operate (and it pops out for use). In cruise (slow in the TB10) the aircraft is a very nice pleasant place to fly, sounds are again really good, but the TB's can get a little engine drummy thrummy over a period of time, you either love it or get tired of the sound over distances (The Arrow was the same in this case as well). Instruments The instrument layout is quite basic, but it is still very flexible in use. Both yokes can be hidden, and on the pilot's yoke there is an autopilot disconnect, and trim switch. Co-Pilot's yoke gets that lovely clock to gaze at... Standard Six instruments that are centred in line of sight of the flying pilot with the Airspeed Indicator, Artificial Horizon and the Attitude Indicator on the top row and the Turn Coordinator, Heading Dial and Vertical Speed Indicators set out directly below and are lovely and clear (reflections off). On the right top is a Garmin OBS VOR indicator (VOR2) and the same ADF indicator below. Annunciators are positioned at the top. A Giro/Suction dial is lower panel. On the co-pilot's panel there is only the Artificial Horizon and the Attitude Indicator flying instruments, the others are engine or atmosphere related in two instruments that are lovely and set (at an angle towards the pilot) RPM dial and Manifold pressure (inHg) fuel flow/fuel pressure (gallons per hour / PSI) gauges. Far right is Cylinder Head Temperature (CHT) and Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) top, middle is a M377C outside air temperature (OAT) indicator and VDO hour meter bottom (same as a hobbs). There is a Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) switch (active) and a Stormscope -WXR. The Stormscope doesn't work like it does the FS version as it is restricted to the X-Plane weather system, so all it really does is show crosses of the storm? How effective this all is debatable. Lower right panel is a KR 87 – ADF set and a very comprehensive TKS – ice protection panel that has windshield de-ice (fluid) with default propeller and structural de-ice systems, but you have to make sure you keep your fluid topped up, the amount left (US Gallons) is shown on the panel. Cabin environmental panel is also active and effective. The lovely chrome vents are animated by both the outer and inner adjustments (arrowed). Top of the tall centre console is a pointer marker readout panel that covers (L to R) Oil temperature and Oil pressure indicators (L & R) Fuel tank quantity indicators and a Voltmeter, very distinctive it can be hard to read in daylight, but it is very authentic. Lower in the equipment avionics stack is a KMA 24H audio control panel, Native XP GNS 430 GPS / COM 1 / NAV 1 unit (or if required RealityXP GTN). A Garmin GNC 255 COM 2 / NAV 2 unit, Benedix/King KN 62A DME unit, Benedix/King KAP 150 autopilot unit and bottom a GTX 330 transponder unit. So the TB Series are both well equipped with gear and all the main avionic panels pop-out. Lower left panel are switches for NAV/GPS toggle button, Electrical attitude indicator (AI) power, Radio master switch (avionics), Autopilot power switch and DME NAV 1 / NAV 2 selector that selects whether the GNS 430 or GNC 255 is used as the input to the KN 62. (TB20 panel is shown with gear selector). Arriving back at KHAF and lining up on RWY30.... then speed control is essential with the TB Series, as the aircraft are well known for their poor low speed capabilities, but that doesn't mean they are not stable in the lower speeds, in fact I found it a nice platform if you stick within it's constraints. Like with all flying there is a trick to certain aircraft, but this one also has a nasty surprise? First after disconnecting the AP then make "really" sure the trim is centred, then lowering down to around 90knts is a nice clean approach speed. 85knts or lower is required for one flap down position... Then you will have your work cut out to get the speed down to 70knts or less to drop to the vital second flap position, minimum throttle and pitching the nose up can rub off speed, but it can also lose you height, if you are really good at it and get yourself into that almost stall zone of nose pitch and off throttle sink in that you can drain off the speed and then drop the flaps, and then with a push of the power to keep you still airborne... ... but try to be over smarty and drop the flap to "landing" too early or too fast and you will hit a brick wall as the aircraft will easily gain two hundred or three hundred feet in a moment and enough in height to tatally ruin your perfect approach. And that final flap positioning is also very draggy, draggy and almost arrester wire stall in effect, real stall noted is 53knts (keep it just slightly below 60knts) and you just don't want to go there. Throttle control is now everything in keeping and losing height, but I have done a few landings now in both variants and have had a simply perfect landing every time with perfect throttle control. Damn it is a nice aircraft to fly... ... as were the Arrow lll sort of intimidated you and pushed hard on your skills, the TB Series doesn't as it is peach to fly, but just be aware of that heavy flap drag... Lighting There are three knobs left on the main pilots panel that adjusts the forward lighting. Top knob is for the main instrument brightness, the two lower ones control two large lights above the pilots heads, so you can go from almost complete darkness to a very bright cabin lighting. The overheads do however give you a lot of control on how you light up the panels and consoles, so you can get the almost perfect lighting settings for night flying if you are willing to play with the adjustments (far bottom wide image)... The top marker gauges are lit by hanging bulbs, which is really well done, they are connected however to the main instrument lighting adjustment knob which means you can't have bright instruments without the bright bulbs. There is a roof light for the rear that is switched on via a roof switch. External lighting is very good, but a little too bright in the navigation and strobe lights, top beacon is nice and the two sets of lights for taxi and landing in the left wing are the modern halogen variety. A note for those who use the replay mode a lot, then keep the strobes off while flying, as they stay on and are quite bright in the replay and sort of spoil the effect in both day and night conditions... Liveries There is a blank for each variant, then five liveries again for each variant, all are very high quality 4K designs with a nice spread of registrations. Summary The release of JustFlight's/Thranda's Arrow lll series lifted the bar and price of general aviation aircraft into X-Plane. It was and still is a very good aircraft, but it did come with a certain convoluted aspect in that it was and still is only for the most skilled of fliers who could fly it really well. This Socata TB Series is really the totally opposite of the Arrow lll in that respect, as it is very easy and a really lovely aircraft to fly and highly accessible to early fliers and learners to get the feel of a high grade GA aircraft without all the sheer complexities that is involved with flying at that level. Only point to master however is the very forceful drag from the flaps, one position is so called easy, the down full position is harder to master if you are new to this aircraft flying thingy, but otherwise the aircraft is a total gem. Detail and feature wise then the Scoata twins are packed with everything you desire, but they are not cheap either, at least in this case you do get two interesting variants for the single price, and a very nice pair they both are. I have gotten used to the JustFlight vintage style menu system, mostly because it is very accessible and easy to use, but it still looks out of date compared to a lot of others. A lot of the quirks that annoyed in the Arrow lll's have been addressed here, this includes the resizing of pop-ups, Weights&Balance manager (if basic) and the Autopilot is far more easier to use and has more functions. The interior is not at all as dramatic as the Arrow lll's red overload, and in some views even a little bland as the textures are very hard to reproduce, the greyed out colour scheme doesn't help here either, but it is all very well done and looks authentic in most lighting conditions, a more darker grey contrast may have helped more out in like there is on the real designs. The instrument reflections bland out as well in certain lighting conditions and the seating is too glossy as well, and so overall the cockpit environment could have been a little more realistic compared to the overwhelmingly excellent Arrow interiors. Sounds are simply first rate with 3D audio effects in complete 180º, and with atmospheric effects, and adaptive Doppler effects, but overall it is the total realism that comes through, though the drum, drum in cruise could get boring even if it is perfectly real. Of course the pick is always going to be the TB20 of the pair. It is a lot faster, climbs far quicker and has a far better range, but in reality both aircraft are a lot of fun in the air, and ultimately that is their real attraction, They are just simply great aircraft to fly in the air and taxi around on the ground, quality costs of course, but certainly these French twins really deliver... Highly Recommended! ______________________________________________________________________ Yes! the TB10 Tobago & TB20 Trinidad by JustFlight/Thranda is NOW available from the X-Plane.Org Store here : TB-10 TOBAGO & TB-20 TRINIDAD Also Available from JustFlight Price is US$41.99 Features Model Accurately modelled TB-10 Tobago and TB-20 Trinidad, built using real-world aircraft plans Numerous animations including passenger doors, baggage door, cockpit window, sun visors, oil cover and dipstick, engine access door, TKS fluid door and NACA ducts Ground equipment including chocks, pitot cover, engine intake covers and tie-downs 4096 x 4096 textures are used to produce the highest possible texture clarity Bump and specular mapping used throughout the aircraft to produce a truly 3D feel Engine exhaust vibration effects Cockpit A truly 3D virtual cockpit right down to accurately modelled seatbelts, screw heads and animated seat backs - every instrument is constructed fully in 3D with smooth animations Cockpit textures feature wear and tear (and even fingerprints!) based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Interactive checklists for every stage of flight Panel state system which will automatically save the panel state whenever a flight is saved and reload the panel state whenever that flight is loaded Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or ready for take-off Numerous 2D pop-up panels are included to provide easy access to cockpit controls and instruments, all accessible from an unobtrusive panel selector Fittable control lock for preventing control surface movement or insertion of ignition key Fully functional and comprehensive IFR capable avionics fit including: - KMA 24H audio selector unit - GNS 430 COM 1 / NAV 1 radio and GPS unit - GNC 255 COM 2 / NAV 2 radio unit with frequency databases, recently used frequencies and flight timers - KN 62 DME unit which can display information from NAV 1, NAV 2 or its own inbuilt receiver (NAV 3) - KAP 150 autopilot unit with navigation, heading, altitude and pitch hold modes, and self-test functionality - GTX 330 transponder unit with flight timers, altitude information and monitoring - KR 87 ADF unit with active and standby frequencies, mode selection and flight timers Functional WX-1000 Stormscope with integrated TCAS and checklists Interactive logbook panel for logging your flight details (FSX and P3D v1-v3 only) Ice protection system with fluid quantity indication Flight computer panel with useful information such as fuel burn, endurance, speed and wind speed/direction Independently operated left and right panel instruments including attitude indicator and altimeter Cockpit vibration effects Flight1 GTN 650/750 integration in the virtual cockpit – toggle between the GNS 430 or GTN 650/750 (Flight1 GTN 650/750 sold separately) using a simple-to-use switcher tool Aircraft systems Custom-coded fuel system including the option to have automatic switching of the fuel tanks for use on those long distance cross-country flights Custom-coded electrical system with busbars and functional circuit and switch breakers Realistic landing gear system with emergency release on the TB-20 Functioning alternate air and standby vacuum controls Failures including spark plug fouling, limited battery life, vapour lock and more Realistic engine oil and TKS fluid usage, and battery drain Preferences (GPS choice, engine failures and sounds) are saved and restored on every flight Refill menu – pop-up menu for refilling engine oil, TKS fluid and fuel, and recharging the aircraft battery _____________________________________________________________________________________ Requirements: X-Plane 11 CPU: Intel Core i5 6600K at 3.5GHz or faster Video card: 4GB VRAM (GeForce GTX 1070 or better or similar from AMD) Windows 10 / 7 / Vista / XP, MAC OS 10.10 (or higher) or Linux 1GB hard drive space Installation Download of the TB Series is 642mb and it is installed in your General Aviation Folder as a 807mb folder. Documents Documentation is excellent with one (large) manual included: TB-10 TB-20 X-Plane manual The main aircraft manual covers everything including aircraft install, data with a fully detailed instrument locations and feature points and aircraft procedures and Checklists (124 pages) TB_Paintkit (photoshop) is also provided _____________________________________________________________________________________ Review by Stephen Dutton 7th May 2018 Copyright©2018: X-PlaneReviews (Disclaimer. All images and text in this review are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions) Review System Specifications: Computer System: Windows - Intel Core i7 6700K CPU 4.00GHz / 64bit - 16 Gb single 1067 Mhz DDR4 2133 - GeForce GTX 980/SSE2 - Samsung Evo 512gb SSD Software: - Windows 10 - X-Plane 11.20 Addons: Saitek x56 Rhino Pro system Joystick and Throttle : Sound - Bose Soundlink Mini Plugins: Environment Engine by xEnviro v1.07 US$69.90 : XPRealistic Pro v1.0.9 effects US$19.95 Scenery or Aircraft - KHAF - Half Moon Bay by Rising Dawn Studios (X-Plane.OrgStore) - US$19.00
  18. News! - Just Flight release new Aircraft in TB10 Tobago & Trinidad JustFlight have released their next aircraft in the French Socata TB series of the TB10 Tobago & Trinidad. Feature list is HUGE, but so is the price at US$41.95 Model Accurately modelled TB-10 Tobago and TB-20 Trinidad, built using real-world aircraft plans Numerous animations including passenger doors, baggage door, cockpit window, sun visors, oil cover and dipstick, engine access door, TKS fluid door and NACA ducts Ground equipment including chocks, pitot cover, engine intake covers and tie-downs 4096 x 4096 textures are used to produce the highest possible texture clarity PBR (Physically Based Rendering) materials with real-time environment reflections for superb quality and realism Detailed normal mapping for down-to-the-rivet precision of aircraft features Cockpit A truly 3D virtual cockpit right down to accurately modelled seat belts and screw heads - every instrument is constructed fully in 3D with smooth animations Cockpit textures feature wear and tear based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Interactive engine start checklist that responds to user inputs and sim variables Interactive checklists for every stage of flight Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'ready for take-off' (if aircraft is stationary on the ground) Fully functional and comprehensive IFR capable avionics fit, including: - KMA 24H audio selector unit - GNS 430 COM 1 / NAV 1 radio and GPS unit - GNC 255 COM 2 / NAV 2 radio unit - KN 62 DME unit - KAP 150 autopilot unit with navigation, heading, altitude and pitch hold modes, and self-test functionality - GTX 330 transponder unit - KR 87 ADF unit - Support for RealityXP GTN750 (sold separately, Windows only) Interactive logbook panel for logging your flight details (X-Plane native) Flight computer panel with useful information such as fuel burn, endurance, speed and wind speed/direction Yoke-mounted flight timer/clock GoodWay compatible Ability to change barometric units from InHg to MB in altimeter adjustment Option to activate flashlight from within pop-up window, to aid in those pitch-black cold and dark starts at night Pop-up autopilot window Option to remove window and instrument reflection effects Animated toe brakes Radio knob animations routed through plugin logic, for optimum movement fidelity and sound synchronisation Aircraft systems Custom-coded fuel system, including the option of automatic fuel tank switching for use on those long distance cross-country flights (this option is remembered for future flights) Custom-coded electrical system with functional circuit breakers. Circuit breaker logic is linked to X-Plane's internal failure logic, so if the plane is set to fail a certain electrical component after a certain number of hours, the circuit breaker for that element will pop out. Realistic landing gear with slow/fast tyre rotation animation (blurry when rotating fast), precise shock absorber animation and wheel chocks and tie-downs Dedicated interactive engine pop-up window displaying values such as fuel tank weights and imbalance, fuel pressure, oil pressure, oil temperature, battery charge (with quick charge option), and information about spark plug fouling and vapour lock condition Simulated vapour lock condition, with warning pop-up and suggested actions Simulated spark plug fouling condition, with indication of percentage of fouling Lighting system includes separate lighting control for gauges (via rheostat) and realistic implementation of navigation light / radio light rheostat Functional electric trim control on yoke Custom external light logic with custom strobe light pattern and custom light halos for added realism Liveries The TB-10 is supplied in the following paint schemes: N5548C G-CBHA D-EABM F-GTQF VH-TBA The TB-20 is supplied in the following paint schemes: SX-ATK CS-DDK CS-DEP D-EPIM G-VPPL Other features Realistic and accurate flight dynamics based on real-world performance and handling data, and input from TB20 pilots Authentic sound set, generated using X-Plane's state-of-the-art FMOD sound system Custom sounds for switches, doors, warnings and more, featuring accurate location placement of sounds in the stereo spectrum, 3D audio effects, atmospheric effects, adaptive Doppler, exterior sounds spill in when window or door(s) are opened, different sound characteristics depending on viewing angle etc. Comprehensive manual with panel guide and performance data PSD Paint Kit included so you can create your own paint schemes Dedicated pop-up window for sound mixing, allowing for individual adjustment of the volume of exterior sounds, in-cockpit sounds and various effects Custom weight and balance manager window Requirements are also quite heavy, but if you have purchased their Arrow series, you will know the hi-quality that comes with these aircraft X-Plane 11 Intel Core i5 6600K at 3.5GHz or faster 8GB RAM or more DirectX 12-capable graphics card from nVidia, AMD or Intel with at least 4GB VRAM (GeForce GTX 1070 or better or similar from AMD) Windows 10 / 7 / Vista / XP, MAC OS 10.10 (or higher) or Linux 2GB hard drive space JustFlight are here: JustFlight Should be on the X-Plane.OrgStore very soon... Images and text are courtesy of Just Flight ________________________________________ News by Stephen Dutton 2nd May 2018 Copyright©2018: X-Plane Reviews
  19. News! - Aircraft Release! - PA-28-161 Piper Warrior ll by JustFlight/Thranda JustFlight and Thranda have released their fourth aircraft based on the PA-28 Cherokee. This is the PA-28-161 Piper Warrior ll after the other PA-28's of the Arrow lll, the Turbo Arrow lll and the Turbo Arrow lV. The difference? The Warrior ll was the 160 hp (119 kW) Cherokee with the tapered wing and was first certified on 2nd November 1976. The aircraft is just slightly heavier and has the PA28-160 Cherokee's fixed landing gear. Internally you would be hard pressed to tell the difference between the Warrior and the Arrow except for the "Century 21" Autopilot, which is a simple roll-axis only (heading) style instrument. The Warrior feels and flies like a more simpler aircraft than the Arrow, and that is why it is very popular with Flying Schools, uncomplicated and easy to fly and that sum's up very well this very latest aircraft from JustFlight and Thranda. Cabin is the same as the Arrow lll in being all red, in really red. Features include: Model Accurately modeled PA-28-161 Warrior II, built using real-world aircraft plans Numerous animations, including multi-animation passenger door that, when open, responds to G-forces and air resistance, baggage door, cockpit window, sun visors and oil cover Ground equipment including chocks and tie-downs 4096 x 4096 textures are used to produce the highest possible texture clarity PBR (Physically Based Rendering) materials with real-time environment reflections for superb quality and realism Detailed normal mapping for down-to-the-rivet precision of aircraft features Cockpit A truly 3D virtual cockpit right down to accurately modelled seat belts and screw heads - every instrument is constructed fully in 3D with smooth animations Cockpit textures feature wear and tear based on reference photos taken in the real aircraft to produce an authentic environment Interactive engine start checklist that responds to user inputs and sim variables Interactive checklists for every stage of flight Aircraft configuration system that will allow you to choose between 'cold & dark' or 'ready for take-off' (if aircraft is stationary on the ground) Fully functional and comprehensive IFR-capable avionics fit including: KMA 20 audio selector unit Fully Featured X-Plane-native GNS530 (supports procedures out of the box, and supports Navigraph and Aerosoft custom nav databases) KX 175B COM 2 / NAV 2 radio KN 62 DME unit which can display information from NAV 1 or NAV 2 Century 21 autopilot with lateral hold modes (HDG, NAV, APR, REV) – hidden autopilot altitude hold system included for convenience KT 76A transponder unit KR 85 ADF unit Support for RealityXP GTN750 (sold separately, Windows only) Ground elements include Static chocks, tiedowns and great animated main cabin door and baggage door. Aircraft systems Included: Custom-coded fuel system, including the option of automatic fuel tank switching for use on those long distance cross-country flights (this option is remembered for future flights) Custom-coded electrical system with functional circuit breakers, avionics power circuit and emergency bus controls. Circuit breaker logic is linked to X-Plane's internal failure logic, so if the plane is set to fail a certain electrical component after a certain number of hours, the circuit breaker for that element will pop out. Realistic landing gear with slow/fast tyre rotation animation (blurry when rotating fast), precise shock absorber animation and wheel chocks and tie-downs Functioning carburettor and primer controls Dedicated interactive engine pop-up window displaying values such as fuel tank weights and imbalance, fuel pressure, oil pressure, oil temperature, battery charge (with quick charge option), and information about spark plug fouling and vapour lock condition Simulated vapour lock condition, with warning pop-up and suggested actions Simulated spark plug fouling condition, with indication of percentage of fouling Lighting system includes separate lighting control for gauges (via rheostat) and realistic implementation of navigation light / radio light rheostat Functional electric trim control on yoke (requires electric trim button to be pushed) Simulated fan and vent system with realistic blower sounds (linked to circuit breaker logic and electrical system for realism) Custom external light logic with custom strobe light pattern and custom light halos for added realism Liveries include both open and closed wheels with: A blank White and C-FOEC (Canada), G-BOZI (UK), G-SIXT (UK), VH-BVM (Australia) - F-GEDO (France)*, G-OPTI (UK)*, D-EIIT (Germany)*, N8289A (USA)* (The liveries marked with an asterisk (*) include fairings over the wheels.) A paintkit is included as well. Requirements: X-Plane 11+ Windows, Mac or Linux 4GB+ VRAM (GeForce GTX 1070 or better or similar from AMD) Windows 10 / 7 / Vista / XP, MAC OS 10.10 (or higher) or Linux Current version: 1.0 (Jan 26th 2018) PS: Owners of the Arrow III or Arrow Turbo by JustFlight can purchase this new Warrior II with a $9 discount ( $32.99). Find your coupon code under your Arrow invoice at the store (doesn't apply to Arrows from other designers) ______________________________________________________________________ Yes! the Piper Warrior ll by Just Flight - Thranda is NOW available from the X-Plane.Org Store here : PA-28-161 Warrior lll Price is US$41.99 Note the above deal for owners of the Arrow III or Arrow Turbo by JustFlight can purchase this new Warrior II with a $9 discount ( $32.99). _____________________________________________________________________________________ Review by Stephen Dutton 27th January 2018 Copyright©2018: X-PlaneReviews (Disclaimer. All images and text in this review are the work and property of X-PlaneReviews, no sharing or copy of the content is allowed without consent from the author as per copyright conditions)
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